Victoria Wicks

SDPB Freelance Reporter/Producer

Rapid City freelancer Victoria L. Wicks has been producing news for SDPB since August 2007. She has in the past been a newspaper reporter, and she spent about 14 years advocating for crime victims in Rapid City and Aberdeen. Vicky is also a creative writer; several of her short stories have been published, one of them in an anthology titled Fishing for Chickens: Short Stories about Rural Youth. In addition, Vicky is a visual artist, creating pottery, watercolors, oil and acrylic paintings, and photographs. She holds a Master of Arts degree in English from the University of South Dakota.

Melissa Hamersma Sievers / SDPB

South Dakota inmate Daniel Charles came up before the South Dakota Supreme Court on Tuesday, Jan. 10. Charles' attorney asked for reconsideration of his 92-year prison sentence. Charles was 14 when he killed his stepfather in Meade County. He's now 32. He'll be 60 before he comes up for parole. His attorney argues that parole at retirement age doesn't allow Charles to have a meaningful life on the outside. SDPB's Victoria Wicks reports.

Victoria Wicks

Children at the Rapid City Public Library celebrated the new year a day and a half early. The "half" day comes about because they rang in the NOON year, counting down to 12 noon on Friday instead of 12 midnight on Saturday.

Children gathered on the second floor to make masks and crowns and then moved to the first-floor lobby for bagpipes, balloons, and a ball drop.

As SDPB's Victoria Wicks reports, the reviews were a rave: the first-time event was "awesome."

In a tightly divided decision, the South Dakota Supreme Court has ruled that plaintiffs in a medical liability case may see the records of patients who are not parties to the lawsuit. Three justices say state law allows release of records as long as the patients can't be identified. But two justices say state law is clear that there are no exceptions to privilege.

Photo illustration by Victoria Wicks

In Rapid City during Hanukah, Jews gather at Main Street Square for eight nights to light the menorah. The first night was Dec. 24, and the last night is Dec. 31. People gather just before sunset to sing Hanukah songs and celebrate the resiliency of the Jewish people.

The menorah lighting occurs every night at sunset, at about 5:10 p.m., ending with Dec. 31.

To hear a longer interview with Steve Benn, click on the audio below:

courtesy photo

A federal judge has ordered Seventh Circuit and Pennington County officials to stop violating the Indian Child Welfare Act.

Judge Jeffrey Viken's order affects emergency hearings held within 48 hours of the removal of children from their parent or guardian's care.

The judge's order responds to a lawsuit filed in Rapid City in March 2013 and resolves seven of eight issues. SDPB's Victoria Wicks reports on this latest development.

Unified Judicial System

David Gilbertson has been chosen by his colleagues on the South Dakota Supreme Court to serve another four years as Chief Justice.

Gilbertson says one priority is to expand mental health services for addicts and defendants.

Gilbertson was appointed to the court in 1995 and has presided since 2001. In that time, he says, the state's drug and alcohol courts have grown but so have the state's problems with addiction and mental illness.

SDPB's Victoria Wicks reports.

Minnehaha County Sheriff website

The South Dakota Attorney General has issued an opinion that Amendment S, or Marsy's Law, does not prevent the public release of certain crime information.

Some law enforcement and public safety agencies have acted on the belief that a victims' rights are conferred automatically, at the time the incident occurs. Certain agencies responded by withholding the specific location and names of victims in crime and vehicle crash reports.

Attorney General's Office

The Attorney General is issuing a 10-page opinion to clear up some questions created by Amendment S, or Marsy's Law.

Marty Jackley has appointed almost 30 professionals to serve on a committee to come up with answers.

On Monday, Dec. 5, Jackley held a conference call with the committee to discuss a draft opinion he and his staff created.

Jackley says more work remains to be done, and subcommittees can add insights.

Governor's Office

Public officials confused by the language of the recently passed victims' rights amendment are hoping a task force will sort out the issues. Amendment S, or Marsy's Law, was added to the state's constitution last month, after voters approved it. In response, certain agencies are now closing public records. The attorney general has appointed a 25-member group of state and local officials to study the reach of the new law. SDPB's Victoria Wicks reports.

SD Department of Corrections

The South Dakota Supreme Court has answered this question: can a person commit burglary if he's entering his own home? The high court released its opinion to the public on Thursday, Dec. 1, and the answer is yes, under certain circumstances. Justices say it's not so much about who owns the house as it is about the security of the people living there. SDPB's Victoria Wicks explains.

