Native American

Supreme Court Split On Native Court Jurisdiction

Jun 27, 2016
Collection of the Supreme Court of the United States

A recent Supreme Court case involving tribal sovereignty ended in a tie. The Dollar General Corp. v. Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians ruling has implications for Natives and non-Natives.

http://www.southdakotamagazine.com/about

South Dakota Magazine Managing Editor John Andrews previews the July/August issue - everything from a Native American christening ceremony to the Black Hills.

Lakota Language Program Looks To Keep Customs Alive

Jun 20, 2016
Lakota Language Consortium

The Lakota Summer Institute is a three week long program that hopes to build lifelong learners of the Lakota language. Held at Sitting Bull College in Fort Yates, North Dakota, officials from the institute say they want to give people a reason to learn a language that so few speak. 

Collection of the Supreme Court of the United States

The U.S. Supreme Court has reinstated the conviction of a domestic abuser in Indian Country. A USD law professor says the case highlights the disparity between the right to counsel for Native and non-Native offenders. In tribal court, Native Americans aren’t guaranteed the right to an attorney, like they are in state and federal court.

SDPB

Lori Walsh speaks with Bill Hoskins. The Old Courthouse Museum in Sioux Falls is hosting an exhibit opening reception for “George Catlin: Life Among North American Indian Tribes” on June 23 from 5 to 7 p.m. Catlin was a painter, author, and traveler who specialized in documenting the lives of indigenous people in Dakota Territory and beyond. The Siouxland Heritage Museums house a collection of Catlin’s original work. Director Bill Hoskins joins Dakota Midday host Lori Walsh to talk about the exhibit and Catlin’s legacy.

BHSU Hosts Indigenous Women’s Conference

Jun 9, 2016
BHSU

An indigenous women’s organization is targeting justice issues for Native people, including the Indian Child Welfare Act, environmental protection and human trafficking.

The North American Indian Women’s Association (NAIWA) conference starts June 12 in Spearfish.

Jace DeCory, a member of the Cheyenne River Sioux tribe, uses a mix of Lakota and English to explain the theme of the North American Indian Women’s Association conference.

Kealey Bultena / SDPB

A United States Senator and a state lawmaker agree that the federal government is failing to provide adequate health care to Native Americans. United States Senator John Thune and South Dakota State Senator Troy Heinert see different solutions to ongoing problems with the Indian Health Service.

U-S  Senator Thune has legislation in Congress aimed at comprehensive reform for federal health services for Native Americans. He says the bill makes it easier to fire ineffective IHS leaders, examines whistle-blower protections, and requires fiscal accountability so patient care funds actually make it to patients.

Tate Walker

Lori Walsh interviews  writer and journalist Taté Walker.  Walker discusses how pop culture appropriates Native American identities and cultures.  From the hyper sexualized Indian maiden to the savage male warrior, Walker deconstructs the stereotypes and provides solutions as well as insight into who is doing representation right.

Crazy Horse School is receiving a federal grant worth $107,631 to help students cope with suicide on the Pine Ridge Reservation. This is the third grant from the US Department of Education to Pine Ridge schools after tribal leaders declared a state of emergency following a string of suicides.

Project SERV grants target schools where kids experience significant violent or traumatic events. The latest funding adds two counselors at Crazy Horse School in Wanblee to help restore the learning environment.

Secretary John King leads the US Department of Education.

Jodi Archambault Gillette, former special assistant to President Barrack Obama for Native American Affairs, will receive an Honorary Doctorate from Black Hills State University on Saturday, May 7 at 10 a.m. during commencement ceremonies.

Gillette will also present a special lecture Friday, May 6 at 1 p.m. at BHSU. She joins Dakota Midday for a conversation about her lifelong advocacy for families and children, how the traditions of her youth continue to impact her work, and the importance of increasing visibility of Native American issues at the highest level of government.

Bison Could Become National Mammal

May 3, 2016
Courtesy Wind Cave National Park

Bison could soon become the country’s National Mammal. The US House and Senate passed the National Bison Legacy Act. It’s awaiting President Obama’s signature.

The GEAR UP program in South Dakota is now operating from Black Hills State University. The education effort aims to prepare Native American students for college. Most recently GEAR UP is tied to accusations of wrongdoing as former leaders face criminal charges. Despite the challenges, the program is under new leadership and moving forward.

Incoming high school students from schools participating in GEAR UP are eligible to apply for a three-week program promoting college readiness and culture.

Sarah Deer is a MacArthur Fellow, a legal scholar, and an author. She discusses her 2015 book "The Beginning and End of Rape: Confronting Sexual Violence in Native America" with Dakota Midday host Lori Walsh.

Kealey Bultena / SDPB

A grand jury has indicted three people for felony crimes related to a Native American education program. State leaders say people within GEAR UP and Mid-Central Education Cooperative used the programs to steal more than one million dollars. Two of them died in a murder-suicide in September. Authorities announced charges against three other leaders last month.  

