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Victoria Wicks

Stanley Patrick Weber will serve the rest of his life in federal prison.

The former Indian Health Services pediatrician was convicted earlier this year of raping and sexually assaulting boys who were his patients at Pine Ridge IHS.

Weber was sentenced in Rapid City federal court on Monday, Feb. 11.

In crafting the sentence, Federal Judge Jeffrey Viken considered the lifelong damage done to each victim.

SDPB's Victoria Wicks reports.

Statehouse: Feb 7, 2020

Feb 7, 2020
SDPB

The Statehouse podcast is SDPB Radio's legislative podcast that features a compilation of the top stories coming from Pierre. 

You'll hear about a bill to allow sports gambling in South Dakota has started its journey through the Legislature, and how House Republicans are rejecting an amendment that would add tribal IDs as a valid identification to register to vote. All this and more in today's Statehouse Podcast.

 

Politics and public policy reporting is supported by The Center for Western Studies at Augustana University

 

Montana Federal Court

A Montana federal judge has set a hearing date for renewed arguments on the Keystone XL pipeline.

The Indigenous Environmental Network and North Coast Rivers Alliance have again asked for a preliminary injunction against permitting the pipeline.

TransCanada and the Trump administration have asked for summary judgment.

Judge Brian Morris will hear arguments on those requests and more in Great Falls on March 25.

SDPB's Victoria Wicks has this report.

SD Department of Corrections

A lifer in the state penitentiary has lost a bid for a new trial. Chance Harruff is serving a mandatory life sentence for strangling his former girlfriend.

He appealed, saying five witnesses' testimony overlapped, and that cumulative evidence prejudiced the jury.

The South Dakota Supreme Court has unanimously upheld his conviction

SDPB's Victoria Wicks reports.

The South Dakota Supreme Court will hold its next term on Feb. 10-11, with oral arguments in three cases on the second day.

Victoria Wicks file photo

News: Jan 25 - 31

Jan 31, 2020
SDPB

In this week's news coverage, you'll hear about a proposed ban on banning plastic straws and bags, a roll-back on gun restrictions, an experts take on House Bill 1057, and much more.

Have a story idea? Send an e-mail to InTheMoment@SDPB.org.

You can now subscribe to In the Moment on YouTube and watch your favorite full-length interviews.

Statehouse: Jan 30, 2020

Jan 30, 2020
SDPB

The Statehouse podcast is SDPB Radio's legislative podcast that features a compilation of the top stories coming from Pierre. 

Governor Kristi Noem delivered the end of the week press conference... this and more in today's Statehouse Podcast.

 

Politics and public policy reporting is supported by The Center for Western Studies at Augustana University

Victoria Wicks file photo

Last year Governor Kristi Noem introduced legislation designed to squelch pipeline protests and collect money from protest supporters.

The governor brought the bills late, and the legislature rushed them through to passage. But a federal lawsuit put a quick stop to one of them on constitutional grounds.

Now the governor has again introduced the legislation, but this time early in the session with major fixes.

Statehouse: Jan 29, 2020

Jan 29, 2020
SDPB

The Statehouse podcast is SDPB Radio's legislative podcast that features a compilation of the top stories coming from Pierre. 

In today's edition, you will hear how Republicans in the House Judiciary committee are pushing forward a bill that criminalizes brokering commercial surrogacy, and an effort to continue rolling back gun restrictions in South Dakota stumbled out of the gate this week in the Legislature, but it’s just the first of several gun debates that will happen this winter in Pierre... All this and more in today's Statehouse Podcast.

 

 

Statehouse: Jan 28, 2020

Jan 28, 2020
SDPB

The Statehouse podcast is SDPB Radio's legislative podcast that features a compilation of the top stories coming from Pierre. 

In today's edition, you will hear about a bill that look to place a ban on the banning of plastic straws and bags. All this and more in today's Statehouse podcast.

 

Politics and public policy reporting is supported by The Center for Western Studies at Augustana University

TransCanada and the Trump administration have renewed their request to dismiss Montana lawsuits against the Keystone XL pipeline.

Parties filed briefs late in the day on Friday, Jan. 24.

