Patients

Kealey Bultena / SDPB

National health experts are looking to South Dakota strategies as they discuss rural health care. The US Department of Health and Human Services showcased Avera’s telemedicine efforts with viewers around the country. It was part of an effort about National Rural Health Day.

Avera’s eCare services use high-quality video and audio to connect Sioux Falls physicians with small town hospital staff. This allows doctors and nurses to collaborate on treating rural patients in real time.

Kealey Bultena / SDPB

A new agreement preserves health insurance options for 26,000 State of South Dakota employees. State leaders and Sanford Health negotiated to cover state employees at an in-network cost. That allows some DakotaCare patients to see Sanford doctors without huge price increases.

Kealey Bultena / SDPB

Avera Health is removing its South Dakota hospitals, clinics, and physicians from the Sanford Health Plan. The change means people who have Sanford insurance won’t have coverage if they go to Avera’s providers. It’s the latest development in a health care clash among the state’s two largest health systems.

Kealey Bultena / SDPB

A United States Senator and a state lawmaker agree that the federal government is failing to provide adequate health care to Native Americans. United States Senator John Thune and South Dakota State Senator Troy Heinert see different solutions to ongoing problems with the Indian Health Service.

U-S  Senator Thune has legislation in Congress aimed at comprehensive reform for federal health services for Native Americans. He says the bill makes it easier to fire ineffective IHS leaders, examines whistle-blower protections, and requires fiscal accountability so patient care funds actually make it to patients.

Kealey Bultena / SDPB

First-year medical students are tapping into new technologies that support health providers in rural areas. Avera’s eCare facility provides live video access to specialists and emergency physicians to support providers in different circumstances. Some students say it makes them more confident in pursuing work in rural medicine. 

Medical students in short white coats surround a mannequin. Three volunteers in blue paper gowns take direction from a physician on a TV screen who walks them through life-saving techniques.

Researchers hoped a new compound treatment is a miracle drug to reverse the effects of Alzheimer's disease. But that's not the case for more advanced patients. So now they're looking at using the treatment on early onset of the disease. Dr. Bill Fuller with Avera Behavioral Health discussed the research study of mild Alzheimer patients.  To find out more about the study call Gail at Aver Behavioral Health at 605-322-3075.

Om Perumal, who is the new head of the pharmaceutical sciences department, and assistant professor Hemachand Tummala have developed drug-delivery systems through their work with the Translational Cancer Research Center, one of the most successful of the 2010 Governor Research Centers. Perumal's research focuses on drug-delivery systems for breast, prostate and skin cancer as well as other skin diseases. He has formed a startup company, Tranzderm Solutions, which has had an off-campus lab since 2012 to commercialize his technologies.