Keystone XL Pipeline

SD Legislative Research Council

House State Affairs has voted against allowing tribes to seek reimbursement for expenses associated with pipeline protests.

Last year's legislature established the PEACE fund to collect money for state or political subdivisions whose budgets might be stressed if the Keystone XL pipeline is built and protests rise up.

The committee voted 9 to 4 against including tribes in that group.

Listen to audio for the rest of the story.

SDPB's Victoria Wicks has this report.

Stephen Volker

Opponents to the Keystone XL pipeline have again asked a Montana federal judge to impose a preliminary injunction on the project.

Indigenous Environmental Network and North Coast Rivers Alliance say President Donald Trump acted illegally when he unilaterally gave the project a permit in 2019.

Listen to audio for the rest of the story.

SDPB's Victoria Wicks reports.

Lee Strubinger SDPB

South Dakota's refurbished riot legislation has been passed by House State Affairs. The bill rewrites last year's "riot boosting" law designed to squelch pipeline protests. The committee heard testimony on Wednesday, Feb. 12, and although there was strong opposition by the Speaker of the House, the bill passed on a 10-3 vote.

Most proponents say the law keeps protests peaceful. But opponents say the bill still steps on rights of free speech and assembly.

Montana Federal Court

A Montana federal judge has set a hearing date for renewed arguments on the Keystone XL pipeline.

The Indigenous Environmental Network and North Coast Rivers Alliance have again asked for a preliminary injunction against permitting the pipeline.

TransCanada and the Trump administration have asked for summary judgment.

Judge Brian Morris will hear arguments on those requests and more in Great Falls on March 25.

SDPB's Victoria Wicks has this report.

Victoria Wicks file photo

TransCanada and the Trump administration have renewed their request to dismiss Montana lawsuits against the Keystone XL pipeline.

Parties filed briefs late in the day on Friday, Jan. 24.

Both proponents and opponents of the pipeline restated positions already on record in December, when Montana Federal Judge Brian Morris denied dismissal of the lawsuits and asked for further briefing.

Morris asked parties to clarify several issues, including whether the president has authority to issue a permit.

SDPB's Victoria Wicks has this report.

Victoria Wicks file photo

The South Dakota Water Management Board has approved permits for construction of the Keystone XL pipeline. After a dozen days of hearings held over the past nine months, the board unanimously voted on Tuesday, Jan. 21, to allow TransCanada, or TC Energy, to draw water from three South Dakota rivers.

The board also permitted Wink Cattle Company near Howes and landowners Dean and Lori Wilson near Buffalo to use water for the worker camps TC intends to build on their property.

NARF staff photo

TC Energy has reported to a Montana federal court that it intends to start construction on the Keystone XL pipeline next month.

Trenching won't begin until April. But in February and March, the company plans to move heavy equipment to sites for worker camps, pump stations, pipe yards, and the first crossing at the U.S.-Canada border.

An attorney for the Rosebud Sioux Tribe says TC is jumping the gun.

SDPB's Victoria Wicks has this report.

Victoria Wicks file photo

Supporters and opponents of the Keystone XL pipeline summarized eleven days of testimony before the South Dakota Water Management Board on Tuesday, Dec. 14.

Attorneys for the South Dakota Water Rights Program and for TC Energy hold that state law limits the board's consideration specifically to the use of water during pipeline construction.

But opponents say the board has an obligation to consider potential water contamination and health consequences after the pipeline is finished.

Faith Spotted Eagle file photo

An elder from the Yankton Sioux Tribe testified Monday, Jan. 13, on the potential impacts on women if the Keystone XL pipeline is built. Faith Spotted Eagle says the past, present, and future of indigenous women are threatened by construction and pollution. She made comments to the South Dakota Water Management Board in its hearing to determine whether to allow water use for the pipeline. SDPB's Victoria Wicks reports.

Victoria Wicks file photo

The South Dakota Water Management Board is hoping to wrap up hearings on Keystone XL pipeline permits in the next two days.

The board heard five days of testimony in October and five more days last month.

TC Energy and two landowners want to use water from Western South Dakota sources to build the pipeline and run worker camps.

Opponents include West River tribes and landowners.

SDPB's Victoria Wicks has this report.

To read the Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement and make a comment, click on the link below. The review ends on Jan. 21.

C-Span

A federal judge in Montana has denied requests from President Donald Trump and other federal agencies to dismiss lawsuits against them for permitting the Keystone XL pipeline.

The actions were filed by the Rosebud Sioux Tribe, Fort Belknap Indian Community, Indigenous Environmental Network, and North Coast Rivers Alliance.

Judge Brian Morris issued his ruling just before Christmas. He says, in part, that it's up to Congress, not just presidents, to regulate commerce with foreign nations. And he says it's up to the courts to figure it out.

A federal judge in Montana has refused to dismiss a lawsuit brought by two tribes against President Donald Trump.

The suit claims the president's unilateral permitting of the Keystone XL pipeline in early 2019 violated treaties and the U.S. Constitution.

The Rosebud Sioux Tribe and Fort Belknap Indian Community say federal agencies have a duty to consult government-to-government with tribes.

In South Dakota, during water management hearings, a Rosebud official outlines the inadequacy of tribal involvement to date.

SDPB's Victoria Wicks reports.

Montana Federal Court

A federal judge in Montana has handed tribes and environmentalists a pair of partial victories in their fight to stop the Keystone XL pipeline.

Judge Brian Morris has denied requests for dismissal of suits against President Donald Trump, the U.S. State Department, and other federal agencies.

