Medicine

Sanford Health

Sex is not a dirty word. Dr. Laurie Landeen joins In the Moment host Lori Walsh for a conversation about sexual health, breaking conversational tabboos, and how healthy intimacy can help you live longer. 

Education and healthcare reporting on SDPB is supported by Regional Health, helping patients and communities live well

Artificial Intelligence In Health Care

Apr 15, 2019
NPR

In The Moment ... April 15, 2019 Show 556 Hour 2

Computers can play chess and drive cars, but can they diagnose pneumonia or read a mammogram?

NPR Science Desk correspondent Richard Harris is hosting an ongoing series examining the rise of artificial intelligence in the field of health care. The first two installments aired on April 1.

Harris discusses how the field is developing, how patients are responding and what the immediate future holds for AI in medicine.

In The Moment ... April 4, 2019 Show 549 Hour 2

Medicine at War is the topic for On Call with the Prairie Doc. The program airs Thursdays at 7:00 p.m. Central on SDPB-TV.

Dr. Richard Holm joins In The Moment to preview each episode.

Education and healthcare reporting on SDPB is supported by Regional Health, helping patients and communities live well.

In The Moment ... February 14, 2019 Show 516 Hour 2

Dr. Richard Holm previews tonight's On Call With the Prairie Doc on SDPB-TV (7:00 p.m. Central).

In The Moment ... January 11, 2018 Show 254 Hour 2

Dr. Richard Holm joins In the Moment for his weekly preview of On Call with the Prairie Doc. This week's conversation talks about the history of the television program and where to find accurate medical information.

In The Moment ... October 23, 2017 Show 204 Hour 1

Dr. William Elmquist is a distinguished Professor of Pharmaceutics at the University of Minnesota. Today, he is the keynote speaker for the 27th Annual Pharmacy Fall Convocation. His talk is called "Targeted Central Nervous System Delivery to Treat Brain Tumors: Many Challenges, Many Opportunities." He joins us to talk research, hope, and why he thinks his job is the greatest in the world.

Kealey Bultena / SDPB

Biotechnology is a booming business, and South Dakota companies are competing with organizations around the globe. Local scientists pioneer medicine, agriculture, manufacturing, and research. A researcher-turned-business developer outlines his assessment for area investors and scientists in an extended interview.

South Dakota Biotech's annual summit brought professionals together for the discussion, and some future scientists help equip fellow kids.

Sioux Falls researchers are employing light to open blood vessels. The US Food and Drug Administration is green-lighting a trial that could help patients who suffer from peripheral vascular disease. Doctors say more than 8 million people live with the condition.

Research leaders say the FDA okays a study that uses NVS to treat PVD. Acronyms aside, leaders have the go-ahead for a clinical trial. It may determine whether a new combination of a medical device and a drug can help people with leg problems related to their blood vessels.

Kealey Bultena / SDPB

A national study examines whether medication approved for one cancer treats other forms of the disease.

Sanford Health locations are part of the clinical trial. It's called the Targeted Agent and Profiling Utilization Registry Study (TAPUR).

Dr. Steven Powell is the principal investigator for Sanford Health. He says precision cancer therapy uses patients' genetics and traits of individual cancers to treat disease. He says the study may expand options for treating patients who have advanced cancers.

Andrew Bork / SDPB

First responders and medical professionals are assessing their performance during a mock helicopter crash. They held the drill Tuesday morning. Crews began by pretending they had Avera helicopter on the Sanford landing pad and people were hurt. 

Kealey Bultena / SDPB

Governor Dennis Daugaard gets to decide whether certain medical professionals must collaborate with doctors for licensing. Right now certified nurse practitioners and nurse midwives must have an official connection to a physician to get their own licenses. Now lawmakers endorse a bill changing the requirement.

Both chambers of South Dakota’s legislature support Senate Bill 61.

