World

Europe
6:40 am
Sun June 7, 2015

As G-7 Begins, Greek Bailout Tops Agenda — And Isolation Fears Grip Greece

During an emergency session of Parliament on Friday, Greek Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras said he wanted a "European solution" to his country's financial problems, but criticized creditors' proposals.
Petros Giannakouris AP

Originally published on Mon June 8, 2015 9:28 am

Calliope Spanou knows what it's like to feel isolated. As a graduate student in France in the 1980s, she remembers how being Greek didn't feel like being part of the European family. There was, she says, arrogance from northern Europeans toward "peripheral" countries like Greece.

"You were a second-class person," she says. "The way they treated you – in their minds, we were immigrants," she recalls.

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World
4:18 pm
Sat June 6, 2015

Fighting In Eastern Ukraine Ramps Up, Raises Fears

Originally published on Sat June 6, 2015 5:40 pm

Renewed fighting in Eastern Ukraine marked an end to a tenuous cease-fire agreed to in February. NPR's Corey Flintoff explains that international observers fear that a surge in violence could plunge the region into another full scale war.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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The Two-Way
1:48 pm
Sat June 6, 2015

Putin To West: Russia Is No Threat

Russian President Vladimir Putin smiles during a meeting with foreign ministers of the Shanghai Cooperation Organization in Moscow last week.
Pavel Golovkin AP

Originally published on Sat June 6, 2015 1:58 pm

Straight from Russian President Vladimir Putin's mouth: "I would like to say — there's no need to be afraid of Russia."

Putin's comments to the Italian newspaper Corriere della Sera follow months of fighting in Ukraine between Kiev's forces and Russian-backed separatists that have reminded many of the Cold War, when the Soviet Union seemed perpetually on the verge of invading Western Europe and the forces of NATO were the only thing standing in the way.

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The Two-Way
1:07 pm
Sat June 6, 2015

Egyptian Court Rescinds Terrorist Label For Hamas

Originally published on Sat June 6, 2015 1:58 pm

A court in Egypt has overturned a ruling that named Hamas a terrorist organization. Hamas, which controls the Gaza Strip, has welcomed the move.

The decision by the Urgent Matters Appeals Court said the lower court had lacked jurisdiction.

The Associated Press quotes Sami Abu Zuhri, a spokesman for Hamas in Gaza, as saying the latest court ruling would have "positive consequences on the relationship between Hamas and Egypt."

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The Two-Way
7:59 am
Sat June 6, 2015

Saudis Shoot Down Scud Missile Fired By Houthi Rebels In Yemen

A man walks by a workshop damaged by an air strike on a nearby Scud missile base in Yemen's capital Sanaa in April.
Khaled Abdullah Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Sat June 6, 2015 12:12 pm

Saudi Arabia shot down a Scud missile fired by Houthi rebels in neighboring Yemen that was targeted at one of the kingdom's largest air bases.

NPR's Deborah Amos, reporting from Riyadh, said the Cold War-era Scud was taken down by the U.S.-supplied Patriot missile defense system.

The thwarted rebel attack comes after three Saudi soldiers and a border guard were killed in an earlier border skirmish, she says.

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Middle East
7:37 am
Sat June 6, 2015

ISIS Attack On Kobani Looms Over Turkish Elections

Originally published on Sat June 6, 2015 11:44 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Middle East
7:37 am
Sat June 6, 2015

U.N.-Led Yemen Peace Talks Are Set For June 14

Originally published on Sat June 6, 2015 11:44 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Movies
7:37 am
Sat June 6, 2015

Roy Andersson: From Mordant Ad Director To Philosophical Filmmaker

Andersson's new film, A Pigeon Sat on a Branch Reflecting on Existence, consists of a series of absurdist episodes. It opens with a man (Per Bergqvist) wandering a museum, looking at exhibits of stuffed birds.
Courtesy of Magnolia Pictures

Originally published on Mon June 8, 2015 9:30 am

Roy Andersson just might be one of the most interesting oddballs in the world of film. His Hollywood fan base includes high-class auteurs like the Wachowski siblings, Darren Aronofsky and Alejandro González Iñárritu — but he's best known in his native Sweden.

