Money

Chynna Lockett

In The Moment ... May 21, 2019 Show 580 Hour 2

Rick Kahler has been helping people with their finances for decades. As part of In The Moment's ongoing financial therapy conversations, Kahler discusses money disorders.

Kahler has written several financial therapy books including Wired for Wealth. He's founder of Kahler Financial Group in Rapid City.

SDPB

In The Moment ... February 25, 2019 Show 522 Hour 1

Today we introduce a new segment on In the Moment: Morning Macro with Joe Santos. It's a chance to break down the numbers (and break apart the rhetoric) regarding fiscal policy and the economy.

Professor Joseph Santos is with the Department of Economics at South Dakota State University. Each week Santos provided lessons on macroeconomics that tie in to our In the Moment conversation. Find them on his blog Schooled. 

Chynna Lockett

In The Moment ... February 25, 2019 Show 522 Hour 1

Can the money messages you received in childhood interfere with your relationship to wealth as an adult? Rick Kahler is a wealth advisor and owner of Kahler Financial Group. He's co-authored four books on the psychology of money, including "The Financial Wisdom of Ebeneezer Scrooge." And "Wired for Wealth."

He joins us to discuss money scripts, the role of denial in fianncial planning, and how financial health impacts emotional and physical health.

In The Moment ... January 4, 2018 Show 249 Hour 2

Nobody likes to fail, but that's exactly what's happening for South Dakota high schools when it comes to personal finance education.

John Pelletier is director of the Champlain College Center for Financial Literacy. South Dakota high schools have received an F on the "2017 Report Card on State Efforts to Improve Financial Literacy in High Schools."

We talk financial literacy, public policy, and how financial education can impact an economy.

Kealey Bultena / SDPB

State lawmakers say they want to adjust parts of last year’s education overhaul. The governor says the current reform is working, because a sales tax for teacher pay is pushing average educator salaries up.  

One piece of vast K-12 education reform from 2016’s legislative session involves declining enrollment. Schools now must use the final number of students enrolled in the fall to determine their share of state dollars. Before they could average the previous two years to ease into lower funding.

South Dakota Fiscal Health In Good Position

Jan 3, 2017
Kealey Bultena / SDPB

South Dakota is in a strong financial position going into the new year.
 
That’s the summary of the state’s annual end of the year financial report.
 
Deputy Commissioner for the Bureau of Finance and Management Jim Terwilliger points to the state’s recent triple-A rating and fully funded pension system…
 

Kealey Bultena / SDPB

The "shop local" cause has a high-profile advocate this holiday season. South Dakota’s governor is encouraging people to do their last-minute shopping in communities across the state instead of with retailers outside of South Dakota.

Governor Dennis Daugaard is popping into different retail shops and restaurants in downtown Sioux Falls. He asks a local restauranteur what the best meal on the menu is. The owner says the governor can't go wrong.

Daugaard says he’s finished shopping for Christmas gifts in Pierre and in Sioux Falls.

Kealey Bultena / SDPB

Governor Dennis Daugaard says South Dakota has to revise this year’s budget. That’s because he says the state is not bringing in as much money as projected.

Daugaard says the trend since the start of the fiscal year is not good.

Kealey Bultena / SDPB

A new agreement preserves health insurance options for 26,000 State of South Dakota employees. State leaders and Sanford Health negotiated to cover state employees at an in-network cost. That allows some DakotaCare patients to see Sanford doctors without huge price increases.

Kealey Bultena / SDPB

Thousands of South Dakotans must change doctors and clinics if they want their health insurance to cover the care. Starting January 1, 2017, Sanford Health no longer accepts Avera insurance including DakotaCare, and Avera Health in South Dakota isn't taking Sanford Health Plan insurance. That leaves some people who can't afford to pay out of pocket with little choice, and it requires others to leave trusted medical providers to find new services that work with their insurance.

