Kealey Bultena
SDPB

The United States House is on recess, and Congresswoman Kristi Noem is back in South Dakota. Tuesday the state’s lone Representative spoke in Sioux Falls at a Chamber of Commerce luncheon. She then met with some young professionals for a discussion about issues they see.

Men with careers in finance, politics, law and technology have questions for Congresswoman Kristi Noem.  Yannick Laroche is a production manager in wind energy.

Six years ago, the first Keystone pipeline was under construction through several counties in Eastern South Dakota. One landowner testified Tuesday before the Public Utilities Commission in Pierre that reclamation has not been done. The PUC has been taking testimony for more than a week to determine if TransCanada, the Keystone XL pipeline parent company, can meet 50 conditions attached to its 2010 permit. Among those conditions is land reclamation. The Keystone XL, if built, will run through Western South Dakota.

Mitchell Corn Palace

The three new domes are up at the Mitchell Corn Palace. The new, onion-shaped domes were installed last Monday. The domes, along with new decorative turrets, are part of a $7.2 million renovation of the iconic South Dakota landmark.

Democrats have their first candidate for the U.S. House. Two-term state Representative Paula Hawks of Hartford announced her candidacy on Monday for the seat held by Republican Kristi Noem. Hawks says her experience in the legislature makes her a good candidate for Congress.  She wants to focus on seniors, farmers and ranchers, equality for women, education and student loan debt.

South Dakota Welcomes Bikers

2 hours ago

The 75th annual Sturgis Rally is in full swing, and South Dakota rolled out the red carpet, but not how you’d think. Information Centers across the state get ready for Sturgis every year, because the rest stops could be the first contact visitors have with South Dakotans.

This sound can be heard throughout the state this week. Bikers from around the country are flocking to South Dakota. If you’re in South Dakota . . . the Sturgis Rally is hard to escape. Take the folks at an interstate rest stop . . . 420 miles outside Sturgis.

“My name is Curtis.”

Kealey Bultena / SDPB

The 75th anniversary of the Sturgis Rally this week could double the population in South Dakota. If you somehow haven’t encountered bikes in person, you can’t escape them in the news. As part of our continuing coverage of the rally, here is one story that profiles some of the people you might encounter gliding through the state on two wheels.

Victoria Wicks

An economist from Oregon said Monday that the U.S. State Department’s socio-economic study of the Keystone XL pipeline is seriously flawed. The report was not generated by TransCanada but is included as an exhibit for PUC commissioners’ consideration. Kevin Cahill testified for Standing Rock Sioux Tribe at the ongoing Public Utilities Commission hearing, held to determine if TransCanada can meet the 50 conditions imposed on a 2010 permit.

For a thorough look at the Keystone projects and their effects on South Dakota economy, go to the following links to find past SDPB coverage.

Victoria Wicks

Tribal rights have been a touchy subject at the Public Utility Commission’s Keystone XL hearing in Pierre. A pre-hearing order issued by the commission excludes aboriginal title arguments, but not discussion of treaty rights, a distinction attorneys don’t agree on. The pipeline, if built, crosses the western half of South Dakota, over territory set aside for the tribes of the Great Sioux Nation by the Fort Laramie Treaties, and although most of that land is now out of trust, certain laws still apply.

Chynna Lockett

The Sturgis Rally features activities such as rock concerts, motorcycle races and mud wrestling. But the rally also includes events that celebrate motorcycle culture. 

The art exhibition in the new town of the Buffalo Chip, South Dakota, is titled the Naked Truth, Motorcycles Exposed. It included metal motorcycles sitting on pedestals that are scattered around the room.

Hank Harris / Reuben Sinnema

Aug 3, 2015
South Dakota Arts Council

This week's program includes separate sets from Hank Harris and Reuben Sinnema recorded at the 35th annual Sioux River Folk Festival last year at Newton Hills State Park.  Hank Harris can stitch rock and roll, country, ethnic folk, Americana, gospel, bluegrass, cowboy songs and so many other genres together into a delightful live show.  Of the flexible singer/songwriter, Black Hills Magazine said, "Hank may be the hardest working man in show-biz now that James Brown is no longer with us!"

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