Programming

Jackie Hendry

For a group of Vermillion high schoolers, a winning robotics team takes passion, perseverance, and a really dedicated mom.

In January, the team ranked 8th in the world at a competition in Omaha. Last weekend, the students won the state robotics championship. During a team practice earlier this month, students set their sights on their next goal – a ticket to the world championship in Kentucky this spring.

These teenagers in the Rolfes family basement aren’t just socializing. They’re part of the robotics team and they’re practicing...stacking cones.

Kealey Bultena / SDPB

The International Coding Competition in Rapid City and recent international hacking events have prompt people to consider coding. It provides the scaffold for computers and smartphones and apps. Educators must decide how kids can learn code, what they should understand, and when they should start.

Take a peek inside this coding classroom. The room is warm. It’s afternoon. The school year draws to a close, and sixth-grader Adysen Moet plays a video game.

The world final of a computer programming competition is coming to Rapid City. The International Collegiate Programming Contest (ICPC) happens May 20-25, 2017. Groups of college seniors and first-year grad students use their computer skills and critical thinking abilities against the best from around the globe.

Richard Gowen is President of Excellence in Computer Programming, Inc. He discusses the caliber of the competition and its impact on people outside the computer science community.

Charles Michael Ray

A South Dakota science professor has been instrumental in bringing the International Collegiate Programming Contest to Rapid City this coming May. The event includes the top collegiate programmers from around the world. 

SDSM&T Computer Science professor Dr Antonette Logar is talking about the programming competition and other topics including her work on artificial intelligence and her efforts to support young women in math, science and engineering careers. 

Erin Mairose

A camp in Sioux Falls this summer is teaching kids how to program electronics and video games. Using computer code, kids learn how to program a motion sensor, range finder, and a laser to create a homemade security system.

15 middle school boys eagerly punch computer keys, and plug electronic pieces into a microcontroller board. They are learning how to upload code onto their device to create certain effects, such as a motion sensor that emits different sound depending on how far away it detects an object.