Victoria Wicks

A Pennington County official says one of the major problems in Rapid City is that wages don't support the cost of housing. The director of Pennington County Health and Human Services was one of a group of behavioral health professionals who met in Rapid City on Wednesday, Nov. 30, to find overlaps and gaps in services for the poor. The gathering was part of Collective Impact, an effort to study community problems and find solutions.

COLLECTIVE IMPACT DIRECTOR: FOOD STUDY SHOWS SERVICE GAPS

The South Dakota Department of Public Safety has stopped releasing the names of people killed or injured in traffic accidents, at least for now. The department instigated this rule in response to the new amendment to the state constitution that spells out the rights of crime victims. Included are rights to privacy and to prevent the release of certain information. SDPB's Victoria Wicks has this report.

Matt Gade/The Daily Republic

The South Dakota Supreme Court has upheld the murder conviction of Maricela Diaz. She was 15 years old when she and her boyfriend tortured, stabbed, and burned to death a 16-year-old girl near Mitchell.

Diaz claims the sentencing judge did not thoroughly take into consideration her dependency on her abusive boyfriend and her young age when he sentenced her to 80 years in prison.

The South Dakota Supreme Court has upheld the firing of a former Division of Criminal Investigation agent.

Mark Black argued that the DCI did not have sufficient cause to fire him. He also claimed that he wasn't given due process by the DCI or by the Civil Service Commission and the Sixth Circuit Court when he appealed his firing.

Black was dismissed for "chronic misbehavior," poor judgment, and allegations of domestic abuse. SDPB's Victoria Wicks has this report.

To read the SD Supreme Court opinion in its entirety, click on this link:

SD Department of Corrections

The South Dakota Supreme Court usually makes new opinions public on Thursdays. But because of the Thanksgiving holiday, the opinions came out a day early this week.

On Wednesday, Nov. 23, the court upheld five criminal convictions, as well as the firing of former DCI agent Mark Black.

One of the convictions upheld was that of Maricela Diaz, who took part in a cruel murder in Mitchell when she was 15 years old. Her appeal was heard in October.

Chicago artist Kaye Buchman calls her show "Big Wild." The exhibit opened on Friday, Nov. 18 at the Dahl Arts Center in Rapid City. It features huge sheets of white paper covered with designs drawn with a fine ink pen. Also included are several tiny, bright mixed-media paintings and a triptych, or three-panel painting, built with layers of pigment.

The artist tells SDPB's Victoria Wicks that these works, from the simple to the complicated, are connected by their natural energy.

The exhibit is on display at the Dahl through March 4, 2017.

Victoria Wicks

The Pennington County State's Attorney is adding four new employees to handle additional responsibilities of working with crime victims.

The expansion of county government comes on the heels of Amendment S, or Marsy's Law. It was passed by South Dakota voters and takes effect this week. The law offers rights to victims of all crimes and to some of their relatives.

Victoria Wicks

A group of philosophical thinkers gathered at the Rapid City Public Library on Sunday, Nov. 13, to ponder the big questions. What is the meaning of being? What does it mean to be conscious? What is responsibility? How are we different from machines?

This session was led by Black Hills State professor Timothy Martinez. He spoke with SDPB's Victoria Wicks about the importance of hearing other people's ideas when forming your own.

Courtesy of Annette Bosworth/SDPB file photo

Two years ago, Annette Bosworth was a candidate for the U.S. Senate. One year ago, she was convicted of perjury. Today, Nov. 8, the South Dakota Supreme Court heard oral arguments in her appeal.

While a candidate, Bosworth verified that she circulated nominating petitions, when in fact she was in the Philippines at the time the signatures were collected.

She now claims that her felony conviction goes beyond what her actions merit. But the prosecutor says she lied on official state documents, and her conviction is solid.

SDPB's Victoria Wicks reports.

SD Department of Corrections

A Lead man serving life in prison for murdering his girlfriend has appealed his conviction. The South Dakota Supreme Court heard oral arguments on Monday, Nov. 7.

James Lewis Rogers says police officers should have had a warrant to search his home, where they found his girlfriend's body in a suitcase in his closet. And he says he was initially questioned without first hearing his rights. SDPB's Victoria Wicks reports.

