U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

Public hearings begin next week for Keystone XL pipeline water crossing permits. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is considering permits for pipeline construction through South Dakota, Montana, and Nebraska.

The Corps is holding hearings by phone because of the COVID-19 pandemic. Montana comments are scheduled for Monday, Sept. 28. South Dakota's are set for Sept. 29, and Nebraska's are on Oct. 1.

U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

The Keystone XL pipeline hit a snag earlier this year when its water-crossing permit from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers was vacated by a Montana federal judge.

The Corps asked the U.S. Supreme Court for an emergency lifting of that order, but the high court left it in place.

The fast-track permit was a problem because it did not require extensive environmental review. Now TC Energy has applied to the Corps, as well as to the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, for permits that will undergo public scrutiny.

Chris Jordan-Bloch, Earthjustice

Last month a federal judge ordered that the Dakota Access pipeline should be shut down and drained by Aug. 5.

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers quickly appealed, and the D.C. Court of Appeals stayed the order.

Now the appeals court has affirmed that the pipeline does not have to be shut down immediately, but it lets stand the lower court's finding that the Corps violated federal law when it failed to complete an environmental impact study.

Victoria Wicks has this story for SDPB.

Sierra Club

The United States Supreme Court has refused to reinstate water crossing permits for the Keystone XL pipeline. That decision puts construction on hold until the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers completes a thorough environmental impact study of the pipeline project.

A Sierra Club lawyer says the Corps should have done that assessment years ago.

Victoria Wicks has more of the story for SDPB.

Natural Resources Defense Council

A Montana federal court order vacating certain water crossing permits for oil and gas pipelines will stand for now.

The Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals has denied a request from the Trump administration, TC Energy, and other energy companies to lift the judge's order pending appeal.

An attorney with the Natural Resources Defense Council says that ruling effectively halts Keystone XL pipeline construction.

SDPB's Victoria Wicks reports.

A Montana federal court order that vacated water crossing permits for oil and gas pipelines will stand for now. The Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals has denied a request from the Trump administration, TC Energy, and other energy companies to lift the judge's order pending appeal.

As a result, the Keystone XL pipeline is not permitted to cross 688 bodies of water on its route through Montana, South Dakota, and Nebraska, at least until the appeal has played out.

Montana Federal Court

The Keystone XL pipeline now crosses the border between Alberta and Montana. TransCanada installed an 80-foot pipe in the middle of April, with completion of more than a mile of pipe planned. But with permits in question and lawsuits still going, the rest of construction is done piecemeal. One small construction site is near Philip, where workers are unloading pipe and build a worker camp. SDPB's Victoria Wicks has this report.

Cassi Alexandra for NPR

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers has been ordered to complete a meaningful environmental impact study on the Dakota Access Pipeline.

A federal judge in the D.C. district issued that order on Wednesday, March 25, and will consider whether to shut the pipeline down until the study is done.

A lawyer for the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe says it's about time.

Listen to audio for the rest of the story.

SDPB's Victoria Wicks has this report.

In The Moment ... Images Of The Past / Big Bend Dam

Nov 6, 2017
U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

In The Moment ... November 6, 2017 Show 214 Hour 2

This week's Images of the Past feature focuses on a film that shows the different stages of construction of the Big Bend Dam on the Missouri River near Ft. Thompson. 

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers began construction in 1959.  The dam project was completed in 1966.

SDPB's Brian Gevik speaks with Rick Clark, superintendent of the Missouri National Recreational River in Yankton about the challenging aspects of trying to manage a major river system.