Both proponents and opponents of the pipeline restated positions already on record in December, when Montana Federal Judge Brian Morris denied dismissal of the lawsuits and asked for further briefing.

Morris asked parties to clarify several issues, including whether the president has authority to issue a permit.

SDPB's Victoria Wicks has this report.

News: Jan 18 - 24

Jan 24, 2020
SDPB

In this week's news, a panel of SDPB reporters discuss what they have been covering during the legislative session. The South Dakota Farm Bureau Federation President joins us to talk about trade, USMCA, and how South Dakota looks to benefit. And the Dakota Political Junkies joined Lori for a look at South Dakota's top political headlines.

Have a story idea? Send an e-mail to InTheMoment@SDPB.org.

A full panel of judges in the Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals will decide if the Indian Child Welfare Act is based on race or politics.

The court heard oral arguments on Wednesday, Jan. 22, in New Orleans.

In 2018 a Texas lower court found the act known as ICWA to be unconstitutionally race-based. A three-judge panel overturned that finding, but not unanimously.

Now all of the appeals judges in the Fifth Circuit will consider the issue.

SDPB's Victoria Wicks has this report.

To hear audio of oral arguments in their entirety, click on this link:

Victoria Wicks file photo

The South Dakota Water Management Board has approved permits for construction of the Keystone XL pipeline. After a dozen days of hearings held over the past nine months, the board unanimously voted on Tuesday, Jan. 21, to allow TransCanada, or TC Energy, to draw water from three South Dakota rivers.

The board also permitted Wink Cattle Company near Howes and landowners Dean and Lori Wilson near Buffalo to use water for the worker camps TC intends to build on their property.

Victoria Wicks

The U.S. Forest Service is not allowed to say no to mining, but it can insist on protections for surface resources. That fact emerged during an open house held at the Mystic District station in the Black Hills last week.

A Minneapolis prospecting company, F3 Gold, wants to drill exploratory holes near Pactola Reservoir in the Silver City area, and residents showed up to ask questions and express concerns.

SDPB's Victoria Wicks has this report.

Victoria Wicks

A gold prospecting company wants to drill exploratory holes in the Silver City area, near Pactola Reservoir in the Black Hills.

The Mystic District of the U.S. Forest Service held an open house last week to offer information and explain how people can make written comments.

Area residents expressed concerns, not only about mining, but also about the hearing process.

SDPB's Victoria Wicks reports.

NARF staff photo

TC Energy has reported to a Montana federal court that it intends to start construction on the Keystone XL pipeline next month.

Trenching won't begin until April. But in February and March, the company plans to move heavy equipment to sites for worker camps, pump stations, pipe yards, and the first crossing at the U.S.-Canada border.

An attorney for the Rosebud Sioux Tribe says TC is jumping the gun.

SDPB's Victoria Wicks has this report.

Victoria Wicks file photo

Supporters and opponents of the Keystone XL pipeline summarized eleven days of testimony before the South Dakota Water Management Board on Tuesday, Dec. 14.

Attorneys for the South Dakota Water Rights Program and for TC Energy hold that state law limits the board's consideration specifically to the use of water during pipeline construction.

But opponents say the board has an obligation to consider potential water contamination and health consequences after the pipeline is finished.

Faith Spotted Eagle file photo

An elder from the Yankton Sioux Tribe testified Monday, Jan. 13, on the potential impacts on women if the Keystone XL pipeline is built. Faith Spotted Eagle says the past, present, and future of indigenous women are threatened by construction and pollution. She made comments to the South Dakota Water Management Board in its hearing to determine whether to allow water use for the pipeline. SDPB's Victoria Wicks reports.

Victoria Wicks file photo

The South Dakota Water Management Board is hoping to wrap up hearings on Keystone XL pipeline permits in the next two days.

The board heard five days of testimony in October and five more days last month.

TC Energy and two landowners want to use water from Western South Dakota sources to build the pipeline and run worker camps.

Opponents include West River tribes and landowners.

SDPB's Victoria Wicks has this report.

To read the Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement and make a comment, click on the link below. The review ends on Jan. 21.