Kealey Bultena / SDPB

A drug that reverses opioid overdose is available in South Dakota without a prescription. The option is a response to national trends in painkiller abuse. Pharmacists at Walgreens can dispense the drug. Starting February 1st, Avera and Hy-Vee pharmacies also offer the medication to keep in case of emergency.

A medicine called naloxone reverses the toxic effects of taking too many painkillers. It’s the generic drug for the brand-name Narcan.

Dr. Matthew Stanley with Avera Health says using the nasal spray is the first step in saving someone who overdoses on opioids.

Roger Bultena family

Some stories stay with a reporter long after they've aired. A recent story about organ donation from SDPB's Kealey Bultena has her reconsidering how she listens to stories from her grandfather. She wrote about her personal experience growing up with tales from her grandpa's corneal transplants in a post called The Vision To Listen, and she talks with Lori Walsh on In The Moment about how her reporting has changed her personal perspective.

Kealey Bultena / SDPB

The first holiday season after someone dies is often difficult for people who loved him or her. It’s full of traditions and gatherings that used to include an important person now gone. One woman says she’s channeling her grief into improving the lives of others because that’s what her son did. 

Melody Hilbert raised three children. Jonah was the second born, sandwiched between two other boys with "J" names.

Kealey Bultena / SDPB

People grieving the loss of family members this holiday season are finding comfort in others who’ve experienced loss. Families and friends of people who chose to donate organs before they died connected at an event to honor and remember.

Leaders at Avera hold a program and prayer before talking with people who knew someone who died and chose to donate his or her organs.

Jonah Hilbert died in April at age 31 after struggling with alcoholism. He was still able to donate tissue and his corneas.

Kealey Bultena / SDPB

Some patients with medical needs who don’t require the rigorous attention of hospitals have another option for discharge. Avera in Sioux Falls is now operating a transitional unit to serve people who can leave the hospital but can’t go straight to a nursing home, rehab, or back home.

The State of South Dakota doesn’t allow health providers to add beds for more people in nursing homes, but leaders are making an exception for transitional care.

Kealey Bultena / SDPB

South Dakotans don’t have answers to many of their health care questions. Between federal administration changes and decisions at the state level, the issue of delivering quality, cost-effective health care is bathed in uncertainty. Local advocates say patients should not panic; instead they say people can better understand the factors at play nationally and within South Dakota – and know that people are fighting for their wellness.

Dakota Midday: Polio Treatment In South Dakota

Nov 21, 2016
Sanford Health

This week's Images of the Past feature focuses on the history of polio treatment in South Dakota. Dr. Lon Kightlinger, South Dakota state epidemiologist, and Dr. Archana Chatterjee, pediatric infectious disease specialist with Sanford Health, discuss the history of polio treatment in the state and take a look at current challenges regarding communicable disease threats and vaccinations.

Kealey Bultena / SDPB

A Lakota man is celebrating three decades teaching life lessons to elementary school students through Native American dance. Dallas Chief Eagle started working as an artist-in-residence for schools in the mid-1980s. Today he’s still sharing Lakota culture with school children across the state.

In his performance, Dallas Chief Eagle rapidly moves his feet as he glides across a gym floor, picking up plastic hoops. He links them together in a long line. Chief Eagle tosses the chain into the air, and spins the hoops over the heads of screaming elementary school students.

Dakota Midday: SDHOF Inductee Dr. Richard Holm

Aug 24, 2016

Dr. Richard Holm, host of On Call with the Prairie Doc on SDPB-TV, is a 2016 inductee into the South Dakota Hall of Fame. He visited with Dakota Midday host Lori Walsh to discuss practicing medicine during the age of electronic medical records, a legacy of educating the public, and how to give your doctor permission to step away from protocols and see you as an individual human being. Holm is a Full Clinical Professor of Medicine at the University of South Dakota Sanford School of Medicine.

Erin Mairose

The VA Health Care System is undertaking $20 million dollars in construction and renovations on its facility in Sioux Falls. Officials hope the additional space will help doctors provide better care to area veterans.

