Senator Mike Rounds

SD Congressional Leaders Call For IHS Audit

Jul 7, 2016

South Dakota’s representatives in Congress say an audit of Indian Health Service operations would lead to solutions for improving care for Native people.

Officials say one of the focuses of an audit would be the formula for how IHS funds different regions.

The Indian Health Service employs roughly 15,000 people.  U-S Senator Mike Rounds, says out of those only 750 are doctors who actually see patients.  

Congress Debating Defense Spending

Jun 12, 2016

Congress is working on the National Defense Authorization Act. It passed the U.S. House and is currently before the Senate. Not everyone agrees on what the measure should look like.

Sen. Rounds: We Must Pay Attention To IHS Issues

Jun 9, 2016

U.S. Senator Mike Rounds says officials in his office are working on an in depth analysis of the Indian Health Service. He’s a co-sponsor of legislation addressing IHS issues in the Great Plains area, including employer recruitment and retention and accountability. Rounds says it’s critical that Tribes are included in the decision making process.  

Rounds Proposes Cyber War Act

May 25, 2016

Federal officials warn that cyber-attacks are becoming greater threats to American security. U.S. Senator Mike Rounds is sponsoring an act that defines cyber war.  Proponents say it helps America defend itself, some opponents say there is no one size fits all strategy for war.

Dakota Midday: Sen. Rounds Proposes Cyber Security

May 23, 2016

US Senator Mike Rounds joins Dakota Midday for an extended conversation about his Cyber Act of War Act of 2016. The bill is designed to require the current administration to define a cyber act of war. Senator Rounds talks about the nation's vulnerability to cyber-attack and why he believes the time is overdue to give the US armed forces the authorization and ability to defend against cyber-attack.

Kealey Bultena / SDPB

A new rule from the U-S Department of Labor changes the responsibilities of certain financial advisors. Some people including US Senator Mike Rounds say the law puts a greater burden on Americans and limits available advice. Others say everyday investors likely won’t see much of a difference.

Fiduciaries are people charged with putting someone else’s interests ahead of their own. That means financial fiduciaries must recommend money moves in clients’ best interests.

Kealey Bultena / SDPB

A Friday deadline for a federal funding bill is likely moving to next week. Members of the US Senate approved a late-night Wednesday deadline to give negotiators extra time. House lawmakers will likely vote on the extension Friday.

One South Dakota lawmaker says the quick extension makes sense. United States Senator Mike Rounds says he supports the move to give leaders a few extra days to decide what an appropriations measure includes. He says negotiators are making progress but are not sharing information.

Dakota Digest for December 4, 2015

Dec 4, 2015
Kealey Bultena / SDPB

On this week's edition of Dakota Digest, Senator John Thune wants part of the Affordable Care Act repealed, and the deadline approaches for Medicare Part D. Also, a group of volunteers in Rapid City is dressing up as animated characters to help bring happiness to kids. All of this and more on this week's Dakota Digest.

Dakota Digest for October 23, 2015

Oct 23, 2015

On this week’s edition of Dakota Digest, South Dakota is set to lose its participation in the EB-5 program, and Senator Rounds won’t lobby to keep it. Also this week, Senator Thune hopes President Obama has a change of heart with the National Defense Authorization Act, and a Sioux Falls Roosevelt teacher has won a national award.

Be sure to follow South Dakota Public Broadcasting on social media by following our accounts on twitter: @SoDakPB, @SDPBNews, and @SDPBSports

U.S. Senator Mike Rounds

Members of the United States Congress have less than one month to come to an agreement on raising the debt ceiling. US Representatives are organizing to elect a new leader, and the process to move the debt limit higher starts in their chamber.

United States Senator Mike Rounds says he believes Congress can reach an agreement on increasing the debt ceiling by its deadline. He says men and women in the Senate acknowledge they have to raise the amount of money the federal government can borrow. 

South Dakotans in Congress are standing against the nuclear deal with Iran. Lawmakers are back in Washington, DC after a recess, and leaders are grappling with how to handle support and disapproval of the agreement.

Thursday United States Senate Democrats blocked a vote of disapproval on the Iran nuclear deal. Still Senator Mike Rounds says he does not support the compromise.

Rounds for Senate

A United States Senator from South Dakota says lawmakers have less than two weeks to figure out how to fund the federal government. September 30th is the deadline to appropriate money to government programs.

Senator Mike Rounds says he doesn’t support simply extending appropriations already in place without other changes attached. SDPB’s Kealey Bultena asks him about that position.

The US Senate is debating the Every Child Achieves Act, which replaces No Child Left Behind. Senator Mike Rounds hopes an amendment to the measure helps improve the quality of education in Indian Country.

Three people who represent South Dakota in the nation’s capital are reacting to a US Supreme Court decision to uphold the Affordable Care Act. Thursday six of the nine justices agreed that people are still eligible for insurance subsidies using a federal health insurance exchange. Thirty-four states do not have state-run marketplaces.

As the FCC moves forward with a controversial decision to regulate internet providers in the name of fairness, commissioners must answer to a South Dakotan. In fact all three people who represent the state in Washington D-C say they stand against the agency’s move to expand its power. Yet that doesn’t mean they have the same reason for resistance.

Three members of Congress advocate for the interests of South Dakotans in the nation’s capital, and all three condemn the Federal Communication Commission’s vote to expand its regulatory power to internet service.

Pages