C-Span

A federal judge in Montana has denied requests from President Donald Trump and other federal agencies to dismiss lawsuits against them for permitting the Keystone XL pipeline.

The actions were filed by the Rosebud Sioux Tribe, Fort Belknap Indian Community, Indigenous Environmental Network, and North Coast Rivers Alliance.

Judge Brian Morris issued his ruling just before Christmas. He says, in part, that it's up to Congress, not just presidents, to regulate commerce with foreign nations. And he says it's up to the courts to figure it out.

A federal judge in Montana has refused to dismiss a lawsuit brought by two tribes against President Donald Trump.

The suit claims the president's unilateral permitting of the Keystone XL pipeline in early 2019 violated treaties and the U.S. Constitution.

The Rosebud Sioux Tribe and Fort Belknap Indian Community say federal agencies have a duty to consult government-to-government with tribes.

In South Dakota, during water management hearings, a Rosebud official outlines the inadequacy of tribal involvement to date.

SDPB's Victoria Wicks reports.

Montana Federal Court

A federal judge in Montana has handed tribes and environmentalists a pair of partial victories in their fight to stop the Keystone XL pipeline.

Judge Brian Morris has denied requests for dismissal of suits against President Donald Trump, the U.S. State Department, and other federal agencies.

The actions were filed by the Rosebud Sioux Tribe, Fort Belknap Indian Community, Indigenous Environmental Network, and North Coast Rivers Alliance, et al.

First Peoples Worldwide

Indian reservations are vulnerable to crime and exploitation when transient workers pass through the area. That's the testimony the South Dakota Water Management Board heard on Friday, Dec. 20.

The board is considering whether to allow the Keystone XL project to use local water if the pipeline is built through this state.

SDPB's Victoria Wicks has this report.

The South Dakota Supreme Court has overturned the drug conviction of a Deadwood hotel guest whose arrest started with a traffic stop.

Prosecutors held that one taillight violated state law. But the defense argued successfully that it did not, and so all drug evidence leading from that stop was inadmissible.

SDPB's Victoria Wicks reports.

Victoria Wicks

If the Keystone XL pipeline is constructed, workers will stay in 10 camps as they move through Montana, South Dakota, and Nebraska.

Pipeline opponents have shared concerns about the potential for workers to commit crimes, especially against women.

At a South Dakota Water Management Board hearing on Thursday, Dec. 19, a project supervisor explained how TC Energy contractors keep control over their employees.

Victoria Wicks file photo

The chief engineer for the South Dakota water rights program says state law governs what she considers when reviewing applications.

Jeanne Goodman signed off on five water permits for construction of the Keystone XL pipeline project. Those permits have been contested by pipeline opponents.

Goodman took the stand on Wednesday, Dec. 18 at hearings in front of the Water Management Board and faced hours of cross examination.

SDPB's Victoria Wicks has this report.

Victoria Wicks file photo

Opponents to the Keystone XL pipeline tried to get climage change reports into the record at a state Water Management Board hearing held this week in Pierre.

TC Energy's attorney objected to repeated efforts to include the Fourth National Climate Assessment and other information on climate change for the board's consideration.

Although the data was not allowed, one witness testified to taking climate reports into consideration when making plans for tribal water use.

SDPB's Victoria Wicks has this report.

Victoria Wicks file photo

This week the South Dakota Water Management Board is hearing four more days of testimony on water permits for construction of the Keystone XL pipeline. The board heard five days of testimony in October, but didn't get through TC Energy's requests.

Still waiting to be heard are applications from two landowners who want to host worker camps.

SDPB's Victoria Wicks has this report on the latest round of hearings that started Tuesday, Dec. 17.

Lakota leaders gather this week in Rapid City for the Oceti Sakowin Treaty Conference. It's the second year the Rosebud Treaty Council has hosted this event, which coincides with the Lakota Nation Invitational, now in its 43rd year.

Topics and presenters at this year's conference include the Doctrine of Discovery with author Steven Newcomb; International Repatriation with Andrea Carmen of the International Indian Treaty Council; Inherent Rights with Oregon attorney Patrick Kincaid; and a review of legal cases involving tribes, presented by Colorado attorney Andy Reid.

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