Kealey Bultena / SDPB

South Dakota’s largest cities are embarking on wastewater projects to account for reliability, growth, and regulations. The City of Sioux Falls is putting $35 million into two major sanitary sewer projects officials say should last nearly a century. Rapid City leaders say their community needs $62 million for system upgrades.

Pumps churn at a construction site in northeastern Sioux Falls. Crews are working to lower the water table so they can bury large pipe for more than two miles. The diameter of the new pressure pipe is three-and-a-half feet.

Kealey Bultena / SDPB

A new rule from the U-S Department of Labor changes the responsibilities of certain financial advisors. Some people including US Senator Mike Rounds say the law puts a greater burden on Americans and limits available advice. Others say everyday investors likely won’t see much of a difference.

Fiduciaries are people charged with putting someone else’s interests ahead of their own. That means financial fiduciaries must recommend money moves in clients’ best interests.

Kealey Bultena / SDPB

Three people involved with an education cooperative that contracted with state government face criminal charges. South Dakota’s attorney general announced charges of falsifying evidence, conspiracy, and grand theft related to Mid Central Education Cooperative.

Mid Central Education Cooperative gained statewide attention in September when one of its leaders died violently. An investigation revealed that Scott Westerhuis killed his wife and four children before lighting the family home on fire and shooting himself.

Jenifer Jones

Lawmakers in the State Senate approve of Governor Dennis Daugaard’s proposal to change the way the state funds public education. Senate Bill 131 includes significant shifts in school funding. Most state senators endorse the plan, but some have reservations about the overhaul.

Kealey Bultena / SDPB

Each legislative session, some major issues seem to take the spotlight in Pierre – and education is dominating this year’s conversation. Much of SDPB’s coverage relates to funding schools and teachers, because lawmakers are trying to find ways to fairly and adequately fund education. Despite a goal to provide the same opportunity for all kids by doling out the matching funding for students, children walk into classes facing a wide range of challenges. A visit to one Sioux Falls school reveals some of those differences.

Ed Funding Plans Compete At Statehouse

Feb 18, 2016
Jenifer Jones

As a bill to increase the sales tax to benefit teacher pay trudges through the Statehouse, some Republican lawmakers are floating an alternative plan that doesn’t raise taxes. House Bill 1182 adds one half percent to the state sales tax. Lawmakers twice used a procedural rule to delay the bill. It’s on this afternoon’s House calendar.

Jenifer Jones / SDPB

A new perspective on education funding is working its way through the State Capitol, but some say it’s an uphill battle. This year Governor Dennis Daugaard is proposing an overhaul of the way the state funds education. His plan includes a half-penny increase in the sales tax and a change in the way schools get funding. The plan requires two-thirds of the state’s lawmakers to approve a tax increase in an election year.

Kealey Bultena / SDPB

State lawmakers are trying to figure out the best way to fund education in 151 different South Dakota school districts. And that might be especially difficult when it comes to small schools. Bills with the language of Governor Dennis Daugaard’s plan to increase teacher pay are not yet filed in Pierre. Right now lawmakers are working off of explanations from the governor’s State of the State speech and the Department of Education. Members of the legislature are determining what revamping the K-12 funding formula means for small schools and whether leaders are starting in the right place.

State lawmakers working on policies to increase teacher pay are weighing accountability and local control. The two concepts clash as legislators look at a plan to raise the sales tax for teacher salary increases – even among Republicans who control both chambers of South Dakota’s legislature.

A poll commissioned by Governor Dennis Daugaard indicates at least 71 percent of likely voters approve of his plan to raise the sales tax one half-cent to increase teacher salaries.

State representatives support a measure that takes South Dakota out of a regional coalition. State leaders entered the Midwestern Higher Education Compact in 2008. A push is now underway to end the contract with 11 other states.

South Dakota is part of the Midwestern Higher Education Compact. Proponents say the Board of Regents has gained from the membership. State lawmakers say enrollment has two primary advantages: it offers more buying power on technology purchases and savings on property insurance.