Wrestling Volunteers Banned From Future Events

Apr 12, 2016

Two volunteers who made racially charged comments at a youth wrestling tournament in Aberdeen are no longer allowed work future Amateur Athletic Union Events. The comments were captured on a video stream during one of the matches.

Kealey Bultena / SDPB

The attorney for one of the people charged with felonies related to the Mid Central Education Cooperative in Platte says the state is using his client as a scapegoat. The investigation involves crimes connected to Mid Central and a program called GEAR UP.

All Lakota Language News Website Launches

Mar 24, 2016
www.woihanble.com

If you like to get your news in Lakota you can now do so online. A new all Lakota language website called Woihanble.com is now up and running. The word Woihanble translates to dream in English. The site is written completely in Lakota. It features news stories from tribal nations across South Dakota.

The website Woihanble is one of the latest efforts to in South Dakota revitalize the Lakota language. It translates local stories from news outlets that cover South Dakota reservations from English to Lakota.

Jenifer Jones / SDPB

Lawmakers in Pierre support two programs aimed at Native American education. One measure seeks to help people who want to finish college courses so they can teach in Native American schools. The other sets up a pilot program to combine innovative cultural teachings with standard subjects.

Kealey Bultena / SDPB

Each legislative session, some major issues seem to take the spotlight in Pierre – and education is dominating this year’s conversation. Much of SDPB’s coverage relates to funding schools and teachers, because lawmakers are trying to find ways to fairly and adequately fund education. Despite a goal to provide the same opportunity for all kids by doling out the matching funding for students, children walk into classes facing a wide range of challenges. A visit to one Sioux Falls school reveals some of those differences.

Bill Ends Offensive School Names, Mascots

Feb 22, 2016
Jenifer Jones

A bill that creates a process to ban racially charged school or athletic team names, mascots, or nicknames, is moving forward in the South Dakota Legislature.

This year’s State-Tribal Relations Day at the South Dakota State Capitol focused on honoring veterans. The event is intended to expand cooperation between the state and tribes, but it’s not the first time that Native American issues have been at the forefront this legislative session. There is discussion about how Medicaid expansion could benefit the Indian Health Service, and earlier this session a tribal chairman delivered the first State of the Tribes Address. Leaders say state-tribal relations are moving in the right direction.

Jenifer Jones

A state Senate panel is endorsing education plans that focus on supporting Native American students. One of those measures funds programs that focus on incorporating Indian culture and language into standard subjects. 


Photo by Victoria Wicks

A researcher from USD spent 18 months studying dynamics between the Rapid City Police Department and indigenous community members. Tuesday night he presented his findings to a full auditorium of city residents. Results show that the Native population is larger than census figures would have it, and there are arrest factors that have skewed the statistics.

Kealey Bultena / SDPB News

A visible member of the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe says work between Indians and the rest of the state is not done. While much of the country took Monday off for Columbus Day, South Dakotans celebrated Native American Day. Leaders made the decision to change the holiday years ago. One man says some people still don’t use the holiday’s proper name.

JR LaPlante spent nearly four years as South Dakota’s first Secretary of Tribal Relations. He says changes made in 1990 were not answers to Native-white relations, but starting points. He says issues still exist.

The Journey Museum and Learning Center invites the public to a special Learning Forum that examines the  1868 Fort Laramie Treaty and introduces perspectives of the document as it applies today in 2015.  Dr. Craig Howe, founder of the Center for American Indian Research and Native Studies, will lead the conversation, providing insight into what is not known by many about the 1868 Fort Laramie Treaty.  Attendees will have an opportunity to ask questions during the forum scheduled for Sunday, October 11 at 2:00 p.m.

www.bhsu.edu

Black Hills State University has the largest proportion of Native American students in South Dakota's state universities.  But BHSU President, Dr. Tom Jackson, says efforts to increase the diversity of students in higher education are still needed. 

Jackson discussed the topic with SDPB's Charles Michael Ray. 

The Indian Health Service is giving nearly $1 million to prevent methamphetamine use and suicide in South Dakota. The funds are part of more than $13 million awarded nationwide.

 

One of South Dakota’s US Senators says he wants provisions in a new education bill that help address suicide among Native American populations. Senator John Thune says he’s introduced two amendments to the Every Child Achieves Act. 

US Senator John Thune says suicide on American Indian Reservations is an epidemic. He says the death rate for Native American youth is four times the national average. 

Victoria Wicks

The Rapid City Police Department now has a cultural advisor on staff to research issues and develop ways of addressing them. Twenty-nine-year-old Vaughn Vargas is now in the process of working with the community to identify an advisory committee to help the PD in navigating race relations.

Victoria Wicks

The American Indian population in Rapid City is about 12 percent, but Native people account for almost 60 percent of arrests. And because of societal factors such as poverty, homelessness, addiction, mental illness, and unemployment, Native people end up staying in jail when more fortunate people would be released. Tuesday SDPB’s Victoria Wicks sat in on a Native American Outreach meeting of officials in the process of applying for a MacArthur grant to fund solutions.

Pages