Sanford Health

Kealey Bultena / SDPB

Thousands of South Dakotans must change doctors and clinics if they want their health insurance to cover the care. Starting January 1, 2017, Sanford Health no longer accepts Avera insurance including DakotaCare, and Avera Health in South Dakota isn't taking Sanford Health Plan insurance. That leaves some people who can't afford to pay out of pocket with little choice, and it requires others to leave trusted medical providers to find new services that work with their insurance.

Kealey Bultena / SDPB

Avera Health is removing its South Dakota hospitals, clinics, and physicians from the Sanford Health Plan. The change means people who have Sanford insurance won’t have coverage if they go to Avera’s providers. It’s the latest development in a health care clash among the state’s two largest health systems.

Sanford Health

Eugene Hoyme, M.D., and Amy Elliott, Ph.D. discuss new FASD Diagnostic standards. The two were part of a group of experts who developed clinical guidelines for diagnosing fetal alcohol spectrum disorders based on an analysis of more than 10,000 individuals involved in studies of prenatal alcohol exposure.

Elizabeth "Betty" Meyer served as a key leader during South Dakota's revolution in access to breast cancer screenings and breast health care. She is part of the 2016 class of inductees into the South Dakota Hall of Fame.

Meyer joins Dakota Midday host Lori Walsh to talk about her career, how an introvert becomes a leader, and how an army of women changed the landscape of healthcare in South Dakota.

Sarah Kuhnert is a survivorship nurse with the mySurvivorMentor program at Sanford Health in Sioux Falls. mySurvivorMentor is a new program that is currently available to breast cancer patients. It links survivors to walk the cancer journey with newly diagnosed patients. 

Cancer, says Vice President Joe Biden, is personal.

He spoke at the South Dakota Cancer Moonshot Summit via simultaneous, nationwide livestream, calling for cooperation, innovation, and accountability in cancer research and treatment nationwide.

SDPB’s Director of Radio Cara Hetland brings you scenes from the Summit, including impassioned comments from the vice-president: "Time matters. Days matter. Minutes matter."

The United States Preventive Services Task Force has issued new recommendations indicating mental maternal illness is more common than previously thought. The panel suggests all women should be screened for depression and mood disorders during and immediately after pregnancy.

Dr. Rajesh Singh, a psychiatrist with Sanford Health Psychiatry and Psychology Clinic discusses the significance of the new guidelines and the difference appropriate screening can mean for mothers, fathers, and children.

Vascular surgeon and research scientist Dr. Patrick Kelly is working to develop a next-generation medical device that can save patients thousands of dollars and prevent repeat surgeries. He joins Dakota Midday host Lori Walsh to talk about his partnership with Gopinath Mani, Ph.D., and the culture of innovation in South Dakota.

While people brave Black Friday on the hunt for deals, an expert says toy shoppers should make sure their great buys are appropriate for particular kids. Not all toys are made for children of different ages. Plus some choices offer kids a better opportunity to learn and grow.

Amy Hiesinger is a family life educator with Sanford Health. She says people should consider a child’s age and capabilities when shopping for gifts. Hiesinger says little children respond well to interactive gifts.

Dakota Midday: Treating Aortic Aneurysms

Nov 19, 2015
South Dakota State University

Dr. Stephen Gent, Associate Professor in the Mechanical Engineering Department at South Dakota State University in Brookings, is part of a Sanford research team that has developed a better stent for treating aortic aneurysms.  Gent used computational fluid dynamics modeling to model blood flow through the new and improved stent.  Gent visited with Dakota Midday guest host Jackelyn Severin.

Steven F. Powell, MD is a medical oncologist and clinician scientist at Sanford Health, based in Sioux Falls, SD. Dr. Powell is also an assistant professor in Internal Medicine at the University Of South Dakota Sanford School Of Medicine. He serves as a sub-investigator for Sanford Health’s National Cancer Institute Community Oncology Research Program (NCORP). In addition to this, he serves as a principal investigator for several industry-sponsored and investigator-initiated studies. Dr.