Victoria Wicks

Two candidates for Public Utilities Commissioner came together for a forum in Sturgis on Saturday, Oct. 29.

Incumbent Chris Nelson and challenger Henry Red Cloud spent about an hour introducing themselves to the audience and answering questions, primarily about renewable energy. Questions about Keystone pipelines, both in eastern and western South Dakota, were off the table because of ongoing litigation surrounding both.

This is the only time these candidates will make a joint appearance during their campaign.

Victoria Wicks

November is National Novel Writing Month, or NaNoWriMo for short, when writers around the world attempt to complete a novel in a month. And every year, at least for the past several years, writers in Rapid City have joined in. A small group showed up this year for the kick-off, and SDPB's Victoria Wicks found them at a coffee shop, the traditional haven for creative writers.

The first Rapid City write-in is this Saturday, Nov. 5, at Dunn Brothers, from 2-4 p.m. Facebook also lists a Sioux Falls group meeting from 1 to 4 p.m. Sundays at Caribou Coffee.

Victoria Wicks

Incumbent Public Utilities Commissioner Chris Nelson faced challenger Henry Red Cloud at a forum in Sturgis this weekend. This is the only joint appearance the two will make this election season.

Red Cloud says it's time for South Dakota to move away from fossil fuels and into renewable energy.

Nelson says the PUC is legally mandated to keep utility rates low.

The forum was sponsored by Dakota Rural Action and Prairie Hills Audubon Society.

Victoria Wicks

Hundreds of costumed children celebrated Halloween surrounded by dinosaur bones inside the School of Mines and Technology Museum of Geology on Saturday evening. This is the ninth year the school has hosted trick-or-treaters for its Night at the Museum.

One of the organizers tells SDPB's Victoria Wicks that children's interest in dinosaurs can lead to careers in science.

Photo courtesy of Rick Mills

The Director of the SD State Railroad Museum examines the history of wagons and railcars this week in Deadwood.

On Thursday, Rick Mills is giving a talk about transportation at the Homestake Adams Research and Cultural Center (HARCC) in Deadwood. Mills is a scholar, author, and speaker. He tells SDPB's Victoria Wicks that historically, modes of transportation have depended on each other to evolve.

Victoria Wicks

A train caboose preserved by a Huron woman is now on display at the South Dakota State Railroad Museum in Hill City. Jeanne Bauder donated the caboose that is now the centerpiece at the museum. A celebration is planned this weekend, Oct. 29, to welcome the caboose and thank Bauder for her gift.

The reception runs from 1 to 3 p.m., with a program at 2 p.m. Admission is free. The museum is located on the truck route, 222 Railroad Avenue, Building A, Hill City.

Courtesy of Jason Glodt

A retired Rapid City counselor says crime victims will lose privacy if voters approve Amendment S. That's the ballot issue also known as "Marsy's Law," which adds crime victims' rights to the state constitution. At issue is the definition of "victim," which the amendment expands to include certain family members of the direct victim.

The primary supporter says the family members aren't included unless they have suffered harm.  SDPB's Victoria Wicks reports.

Private Attorney Says Marsy's Law Diverts Resources

On Wednesday, Oct. 5, the South Dakota Supreme Court was asked this question: can an officer pull over a suspected drunk driver for no reason other than a hearsay tip?

The case comes out of Brookings, where a Hardee's employee reported to a manager that a drive-through customer seemed drunk.

The manager called the police without seeing the customer himself.

SDPB's Victoria Wicks reports on this case.

Victoria Wicks

Drunk-driving laws have been on the books for more than a century. But after all those years of legislation and case law, the bugs still haven't been worked out.

In 2013, the U.S. Supreme Court issued the opinion in Missouri v. McNeely. The court ruled that before compelling a blood test, law officers at routine stops have to get consent or a warrant. That changed procedures that had been in place nationwide for almost 50 years.

And it invalidated parts of states' implied consent laws, including South Dakota's.

A former agent for the Division of Criminal Investigation is appealing his firing for unbecoming conduct. The South Dakota Supreme Court heard the case on Monday, Oct. 3.

Former DCI agent Mark Black was discharged for inability to control his emotions, poor judgment, and dishonesty, leading to an end to his eight-year career with the state's top law enforcement agency.

SDPB's Victoria Wicks reports that some accusations against Black come from information posted on the Internet.

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