Darwin Goodspeed is the Director of the VA Health Care System in Sioux Falls. He says not having space for doctors to see patients is a limiting factor in providing care. 

Kealey Bultena / SDPB

A United States Senator and a state lawmaker agree that the federal government is failing to provide adequate health care to Native Americans. United States Senator John Thune and South Dakota State Senator Troy Heinert see different solutions to ongoing problems with the Indian Health Service.

U-S  Senator Thune has legislation in Congress aimed at comprehensive reform for federal health services for Native Americans. He says the bill makes it easier to fire ineffective IHS leaders, examines whistle-blower protections, and requires fiscal accountability so patient care funds actually make it to patients.

Kealey Bultena / SDPB

Avera is launching the first South Dakota-based study to track twins. The health organization’s Institute for Human Genetics has partnered with the world’s leading twin registry out of the Netherlands for seven years. Now the Avera Twin Register will collect and analyze DNA from twins.

Doctor Dave Kapaska is the regional president and CEO of Avera McKennan in Sioux Falls. He highlights how people are fascinated by multiples as he introduces two Avera physicians who are twins and mixes them up in the process.

Jason McEntee facilitates the Literature and Medicine Program at the Sioux Falls VA Medical Center. As they wrap up another session, McEntee (Associate Professor and head of the English department at SDSU) joins Dakota Midday host Lori Walsh to explore the intersection between war, literature, and the healing professions. 

When asked about reading recommendations, McEntee gave these:

Kealey Bultena / SDPB

First-year medical students are tapping into new technologies that support health providers in rural areas. Avera’s eCare facility provides live video access to specialists and emergency physicians to support providers in different circumstances. Some students say it makes them more confident in pursuing work in rural medicine. 

Medical students in short white coats surround a mannequin. Three volunteers in blue paper gowns take direction from a physician on a TV screen who walks them through life-saving techniques.

Informed Consent Abortion Bill Passes

Mar 7, 2016
Charles Michael Ray

House Bill 1157 has cleared the state legislature.

The measure requires medical doctors to inform a woman who is undergoing a drug-induced abortion that she can stop the procedure by not taking a second pill. 

Kealey Bultena / SDPB

State leaders are talking weekly with federal officials as they work on a change that could prompt Medicaid expansion in South Dakota. Governor Dennis Daugaard says federal leaders need to settle their policy before South Dakotans can decide whether the state can financially support as many as 55,000 more people on Medicaid.

The Medicaid expansion discussion typically falls along party lines. Democrats push for the state to accept federal dollars and change the rules to make more people eligible for the program, while Republican lawmakers and the governor says it’s too expensive.

Kealey Bultena / SDPB

The deadline looms for seniors who want insurance plans to help cover the cost of prescription drugs. Monday is the last day to enroll in or change Medicare Part D insurance plans. One expert says seniors should find out whether they can benefit from prescription drug coverage, even if they’re already enrolled.

Medicare Part D plans are private health insurance from private companies that are subsidized by the federal government. That means seniors pay for the drug plans, but they don’t have to cover the full cost of the insurance out of pocket.

Kealey Bultena / SDPB

Avera Health is buying insurance organization DakotaCare. Company leaders are not revealing the purchase price. Talks started two weeks ago, and representatives for both entities could reach a final deal by the end of this month. Leaders say customers and employees likely won’t notice changes in the short term.

The board chair for DAKOTACARE says health insurance reform can be good for consumers but difficult on insurance companies. Doctor Kevin Bjordahl says sometimes making insurance affordable for a patient puts a strain on insurance providers.

Kealey Bultena / SDPB

Avera’s work to personalize cancer treatment could help people around the world. Leaders for the health system made the announcement Tuesday that the genomic oncology team is joining with the Worldwide Innovative Networking Consortium to participate in research and clinical trials. Now internationally renowned cancer expert Doctor Brian Leyland-Jones and Avera’s Center for Precision Oncology Director Casey Williams talk about the potential that exists in the new partnership.

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