Kealey Bultena

Public school administrators are telling teachers a plan to increase the average teacher salary to more than $48,500 doesn’t mean pay raises across the board. Governor Dennis Daugaard wants to boost education funding by raising the sales tax by a half cent. 

South Dakota’s Blue Ribbon Task Force determined that teacher pay in South Dakota is behind surrounding states by thousands of dollars. Now lawmakers must decide on the right mechanism for funding K-12 education and how much money school districts should receive.

Kealey Bultena / SDPB

Leaders in Pierre are laying out the governor’s new plan for dispensing state tax dollars to schools. This week’s discussion includes details about proposed caps to school districts’ reserve funds. 

South Dakota school districts are allowed to keep reserve funds. They’re basically savings accounts for general fund dollars. Part of Governor Dennis Daugaard’s plan to alter the funding formula for K-12 schools includes limiting the amount of money schools can squirrel away.

SF School Leader Optimistic About Edu. Plan

Jan 11, 2016
Kealey Bultena / SDPB

The leader of the state’s largest school district says South Dakota has an opportunity to restore value to careers in education. Governor Dennis Daugaard is set to reveal his vision for school funding during Tuesday afternoon's State of the State address. One education leader says the Governor’s proposal is more than a spending plan.

Kealey Bultena / SDPB

Lawmakers from districts in and around Sioux Falls are previewing their priorities for the 2016 legislative session. Wednesday morning a couple hundred people attended an annual breakfast from the Sioux Falls Chamber of Commerce to hear what lawmakers anticipate in the coming weeks.

Education

State of South Dakota

Stakeholders examining education funding in the state are working on final recommendations to the governor. Thursday is the final meeting of South Dakota’s Blue Ribbon Task Force. Members met throughout the summer and fall to understand challenges related to K-12 education.

Kealey Bultena / SDPB

A poll from AARP South Dakota shows most people who are over age 50 want the state to restrict how much money payday lenders can charge. The membership organization paid for the survey from Alan Newman Research. Poll results are from the end of September and beginning of this month.

Phone calls to 904 older South Dakotans show many people agree the law should cap the interest payday lenders and car title loan companies charge customers. Sarah Jennings is the state director for AARP South Dakota.

U.S. Senator Mike Rounds

Members of the United States Congress have less than one month to come to an agreement on raising the debt ceiling. US Representatives are organizing to elect a new leader, and the process to move the debt limit higher starts in their chamber.

United States Senator Mike Rounds says he believes Congress can reach an agreement on increasing the debt ceiling by its deadline. He says men and women in the Senate acknowledge they have to raise the amount of money the federal government can borrow. 

Kealey Bultena / SDPB

The conversations of Dakota Midday on Tuesday, September 29, 2015 are woven together with an economics thread.

Workforce initiatives can't rely on the quality of jobs in South Dakota if they want to attract people from other regions. Research shows the way younger people choose careers is different than you might expect. J. Mac Holladay is the founder and CEO of Market Street Services based in Atlanta, Georgia. He explains why place may matter more than a certain kind of employment.

Kealey Bultena / SDPB

Investigators are trying to piece together factors that left a family of six dead in a murder-suicide. Fire engulfed a home near Platte one week ago, and responders found six bodies inside. Preliminary autopsy results show Nicole Westerhuis and four children died of shotgun wounds. Authorities suspect husband and father Scott Westerhuis killed them before shooting himself.

Scott Westerhuis was business manager for an organization called Mid Central Education Cooperative. Recent audits reveal financial issues with grant money that funnels to the group.

Kealey Bultena / SDPB

Farmers and ranchers in South Dakota must decide whether to save the money they make from crops and livestock or reinvest it. The growing season is well underway for South Dakota farmers, and ranchers are watching markets as they raise their animals. 

Record commodity prices for corn and soybeans are gone, and that has some farmers keeping their money in the bank instead of spending it on upgrades and new equipment. South Dakota Secretary of Agriculture Lucas Lentsch says growers remain cautious.

Pages