Pilot

www.dakotastories.org

In The Moment ... October 28, 2019 Show 688 Hour 1

For 59 years Chuck and Grace Childs made Rapid City their home before moving to Minnesota in 2017. Chuck Childs died Sunday in Tracy, Minnesota at the age of 99.

In The Moment ... May 5, 2017 Show 087 Hour 1

Rapid City Police Department

UPDATE:   A criminal charge against a SkyWest Airlines pilot accused of being under the influence of alcohol before a flight at a South Dakota airport has been dismissed.

The Pennington County State's Attorney’s office filed for dismissal of the case because blood drawn from the pilot hours after a preliminary breath test showed no measurable alcohol in his system.

www.battlestory.org

WWII RAF fighter pilot John Wilkinson is speaking this Saturday at the regular meeting of the Black Hills Veterans Writing Group.  Wilkinson, now an American citizen living in Spearfish, flew the historic Spitfire and Hurricane fighters.  He joined Dakota Midday to share some of his experiences and discuss his flying technique.  Wilkinson's presentation on Saturday begins at 9:30 a.m. at Ellsworth Air Force Base's South Dakota Air and Space Museum.

NSU Honors WWII Pilot And Alum With Statue

Jun 12, 2014
Aberdeen News

As the second highest-scoring Navy ace in U.S. history, South Dakota's Capt. Cecil E. Harris' achievements as a fighter pilot during World War II garnered him local and national recognition. Harris shot down 24 enemy warplanes in 81 days while never taking a single bullet in his own plane. The Cresbard native and Northern State University Alumni's accomplishments prompted his alma mater's decision to honor him with an 8-foot bronze statue in his likeness.

Bernie Hunhoff, publisher of South Dakota Magazine, and Vermillion pilot Denny Martens talk about the latest issue of South Dakota Magazine. The cover story in the July/August issue of South Dakota Magazine, "South Dakota's Wild Blue Yonder," is devoted to the adventures in the state's skies in the years since the first recorded flight in South Dakota on March 9, 1911. Denny Martens flew for the University of South Dakota for 41 years and writes about the night his plane hit a flock of snow geese.