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Updated at 5:49 a.m. ET

Theresa May will step down as prime minister of the United Kingdom on June 7, she said Friday at No. 10 Downing St.

She came to the job in 2016 after U.K. voters backed plans to exit the European Union in a referendum. For the following three years, she attempted to navigate the difficult and complex process of making that happen.

"I feel as certain today as I did three years ago that in a democracy, if you give people a choice, you have a duty to implement what they decide," she said. "I have done my best to do that."

A 55-year-old Utah man who told his son that he was "so blessed" to achieve his lifelong dream of reaching the summit of Mount Everest, collapsed and died during his descent on Wednesday.

The family of Donald Lynn Cash of Sandy, Utah, said the software sales executive and mountaineer apparently died of a heart attack. His body is not recoverable.

Botswana's government is lifting a ban that protected its elephants from being hunted, part of a series of decisions that could have lasting impacts on the country's conservation efforts.

British voters are expected to deliver a humiliating defeat to Prime Minister Theresa May's Conservative Party in European Parliament elections on Thursday. Many who want Britain to pull out of the European Union are angry with May, who is under heavy pressure to resign, for failing to deliver on the Brexit referendum result nearly three years ago.

Updated at 5:54 p.m. ET

Prosecutors are bringing a slate of new charges against Julian Assange, including alleged violations of the Espionage Act, raising the stakes for his prospective extradition from the United Kingdom.

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The Ebola outbreak in the Democratic Republic of Congo keeps getting worse. One of the main reasons - armed groups continue to attack Ebola responders. Today, the United Nations secretary-general created a new position, an emergency Ebola response coordinator, whose sole job is to keep health workers safe. It's a recognition that the only way to stop this outbreak is to stop violence against Ebola workers. NPR's Nurith Aizenman is here to talk about why. Nurith, we're 10 months into this outbreak. Where do things stand at this point?

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Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi has been reelected and his party is poised to take more seats than the 2014 election, signaling India's support of the strongman leader and his Hindu nationalist ideology.

The voting lasted almost six weeks to accommodate nearly 900 million people who were eligible to cast their votes.

On Thursday, the ballots were counted and results showed Modi's Bharatiya Janata Party, or BJP, winning more seats than any other party.

In northeast Syria, an overcrowded detention camp is home to more than 73,000 people who lived in the former ISIS caliphate. Almost three-quarters of the al-Hol camp residents are children — born to Syrian, Iraqi and other foreign parents who flocked to the ISIS caliphate over the five years it ruled territory here.

In recent visits to the camp, NPR was told of babies dying from malnutrition and disease, and found women collapsed by the side of the road.

Updated Friday at 10:40 a.m. ET

One morning in 2011, Rémy Louvradoux went to his management job at the French telecommunications company where he had worked for 30 years. At 7 a.m., alone in the parking lot of his office near Bordeaux, in southwestern France, he killed himself.

His son, Raphael Louvradoux, told the news site L'Obs that his father wrote the company a letter two years before taking his life.

How will aviation authorities around the world go about certifying Boeing's 737 Max as airworthy again? How soon can the troubled plane be cleared to fly passengers again?

Those are the central questions up for discussion as about five dozen aviation safety officials representing more than 33 countries meet in Fort Worth, Texas.

Updated at 6:15 p.m. ET

The Trump administration will provide $16 billion in aid to help keep farmers afloat as they reel from the yearlong trade war between the U.S. and China, the latest sign that the world's two largest economies are still far from striking a long-term trade agreement.

The bulk of the support, or about $14.5 billion, is direct aid to farmers, which producers will start to see some time this summer, Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue told reporters in a briefing on Thursday.

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It looks like a landslide victory for Prime Minister Narendra Modi in India. Votes are still being counted today after elections that lasted six weeks. NPR's Lauren Frayer has been following all of it, and she joins us live from Mumbai.

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Early vote results show a landslide victory for Prime Minister Narendra Modi in India. Votes are being counted today after elections that lasted six weeks. NPR's Lauren Frayer has been following it and joins us from Mumbai.

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How do you end America's longest war? That's a task the Trump administration has set for itself in Afghanistan. This week, the administration told Congress about peace talks. And NPR's Michele Kelemen has been asking what they heard.

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Months ago, President Trump demanded that Congress make a choice. They could work with him or fight him; legislate or investigate. He wouldn't do both.

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The measles outbreak got so bad in Manila, Philippines, that San Lazaro Hospital had to set up tents in the parking lot, the courtyard and even the landing at the top of the stairs outside the pediatric ward to house patients.

"This ward would only accommodate 50 patients," says Dr. Ferdinand de Guzman, the head of family medicine at the hospital. "But at the height of the outbreak, [there were] 300 patients per ward."

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NPR's Noel King talks to Mireille Paquet, professor of political science at Concordia University in Montreal, about how effective merit-based immigration has been on Canada's immigration system.

Updated on Thursday at 4:30 p.m.

The Alabama Historical Commission says a wrecked ship off the Gulf Coast is the Clotilda, the last known vessel to bring people from Africa to the United States and into bondage.

At the Robert Hope Community Center in Mobile, Ala., on Wednesday, researchers unveiled their discovery to descendants of the people on that fateful voyage. "They had been waiting for this for a long time," Alabama Historical Commission Chairman Walter Givhan, a retired major general, told NPR. "They were jubilant."

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