Drug Abuse

Attorney General Marty Jackley discusses the opioid crisis and legislation passed this session in Pierre to increase penalties for drug-related offenses. We also discuss the potential impact of the White House Opioid Summit on March 1, 2018.

In The Moment ... March 6, 2018 Show 290 Hour 2

Kealey Bultena / SDPB

South Dakota authorities have taken 500-thousand dollars’ worth of a dangerous drug off the street. Tuesday Chamberlain Police and the state’s Division of Criminal Investigation executed a search warrant. They found 20,000 fentanyl pills.

Fentanyl has real medical uses. The National Institute on Drug Abuse reports that doctors prescribe the synthetic opioid to ease pain after surgery or alleviate chronic pain. People addicted to drugs may use fentanyl that’s manufactured for medicine.

Rapid City Police Department

September 18 marks the start of National Heroin and Opioid Awareness Week.
 
Data from the Centers for Disease and Control and Prevention shows South Dakota has been largely unaffected by the opioid epidemic.

But since the start of 2016 law enforcement officials report at least ten South Dakotan deaths from opioid overdoses.

Rapid City Police Department

So far, the data shows South Dakota has largely been immune to the opioid drug abuse epidemic affecting other areas of the country.  In 2014, only one death resulted from a heroin overdose in the state.

Now, law enforcement officials in Rapid City and Sioux Falls are reporting an increase in heroin and other opioid drug use.  Since the start of 2016, at least ten South Dakotans have died from opioid overdoses.

Kealey Bultena / SDPB

A Pierre man is alive because first responders used a medication to reverse the effects of a drug overdose. Officials credit the drug Narcan for saving the man’s life.

South Dakota Attorney General Marty Jackley says emergency crews responded to a call in Pierre Monday night for a man who needed medical attention.

Kealey Bultena / SDPB

A new study shows judicial reforms saved South Dakota $34 million in the first two years. Sweeping changes in mid-2013 included presumptive probation. That means judges sentencing people for low-level felonies keep offenders in communities instead of sending them to prison. Researchers from the Justice Policy Center say initial results are promising, but the work isn’t finished.

A new report indicates changes that keep more offenders out of prison are helping state coffers without risking public safety.