Mark Winegar

Victoria Wicks

Activists are gathering in Rapid City to protest the "riot boosting" law passed at the end of the 2019 legislative session. The legislation is the subject of a hearing to be held on Wednesday, June 11, at the federal courthouse in Rapid City.

At the request of Governor Kristi Noem, lawmakers pushed the bill through to address protests against the Keystone XL pipeline. It holds protest supporters civilly and criminally liable if a riot breaks out.

Several groups sued in federal court to stop that law from going into effect.

Two controversial bills addressing the cost of hosting pipelines have landed on the governor's desk ready for Kristi Noem's signature.

One law sets up a fund to pay for the pipeline-related costs incurred by state and local governments.

The other introduces the term "riot boosting" and links the actions of rioters to the organizations that support their causes.

Lee Strubinger / SDPB

Governor Dennis Daugaard says he wants out of state think tanks to stop experimenting with South Dakota’s constitution and laws.

One of those groups, along with several South Dakotans, stood outside the capitol urging lawmakers to accept the will of the voters.

During his annual State of the State address, Governor Dennis Daugaard says he supports repealing Initiated Measure 22. He says he wants constitutionally sound measures to replace portions of it.