Rachel Martin

Rachel Martin is host of Morning Edition, as well as NPR's morning news podcast Up First, along with Steve Inskeep and David Greene.

Before taking on this role in December 2016, Martin was the host of Weekend Edition Sunday for four years. Martin also served as National Security Correspondent for NPR, where she covered both defense and intelligence issues. She traveled regularly to Iraq and Afghanistan with the Secretary of Defense, reporting on the U.S. wars and the effectiveness of the Pentagon's counterinsurgency strategy. Martin also reported extensively on the changing demographic of the U.S. military – from the debate over whether to allow women to fight in combat units – to the repeal of Don't Ask Don't Tell. Her reporting on how the military is changing also took her to a U.S. Air Force base in New Mexico for a rare look at how the military trains drone pilots.

Martin was part of the team that launched NPR's experimental morning news show, The Bryant Park Project, based in New York — a two-hour daily multimedia program that she co-hosted with Alison Stewart and Mike Pesca.

In 2006-2007, Martin served as NPR's religion correspondent. Her piece on Islam in America was awarded "Best Radio Feature" by the Religion News Writers Association in 2007. As one of NPR's reporters assigned to cover the Virginia Tech massacre that same year, she was on the school's campus within hours of the shooting and on the ground in Blacksburg, Va., covering the investigation and emotional aftermath in the following days.

Based in Berlin, Germany, Martin worked as a NPR foreign correspondent from 2005-2006. During her time in Europe, she covered the London terrorist attacks, the federal elections in Germany, the 2006 World Cup and issues surrounding immigration and shifting cultural identities in Europe.

Her foreign reporting experience extends beyond Europe. Martin has also worked extensively in Afghanistan. She began reporting from there as a freelancer during the summer of 2003, covering the reconstruction effort in the wake of the U.S. invasion. In fall 2004, Martin returned for several months to cover Afghanistan's first democratic presidential election. She has reported widely on women's issues in Afghanistan, the fledgling political and governance system and the U.S.-NATO fight against the insurgency. She has also reported from Iraq, where she covered U.S. military operations and the strategic alliance between Sunni sheiks and the U.S. military in Anbar province.

Martin started her career at public radio station KQED in San Francisco, as a producer and reporter.

She holds an undergraduate degree in political science from the University of Puget Sound in Tacoma, Washington, and a Master's degree in International Affairs from Columbia University.

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This morning, residents in Florida's Panhandle are waking up to a view of the devastation that was left behind by Hurricane Michael.

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Hurricane Michael has grown rapidly now to a Category 4 storm over the Gulf of Mexico, heading for the Florida Panhandle.

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There was a time when President Trump boasted that he might be the first person ever to make a profit off running for president.

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A president who's often made demands of the Justice Department now insists - whatever works, it's all good.

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Just how much further is the Federal Bureau of Investigation supposed to look into the life of Brett Kavanaugh?

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BRETT KAVANAUGH: What I know is the truth. And the truth is I've never sexually assaulted anyone, in high school or otherwise.

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Khaled Hosseini is known for his books about Afghanistan: The Kite Runner, A Thousand Splendid Suns, And The Mountains Echoed.

His latest work Sea Prayer is a departure from those best-selling novels — it's a short work of fiction that captures the heartbreak of the Syrian refugee crisis. It's told as a poetic letter, from a father to a son as they prepare to embark on a journey across the sea, and features the illustrations of Dan Williams.

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Some senators say they should take some time before voting on Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh.

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We know that forecasters, they do the best they can. But it is an imprecise science. Their predictions may turn out differently. Having said that, the latest forecast for Hurricane Florence is pretty bad.

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The book Small Fry is a memoir of a girl growing up in 1980s California as the daughter of a single mom — an artist who is frequently moving from place to place, never able to make ends meet. The author insists it's universal, a coming-of-age story amid the scent of eucalyptus and West Coast sunlight.

Except the writer's father is Steve Jobs, co-founder of Apple.

Morning News Brief

Aug 29, 2018

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In Florida, Democratic voters may have sent a message yesterday about the kind of candidate they are looking for this election year.

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It was an undercover operation set in Argentina, 1960. An elite crew of Israeli agents tracked down and secretly kidnapped one of the world's most notorious war criminals: the Nazi SS officer Adolf Eichmann, who was hiding in Buenos Aires.

Eichmann was among the major organizers of the Holocaust, responsible for transporting millions of European Jews to death camps. The film Operation Finale, starring Ben Kingsley, recounts the daring mission to bring Eichmann to justice.

Morning News Brief

Aug 23, 2018

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So are President Trump's legal problems about to multiply?

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Two of his closest former aides now stand guilty of serious crimes. One of them, the president's former personal lawyer Michael Cohen, directly implicated President Trump in criminal wrongdoing.

Morning News Brief

Aug 21, 2018

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The meddling has certainly not ended. A group with ties to the Russian government has been linked to another hacking attempt.

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Morning News Brief

Aug 3, 2018

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White House officials came out yesterday, and they showed a rare unified front. They said they're focused on preventing interference in U.S. elections.

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Yeah. Here's how Director of National Intelligence Dan Coats put it.

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Fallout from the election in Zimbabwe this week appears to be getting violent. Security forces in the capital city Harare have been confronting protesters. NPR's Eyder Peralta was there when the unrest broke out.

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Morning News Brief

Jul 30, 2018

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All right, President Trump is once again threatening to shut down the government if he doesn't get money for his border wall.

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Morning News Brief

Jul 24, 2018

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President Trump is considering revoking the security clearances of some former high-level officials who have criticized him.

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Morning News Brief

Jun 7, 2018

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In recent years, North Korea has launched missiles that theoretically could have reached the United States.

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Senate Democratic Leader Chuck Schumer of New York and other top Democrats sent a letter to President Trump yesterday, laying out five tough demands ahead of Trump's summit with North Korea later this month, including "verifiable and irreversible dismantlement of North Korea's nuclear program." Schumer spoke with NPR's Rachel Martin on Monday afternoon in his office at the Capitol.

Rachel Martin: Thank you so much for taking the time to talk with us.

Sen. Chuck Schumer: Great to be here.

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