Oglala Lakota

Keith Braveheart: Art In The Age Of COVID

May 29, 2020
SDPB

In The Moment … May 29, 2020 Show 828 Hour 1

Remembering Chuck Trimble

Mar 12, 2020
SDPB

In The Moment ... March 12, 2020 Show 772 Hour 2

Journalist Charles Trimble died this month at the age of 84. He was an Oglala Lakota journalist, former leader of the National Congress of American Indians, and founder of the American Indian Press Association.  He is remembered in print and in life by his friend and colleague Tim Giago. Tim Giago is founder of the first independently owned Native American newspaper in the United States, and founder of the Native American Journalism Association. 

Moment In Sound: juQ

Jan 17, 2020
SDPB

In The Moment ... January 17, 2020 Show 736 Hour 1

juQ is the performance name of Oglala Lakota singer and songwriter Wanbli Ceya. He's an artist and an advocate working to get the language and culture of his people back to life, to get them to sobriety, and to get them to heal. It's the dynamic that drives him wherever he goes.

juQ joins us after having just released his part Lakota language album, "nya", which is the 2nd chapter to his life story, "The Oglala Wolf Puppy with PTSD.” In this segment, you'll hear some music from his November release.

News: Sep 14 - 20

Sep 20, 2019
SDPB

Welcome to this week’s news podcast. This week you’ll hear about The Oglala Lakota Tribe becoming the first in the region to pass laws adding protections for LGBT people, House Minority Whip Erin Healy and House Speaker Steve Haugaard join us to talk pre-k, the Political Junkies discuss STAR Academy and more.

Eagle Bull Blazes Trail In Architecture

Sep 12, 2018
Chris Laughery

In The Moment ... September 12, 2018 Show 420 Hour 1

Tammy Eagle Bull is the first Native American woman in the United States to become a licensed architect. 

An Oglala Lakota Nation member who was raised in Aberdeen, Eagle Bull gives the keynote lecture, "Sovereignty Through Design," Thursday at the Annual Institute of Architects South Dakota convention.

Chynna Lockett

In The Moment ... August 2, 2018 Show 392 Hour 2

How does an Oglala Lakota Holy Man still change the way we see the world today?

Today we consider the life and legacy of Nicholas Black Elk.

You are invited to the South Dakota Hall of Fame Nicholas Black Elk Symposium today, Thursday, August 2, at tha SDPB Black Hills Studio in downton Rapid City.

David Emery, CEO of Black Hills Energy and grandson of James Emery, Miles Beacom and Brian Hagg, members of the South Dakota Hall of Fame, joined In The Moment with a preview of the event. 

OFFICE OF GOVERNOR DENNIS DAUGAARD

The Oglala Sioux Tribal Council submitted a resolution to state lawmakers on Thursday opposing the nomination of Don Kirkegaard to Secretary of Education. Council members are concerned about his connections to the GEAR Up Controversy.

The concerns were brought to the State-Tribal Relations Committee during its second unofficial meeting in 24 hours.

e4e.org

In The Moment ... June 29, 2017 Show 125 Hour 2

 

More than 95-hundred public school teachers work within South Dakota's boundaries. Sometimes, they spend more time with kids during the week than parents. State Secretary of Education Melody Schopp says the community should elevate teachers with dignity and respect. SDPB's Kealey Bultena begins our discussion about attitudes in teaching with Schopp, who says teaching is a noble profession. Then, Lori Walsh and Kealey Bultena continue the conversation with insight from South Dakota teachers.

Meth, according to Sgt. Dale McCabe, is a drug without barriers. McCabe has worked with the Rapid City Police Department since 1990, overseeing all violent crime cases the past eight years. Rapid City has seen a record number of homicide and violent crime cases in 2015, directly connected with increased illegal drug use. McCabe joined Dakota Midday to discuss meth, criminal justice reform, and how to the cycle of meth addiction and crime through deterrence, education and prevention.

Lakota Hemp Farmer Fights For The Right To Plant

Jul 30, 2015
Charles Michael Ray

A Lakota farmer is fighting for the right to plant a new crop of industrial hemp on Pine Ridge.
 
Alex White Plume began growing hemp in the late 1990’s after the Oglala Sioux Tribe legalized the crop for industrial use.   
 
But drug enforcement agents soon seized the White Plume crop.   He spent several years fighting in federal court and is under an injunction restricting his ability to plant again, despite new provisions in the Farm Bill that open the door for the crop.