EPA

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In The Moment ... June 12, 2018 Show 356 Hour 1

Is there a pathway for expansion of ethanol markets or are fuel economy regulations in the way? Are those regulations effective for other reasons? To help us understand current EPA rules and to discuss the Renewable Enhancement and Growth Support rule, we're joined by Doug Sombke, President of the South Dakota Farmers Union.

EPA Fines Harley Davidson On Emissions

Aug 29, 2016
Lee Strubinger / SDPB

Earlier this month the Environmental Protection Agency fined Harley Davidson 15-million-dollars over the sale of an aftermarket device that enhanced bike performance, but increased allowable emissions.

The settlement comes just after the Sturgis Motorcycle Rally – and after the EPA leveed a much larger fine on the auto manufacturer VW for violating emission standards.

SDSM&T / SDPB

The EPA and the National Institute of Health are funding a new project to examine potential impacts of pollution in Indian Country.

The Center for Indigenous Environmental Health Research is based at the University of Arizona.   

Researchers are focusing their work on environmental health problems in Indian Country

DENR Report: 143 Impaired Water Bodies In SD

May 4, 2016
Kealey Bultena / SDPB

A new report by the state’s Department of Environment and Natural Resources lists 143 of South Dakota's streams, lakes, and rivers as impaired or polluted.

The DENR reports pollution in surface water to the EPA every two years.

$10 Million Settlement In Gilt Edge Cleanup

Apr 18, 2016
Amy Varland

Federal and State officials have secured $10 million in a settlement agreement for cleanup of the Gilt Edge Superfund site.

In the late 1990’s, the company operating the open pit gold mine in the Northern Black Hills went bankrupt and abandoned the site. Part of the effort to pay for on-going reclamation includes settlement agreements with the private companies involved in the former operation.

Changes Made In Response To Lead In Water

Apr 5, 2016
DENR

State and federal officials are making adjustments to the water testing process after major lead issues in Flint, Michigan, and a recent concern in a small town right here in South Dakota.

South Dakota Is Party To Multiple Lawsuits Against The EPA

Dec 17, 2015
Kealey Bultena / SDPB

South Dakota is now suing the EPA over implementation of the Clean Water Act.    

South Dakota Attorney General Marty Jackley says  federal officials are overstepping their authority in regulating how South Dakota uses its water.

This is one in a number of multi state lawsuits the state has currently signed on against the EPA.

Jackley Joins Suit Against EPA Over CO2

Oct 26, 2015
Charles Michael Ray

South Dakota has signed on to a multiple state lawsuit against the EPA over attempts to limit CO2 emissions.

South Dakota Attorney General Marty Jackley says the EPA’s move hurts the state’s economy by increasing energy prices and reducing jobs.

But many scientists worry that industrialized nations need to go even further to reduce greenhouse gasses, they cite a disjunct between well-established research and policy.

CO Mine Wastewater Spill Highlights SD Cleanup Plan

Aug 13, 2015
Amy Varland

A recent spill of 3 million gallons of mine wastewater from an EPA Superfund Site in the Rocky Mountains turned Colorado’s Animus River orange.

South Dakota and other states across the west are dotted with abandoned mines that are now being cleaned up by government regulators.

Currently the Gilt-Edge Superfund Site in the Northern Black Hills has 68 million gallons of mine wastewater stored in holding ponds.     

But EPA and state officials are undertaking a $50 million project to reduce the annual cost of water treatment.

$50-Million Gilt Edge Superfund Cleanup Sought

Jan 22, 2015
Amy Varland

The EPA is planning to spend an extra $50-million to reduce acid mine drainage at a former strip mine in the Northern Black Hills that is now a Superfund Site.

South Dakota’s new U.S. Senator Mike Rounds is now chair of the Environment and Public Works Subcommittee on Regulatory Oversight.

The committee oversees both the EPA and Army Corps of Engineers–the Subcommittee that Rounds chairs has oversight of federal programs like EPA Superfund sites.    

December first was the deadline for comments on a new Environmental Protection Agency rule designed to cut national carbon dioxide emissions. On that same day, the state Public Utilities Commission met with representatives of the Midcontinent Independent System Operator, or MISO, which delivers electrical power to the country’s midsection, from Montana to Indiana and Canada to the Gulf of Mexico. The very eastern edge of South Dakota is included in that service area.

In June, the Environmental Protection Agency released its proposed rules for cutting national carbon dioxide emissions. Last week, the comment period for those rules ended. The agency will review about 2 million comments before formulating the final plan. SDPB’s Victoria Wicks talks with EPA and state Public Utilities Commission officials who hold differing views on the value of these new regulations.

Secret Science Act Irks Some Scientists

Dec 1, 2014

Congress is considering two bills that deal with how the EPA uses science to base its policy decisions.   Those backing the bills say it addresses an increase transparency and accountability over the agency that has overstepped its bounds.

But critics call the bills a thinly veiled attempt to change the science the EPA uses to base its decisions.  They say the legislation undermines scientific integrity and opens the door for polluters to stop or slow the regulation process.

A Call To Shut Down The EPA In The US Senate Race

Oct 27, 2014
Amy Varland

For U.S. Senate candidate and former Governor Mike Rounds the EPA has gone too far.  

Rounds and many others say the Environmental Protection Agency is an example of oversized federal government abusing its power and meddling too much in the livelihoods of people in South Dakota.
 
Rounds has spoken publically about eliminating the EPA, often to the cheers of those gathered in the crowd.
 
SDPB’s Charles Michael Ray asks what it would really mean if the EPA went away in South Dakota.