Back in 1970, Andersson's first film, A Swedish Love Story, took Europe by storm. He was only 26. "It was a fantastic time for me," he recalls. "However, I was not very happy after that. I was a little depressed. My second movie was a flop in all senses. A very, very big flop."

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The Two-Way
7:28 am
Sat June 6, 2015

Official Death Toll In China's 'Eastern Star' Disaster Rises To Nearly 400

Rescuers work in the hull of the upright ship Eastern Star to launch rescue work in the section of Jianli on the Yangtze River, central China's Hubei Province, on Saturday.
Bai Yu Xinhua /Landov

Originally published on Sat June 6, 2015 12:10 pm

The death toll in the capsizing of a cruise ship in China's Yangtze River has risen to just under 400, making it the deadliest maritime disaster in seven decades in the country.

China's state-run Xinhua news agency says hundreds more bodies have been recovered since the overturned Eastern Star was righted on Friday, bringing the total confirmed dead to 396. Among the newly recovered bodies was that of a 3-year-old girl.

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Goats and Soda
6:29 am
Sat June 6, 2015

The Hidden World Of Cambodia's Sex Workers: New Risks, New Hope

When Cambodia's government closed the brothels, sex workers in Phnom Penh scattered to bars and entertainment venues.
Steve Sapienza for NPR

Originally published on Sun June 7, 2015 1:20 pm

In 2008, Cambodia passed a law that closed its brothels. The goal was to prevent human trafficking. But there was a tragic unintended consequence. It upended a government program designed to distribute condoms and screen for sexually transmitted diseases like HIV at brothels. When the sex workers scattered, there was no easy way to reach them.

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The Two-Way
4:29 pm
Fri June 5, 2015

Irish Soccer Details $7 Million FIFA Payment Over Handball

Robbie Keane scored in Ireland's controversial World Cup qualifying match with France on Nov. 18, 2009 — but the country was eliminated by the aggregate score of 2-1. Ireland's soccer association says FIFA paid 5 million euros — $7 million at 2010 exchange rates — over a blatant breaking of the rules by France.
Michael Steele Getty Images

A day after news emerged that soccer's world body paid Ireland not to protest a blatant handball by France's Thierry Henry in 2009, the Football Association of Ireland is releasing more details about the arrangement — including a copy of a signed deal.

FIFA paid the FAI more than 5 million euros — equal to around $7 million at the time of the transaction in January 2010 — so that the Irish would quit their plans for a legal appeal.

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Parallels
4:08 pm
Fri June 5, 2015

Who Are America's Suspected ISIS Followers?

An Islamic State fighter holds holds a rifle and the group's flag shortly after capturing the northern Iraqi city of Mosul in June 2014. Dozens of Americans have been accused of planning or heading off to the Middle East to join the group. Their individual cases are on the chart below.
Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Fri June 5, 2015 5:47 pm

More than two years after the self-proclaimed Islamic State burst on the scene, it is still difficult to quantify just how big the threat is in this country. Counterterrorism officials say nearly 200 Americans have traveled to Syria and Iraq, are thinking about doing so or have returned to the U.S. after spending time there.

NPR has learned that number of returnees in this country is nearly three dozen — but their cases remain sealed.

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Sports
4:07 pm
Fri June 5, 2015

Women's World Cup Soccer Kicks Off Saturday In Canada

Originally published on Fri June 5, 2015 5:47 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Remembrances
4:07 pm
Fri June 5, 2015

Tariq Aziz, Public Face Of Saddam Hussein Regime, Dies

Originally published on Fri June 5, 2015 5:47 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Middle East
4:07 pm
Fri June 5, 2015

Risky Gazans Begin Digging Out Smuggling Tunnels To Egypt Again

A young man walks by holes made by the Egyptian military to destroy smuggling tunnels connected to Gaza. The demolitions have put pressure on Hamas, the militant group that controls Gaza and has long counted on smuggling tunnels as its lifeline.
Ahmed Abd El Latif AP

Originally published on Sat June 6, 2015 9:57 pm

Just a couple of years ago, Gazans could get lukewarm Kentucky Fried Chicken — and nearly anything else — delivered from Egypt through commercial smuggling tunnels dug under the Gaza-Egyptian border.