With one in eight U.S. women diagnosed with breast cancer in her lifetime, the odds are high that at some point most students’ lives are impacted by this disease. During Breast Cancer Awareness Month, Texas Instruments (TI) and Sanford Health have introduced a new “STEM Behind Health” activity called “Breast Cancer: When Good DNA Goes Bad” to help students better understand breast cancer and explore the math and science concepts that are helping to find a cure.

 In the activity, Dr.

Dakota Midday: Sanford Imagenetics

Sep 22, 2015
Sanford Health

Sanford is building a state-of-the-art facility to integrate genomic medicine with innovative primary care.  As medicine incorporates tailored plans based on genes, Dr. Gene Hoyme, chief of genetics and genomic medicine at Sanford Health, says additional training is necessary to shape the next wave of medicine.  He joined guest host Kealey Bultena to detail new programs at area schools that will prepare students for this element of healing.  He also talked about Sanford's new residency focusing on medical genetics.

Local Oncologists Use New Cancer Therapies

Aug 24, 2015

Doctors in South Dakota are using recently-approved drugs to help patients fight cancer. Former President Jimmy Carter’s melanoma diagnosis highlights treatment that includes both radiation and IV immune therapy. Similar treatments may work for cancer patients in South Dakota.

Melanoma is one type of skin cancer. Doctor Marcus Frohm says about 75,000 people will get melanoma this year, and traditional cancer treatments like chemotherapy and radiation may be necessary.

Sanford Health

Customized cancer treatment is the future of cancer therapy, but analyzing the unique genetic make-up of individuals can take an enormous amount of time. It typically takes weeks for clinicians to analyze each genetic mutation, but IBM Watson Genomic Analytics in some cases can complete the process in just a few minutes and produce a report, including treatment recommendations. The ambitious goal is personalized medicine for cancer patients everywhere based on their unique genomic profile.

Dakota Midday: Tourette Syndrome

Apr 8, 2015
Sanford Health

Tourette Syndrome is a neurological disorder that causes uncontrollable tics, such as repeated eye blinks, heard and shoulder jerks or unwanted sounds. Signs and symptoms of Tourette Syndrome typically show up between ages two and twelve. As many as one in five children may have a tic disorder. But recognizing Tourette’s can be difficult.

Sanford Health

Next week, SDPB-TV airs the latest Ken Burns documentary, Cancer the Emperor of All Maladies. The three-part, six-hour series covers the first documented appearances of cancer thousands of years ago through today’s battles to cure, control and conquer the disease.

Sanford Health

75 years ago, Canton, South Dakota native Ernest O. Lawrence accepted the Nobel Prize in Physics for the invention and development of the cyclotron particle accelerator. Among the uses of  the cyclotron today is in medicine to make relatively short-lived radioisotopes for imaging and research.

Dr. Christopher Fischer is a nuclear medicine specialist at Sanford Health in Sioux Falls. He joined Dakota Midday and discussed the use of the cyclotron in nuclear medicine and cancer diagnosis and treatment.

According to the Brain Injury Association of America, an estimated 2.4 million children and adults in the United States sustain a traumatic brain injury each year. The association sets aside every March as Brain Injury Awareness Month.

Fetal Alcohol Syndrome Disorder Study

Dec 29, 2014
Sanford Health

Dr. Gene Hoyme is internationally known for his work with Fetal Alcohol Syndrome Disorder. He also serves as president of Sanford Research and chief academic officer for Sanford Health. Hoyme has led FASD research studies in South Africa for the past 15 years. He co-authored a study that shows nearly five-percent of U.S. children may be affected by FASD.  The study explored the incidence of FASD among first grade students in Sioux Falls.

Sanford USD Medical Center Designated As Ebola Hospital

Nov 24, 2014

In the unlikely event a case of Ebola pops up in South Dakota there is now a plan of action and a designated health care facility to diagnose and treat any sick patients.

The plan may also help the state deal with any future outbreaks of infectious disease.

Click play below to hear more.

Sanford Health

A national study published this summer suggests that three-dimensional mammograms are better at detecting invasive tumors and can avoid false alarms which lead women to get extra breast cancer scans that turn out normal.

