Shawn Bordeaux

SD Legislative Research Council

House State Affairs has voted against allowing tribes to seek reimbursement for expenses associated with pipeline protests.

Last year's legislature established the PEACE fund to collect money for state or political subdivisions whose budgets might be stressed if the Keystone XL pipeline is built and protests rise up.

The committee voted 9 to 4 against including tribes in that group.

Listen to audio for the rest of the story.

SDPB's Victoria Wicks has this report.

SD Legislative Research Council

South Dakota's 2020 "riot boosting" law has been approved by the state House and is on its way to the Senate. The controversial bill is a rewrite of last year's law, found largely unconstitutional by a federal judge. Advocates say this version ensures safe and peaceful protests, but opponents say it still deters free speech and assembly and pits government against tribes. For more of this story, click on the audio arrow.

SDPB's Victoria Wicks has this report, with rotunda audio contributed by Lee Strubinger.

Lee Strubinger SDPB

South Dakota's refurbished riot legislation has been passed by House State Affairs. The bill rewrites last year's "riot boosting" law designed to squelch pipeline protests. The committee heard testimony on Wednesday, Feb. 12, and although there was strong opposition by the Speaker of the House, the bill passed on a 10-3 vote.

Most proponents say the law keeps protests peaceful. But opponents say the bill still steps on rights of free speech and assembly.

SD Legislative Research Council

The Rosebud Sioux Tribe Utilities Commission heard from politicians and activists this week at its two-day hearing on the Keystone XL pipeline. The gathering was held at Saint Francis. TC Energy (formerly TransCanada) was notified of the hearing but did not send a representative.

Commissioners heard from leaders of several tribes, as well as State Senator Red Dawn Foster and State Representative Shawn Bordeaux.

In The Moment ... March 8, 2018 Show 292 Hour 1

As the 2018 Legislative Session winds up its final week of business, we talk with state Senator Kevin Killer and state Representative Shawn Bordeaux about the triumphs and disappointments of the session. We also discuss the drive to rename Todd County to Sicangu Oyate County.

Victoria Wicks

Pending approval, the Keystone XL pipeline will pass across the state of South Dakota, through Buffalo, Murdo and Winner. The pipeline also crosses the river near the Cheyenne River Reservation.

A protest against the Dakota Access Pipeline near Standing Rock in North Dakota went on for months.
That’s prompted the state to prepare for potential demonstrations. It starts with one piece of legislation.

SDPB

South Dakota governor Dennis Daugaard says relations between tribes and the state made continued progress in 2016.

During his annual State of the State address, Daugaard pointed to tax agreements and conservation efforts on the reservations as examples.

But one lawmaker says the governor failed to address the major issue in Indian country right now…

Representative Shawn Bordeaux is a Democrat from the Rosebud Reservation.

Representative Shawn Bordeaux joins Dakota Midday to discuss the the naming of Black Elk Peak, and how we can get beyond conversations about race and on to conversations about making lives better in South Dakota.

Courtesy photo / Mark Trahant

A Native American political observer says 2016 could be a record year for the number of native candidates on the ballot across the country.

Mark Trahant says just under 100 candidates are running for office.

Mark Trahant is a journalism professor at the University of North Dakota.

He says this could be a record year for the number of native people running for office.   He’s tallying up the number of native candidates nationwide, but he says since this is the first time a count like this has been done, he says he’s cautious about making a superlative statement.