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Politics
4:07 pm
Fri June 5, 2015

As Many As Six Candidates Murdered In Run Up To Mexican Elections

Originally published on Fri June 5, 2015 5:47 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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National Security
4:07 pm
Fri June 5, 2015

China Dismisses U.S. Allegations That It Was Behind Cyberattack

Originally published on Fri June 5, 2015 5:47 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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The Two-Way
2:48 pm
Fri June 5, 2015

Man Changes Name To 'Adam West' To Avoid Paying $336 Airline Fee

Adam Armstrong was using the name Adam West on Facebook — and now, it's his legal name. The 19-year-old chose to get a new passport rather than pay more than $330 in fees.
Facebook

It started with a joke: On Facebook, Adam Armstrong listed his name as Adam West, the actor who played Batman in the 1960s. But then his girlfriend's stepfather bought him a plane ticket with the West name on it — and the airline wanted $336 to change it.

Adam, who lives in Manchester, England, is 19 — and he really wanted to go on this trip to the resort island of Ibiza. So he simply became Adam West. It was cheaper to change his name and get a new passport than to pay airline Ryanair's fees.

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The Two-Way
1:25 pm
Fri June 5, 2015

11 Dead, 8 Missing After Avalanche On Mountain In Borneo

Hikers trapped on Borneo's Mt. Kinabalu on Friday after a magnitude-5.9 earthquake triggered avalanches that closed off the decent route.
Xinhua/Landov

Originally published on Sat June 6, 2015 1:12 am

Updated Saturday 1:45 a.m. ET:

A total of 11 bodies have been recovered after an earthquake triggered an avalanche on Borneo's highest peak. Guides have helped 167 stranded climbers to safety, and eight more are still missing, according to news reports.

The 137 climbers, including an unknown number of foreign tourists, were unable to descent Mt. Kinabalu in Malaysian Borneo. However, Masidi Manjun, the tourism minister for Sabah state on the island's northeast side, tweeted:

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Goats and Soda
12:14 pm
Fri June 5, 2015

Behind The Story: What Made NPR Look Into Red Cross Efforts In Haiti?

After the quake of 2010, a man stands on a rooftop yelling for any sign of his missing relatives in a Port-au-Prince neighborhood.
David Gilkey NPR

Originally published on Fri June 5, 2015 8:01 pm

Where did the money go? An NPR and ProPublica investigation has raised troubling questions about what happened to the hundreds of millions of dollars raised by the American Red Cross for earthquake relief in Haiti.

Goats and Soda posed a few questions to NPR correspondent Laura Sullivan about her work on this investigation.

What made you decide to look into the American Red Cross's earthquake recovery spending in Haiti?

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The Two-Way
11:31 am
Fri June 5, 2015

Tariq Aziz, Saddam's Foreign Minister, Dies At 79

Iraqi Foreign Minister Tariq Aziz in a photo from December 1998 as he stands at attention for the Iraqi national anthem at a conference in Baghdad. Aziz has reportedly died at age 79.
Peter Dejong AP

Originally published on Fri June 5, 2015 1:46 pm

Tariq Aziz, the man who became the public face of Iraqi strongman Saddam Hussein's regime, has died in custody 12 years after surrendering as Baghdad fell to invading U.S. troops, an Iraqi government official has confirmed. Aziz was 79.

The Associated Press reports the former foreign minister and deputy prime minister "died on Friday afternoon after he was taken to the al-Hussein hospital in the city of Nasiriyah, about 200 miles southeast of Baghdad, according to provincial governor Yahya al-Nassiri."