The study, published in the Journal of the American Medical Association, was led by Sarah Friedewald, M.D., of Advocate Lutheran Hospital in Park Ridge, Illinois, and co-authored by Thomas Cink, M.D., a breast radiologist for Sanford Health in Sioux Falls.  It compared mammograms from over 450,000 women at 13 hospitals, including 30,000 at Sanford. Dr.

Sanford Health

The National Cancer Institute of the National Institutes of Health is giving Sanford Health more than $7.1 million for cancer research. The five year grant is for recruiting participants for clinical trials, quality of life studies and cancer care delivery research. It’s one of 53 awarded nationwide through the institute’s Community Oncology Research Program. Dr. David Pearce is vice president and chief operating officer of Sanford Research.

Sanford Health

Sanford Health has partnered with Chronix Biomedical in a new cancer study. The basis of the study is the ability to map out whole genomes of cancer cells. The big question: can this ability be used to predict how cancer patients will respond to different therapies? Dr. John Lee of Sanford Health joined the program to discuss the study, along with Chronix Biomedical CEO Dr. Howard Urnovitz and Professor Ekkehard Schutz, Chief Techonology Officer of Chronix. 

STD Awareness Month

Apr 24, 2014
Your STD Help

April marks the annual observance of STD Awareness Month.  Individuals, health care providers and community-based organizations are encouraged to bring a renewed sense of focus to their awareness and prevention of sexually transmitted diseases.  Studies show that people who have STDs such as gonorrhea, herpes and syphilis are more likely to get HIV compared to people who are STD-free.  According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 20 million new STDs, including 50,000 new HIV infections, occur every year.  Mary Beth Johnson, CPN, leads Sanford Health's downtown Sioux Falls cl

First Annual Sanford FASD Symposium

Mar 7, 2014

The first annual Sanford Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders Symposium was held at the research center Thursday, February 27. Dr. Gene Hoyme, Chief Academic Officer at Sanford Health and President and Senior Scientist with Sanford Research, and Kenneth Warren, PhD who is the acting director of the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA), discussed the symposium.

Rare Disease Day

Feb 25, 2014

Rare Disease Day is an observance held on the last day of February to raise awareness of rare diseases and improve access to treatment and medical representation for individuals with rare diseases and their families.  Liz Wheeler is the director of Coordination of Rare Diseases at Sanford (CoRDS).  CoRDS and Sanford Children's Health Research Center is hosting the 4th Sanford Rare Disease Symposium Thursday and Friday at the Sanford Center in Sioux Falls.  CoRDS is a registry that stores information on individuals affected by a rare disease to help accelerate research into rare diseases.  T

What Is Multiple Myeloma?

Feb 13, 2014
NBC

Former NBC Nightly News anchor and Yankton native Tom Brokaw announced Tuesday that he has been diagnosed with cancer.  In a statement posted on NBCNews.com, Brokaw said he has multiple myeloma, a cancer affecting blood cells in the bone marrow.  Brokaw, who turned 74 last Thursday, said doctors are optimistic about his prognosis.  There is no cure for multiple myeloma, but treatments are available that slow its progression.  Diagnosed in August, Brokaw has continued to do work for NBC, including contributing to the coverage of the Winter Olympic Games.  Sanford Health oncologist Dr.

Increasing Cancer Cases

Feb 11, 2014
Sanford Health

According to a new report from the World Health Organization, cancer cases are expected to surge 57% nationwide in the next 20 years.  According to Christopher Wild, director of the International Agency for Research on Cancer, the rising incidence of cancer will require a heavier focus on preventative health policies.  Sanford Health oncologist Dr.

Sanford Imagenetics

Feb 7, 2014
KDLT

Sanford Health recently announced a $125 million gift to fund the genomic initiative for internal medicine. The gift launches Sanford Imagenetics. Dr. Eugene Hoyme, President of Sanford Research, joined Innovation to discuss genetic testing for patients. For more information, go to: sanfordhealth.org/imagenetics.

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