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The Two-Way
8:47 am
Fri June 5, 2015

Pakistan Officials: Most Arrested In Malala Yousafzai Attack 'Secretly Acquitted'

Malala Yousafzai poses for photographs in New York. Yousafzai survived being shot by the Taliban in 2012 because she advocated education for girls.
Frank Franklin II AP

In April we quoted Pakistani officials as saying that 10 men arrested in the near-fatal shooting of Pakistani youth activist Malala Yousafzai had been convicted in a secret trial and sent to prison for 25-year jail terms. Authorities now say that's not true — all but two of the men were "secretly acquitted" and set free.

The two men who weren't acquitted were actually handed life sentences, the officials say.

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The Two-Way
8:19 am
Fri June 5, 2015

India Orders Nestlé To Stop Selling Some Noodle Soup Products

Nestlé's Maggi instant noodles gained popularity in India as the snack of the middle class in the 1980s.
Chandan Khanna AFP/Getty Images

After wrestling with India's regulatory bodies over the safety of some of its products, Nestlé India says it will abide by a ban and pull its noodle soup products from shelves.

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Sports
4:28 am
Fri June 5, 2015

Women's World Cup Soccer Action To Begin Amid FIFA Scandal

Originally published on Fri June 5, 2015 6:58 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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National Security
4:14 am
Fri June 5, 2015

White House Invites Millennials To Thwart ISIS' Recruitment Efforts

Originally published on Fri June 5, 2015 6:58 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Latin America
4:06 am
Fri June 5, 2015

FIFA's Soccer 'Embassy' In Paraguay, Complete With Legal Immunity

The headquarters of the South American Football Confederation, or CONMEBOL, in Luque, Paraguay. The confederation has the status of an embassy, which includes legal immunity in Paraguay. Two former heads of CONMEBOL have been indicted in the FIFA scandal, accused of taking bribes and money laundering.
Norberto Duarte AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun June 7, 2015 5:14 pm

Experiencing a five-star hotel can sometimes feel like you've been transported to another country. Take the CONMEBOL Bourbon Hotel in Asuncion, Paraguay.

Acoustic music plays while the sun sparkles on the rooftop pool. The view from the top looks down onto the manicured grounds of CONMEBOL, the headquarters of the South American Soccer Federation, where a helicopter pad has pride of place. You could almost ignore the unpaved roads nearby in this, one of South America's poorest countries.

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Goats and Soda
2:35 am
Fri June 5, 2015

South Korea's MERS Crisis Exposes Public Distrust Of Leaders

South Korean school students put on face masks during a special class on the MERS virus at an elementary school in Seoul.
Jung Yeon-je AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri June 5, 2015 6:58 am

More than a thousand schools are shut down in South Korea, a response to rising fears over MERS — Middle East respiratory syndrome. The virus has now infected 41 people, of whom four have died, since the South Korean outbreak began May 20th, and it's exposing widespread distrust among South Koreans that their leaders can adequately handle the crisis.

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National Security
6:18 pm
Thu June 4, 2015

Chinese Hackers Breach Government Personnel Office Computers

Originally published on Thu June 4, 2015 7:50 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Goats and Soda
6:06 pm
Thu June 4, 2015

Viral Superspreader? How One Man Triggered A Deadly MERS Outbreak

Patient one: A businessman brought the Middle East respiratory syndrome to South Korea in early May. Since then, he has likely spread the virus to more than 20 other people. Several of those have passed the virus onto others.
Maia Majumder/Health Map

Originally published on Fri June 5, 2015 8:20 am

An outbreak of a deadly virus in South Korea has set off alarms across the region.

In the past week, South Korea's confirmed cases of the Middle East respiratory syndrome have more than tripled to 41, with at least three deaths. About 1,600 people are quarantined and more than 1,000 schools are closed.

It's the largest outbreak of MERS outside Saudi Arabia. And researchers around the world have been trying to figure out why the outbreak in South Korea has gotten so large, so fast.

Now researchers have a clue: a superspreader event.

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Sports
4:57 pm
Thu June 4, 2015

Former Goalie Says U.S. Women's Soccer Team Looks 'Incredibly Strong'

Originally published on Thu June 4, 2015 7:50 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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