The actions were filed by the Rosebud Sioux Tribe, Fort Belknap Indian Community, Indigenous Environmental Network, and North Coast Rivers Alliance, et al.

First Peoples Worldwide

Indian reservations are vulnerable to crime and exploitation when transient workers pass through the area. That's the testimony the South Dakota Water Management Board heard on Friday, Dec. 20.

The board is considering whether to allow the Keystone XL project to use local water if the pipeline is built through this state.

SDPB's Victoria Wicks has this report.

Victoria Wicks

If the Keystone XL pipeline is constructed, workers will stay in 10 camps as they move through Montana, South Dakota, and Nebraska.

Pipeline opponents have shared concerns about the potential for workers to commit crimes, especially against women.

At a South Dakota Water Management Board hearing on Thursday, Dec. 19, a project supervisor explained how TC Energy contractors keep control over their employees.

Victoria Wicks file photo

The chief engineer for the South Dakota water rights program says state law governs what she considers when reviewing applications.

Jeanne Goodman signed off on five water permits for construction of the Keystone XL pipeline project. Those permits have been contested by pipeline opponents.

Goodman took the stand on Wednesday, Dec. 18 at hearings in front of the Water Management Board and faced hours of cross examination.

SDPB's Victoria Wicks has this report.

Victoria Wicks file photo

Opponents to the Keystone XL pipeline tried to get climage change reports into the record at a state Water Management Board hearing held this week in Pierre.

TC Energy's attorney objected to repeated efforts to include the Fourth National Climate Assessment and other information on climate change for the board's consideration.

Although the data was not allowed, one witness testified to taking climate reports into consideration when making plans for tribal water use.

SDPB's Victoria Wicks has this report.

Victoria Wicks file photo

This week the South Dakota Water Management Board is hearing four more days of testimony on water permits for construction of the Keystone XL pipeline. The board heard five days of testimony in October, but didn't get through TC Energy's requests.

Still waiting to be heard are applications from two landowners who want to host worker camps.

SDPB's Victoria Wicks has this report on the latest round of hearings that started Tuesday, Dec. 17.

News: Oct 26 - Nov 1

Nov 1, 2019
SDPB

An update on the Keystone XL pipeline.

A warrant of execution of Charles Rhines has been issued for the first week of November.

The CEO of R-CALF USA tells us why America is losing its ranches.

Dan Ahlers has announced his candidacy for the U.S. Senate. 

USD's Tim Schorn tells us what al-Baghdadi's death means.

State Senator Cammack talks the upcoming SD legislative session.

All this & more on your weekly ITM news podcast.

SD Legislative Research Council

South Dakota's Water Management Board is holding hearings on the Keystone XL pipeline during the week when a Keystone oil spill in North Dakota is making national news.

Reports say 383,000 gallons of oil spilled before containment, contaminating wetlands but not drinking water.

State Senator Troy Heinert told the board on Thursday, Oct. 31, that he's concerned about potential damage to South Dakota's agriculture and tourism industries if water is polluted.

Victoria Wicks

The Water Management Board has set certain guidelines to consider water use for the Keystone XL pipeline. The board is hearing one legal consideration at a time for each of three rivers individually.

On this fourth day of hearings, testimony still centers on the first consideration, water quantity and availability.

However, when a witness is not available to come back for each of the considerations, he or she can be heard out of turn and address such topics as public good and beneficial use.

Wednesday morning started with one such witness.

Victoria Wicks

South Dakota Water Management Board hearings continued on Tuesday, Oct. 29, to determine if water should be allocated to build the Keystone XL pipeline. Two initial days of hearings took place at the beginning of the month.

A witness for TC Energy, formerly TransCanada, spent much of the day on the stand, agreeing with conclusions of a DENR engineer who has recommended issuing the permit.

Toward the end of the day, a witness from the Yankton Sioux Tribe stepped up, and the hearing took a contentious turn.

SDPB's Victoria Wicks has this story.

Victoria Wicks file photo

South Dakota Water Management Board is hearing three more days of arguments for and against water use for the Keystone XL pipeline project. Those hearings start Tuesday, Oct. 29, in Pierre.

Permit requests come from TC Energy, formerly TransCanada, and from landowners who will host pipe yards and worker camps.

Two days of hearings have already been held earlier this month. This second round is scheduled to last through Thursday.

SDPB's Victoria Wicks reports.

Victoria Wicks

Climate activist Greta Thunberg attracted a large crowd to Rapid City's Memorial Park on Monday, Oct. 7. Part of the focus was stopping the Keystone XL pipeline.

At that same time, environmental and federal lawyers were preparing for a hearing in Montana that happens on Wednesday, Oct. 9. There a federal judge will consider placing an injunction on construction of the pipeline.

One of the rally organizers talks about the importance of the Montana hearing with SDPB's Victoria Wicks.

Chynna Lockett

Two 16 year olds lead hundreds of people in a march against the Keystone XL Pipeline today. Swedish climate activist Greta Thunberg and Lakota activist Tokata Iron Eyes chanted outside the Rapid City mayor's office about the pipeline’s environmental impact. 

 

Tokata Iron Eyes chants a questions, then Greta Thunberg and hundreds of others follow. 

 

The rally is full of teenagers supporting these young leaders. Iron Eyes says there’s power in mobilizing and voting in democracies. 

 

Chynna Lockett

Sixteen year old Climate activist Greta Thunberg traveled to the Pine Ridge Reservation over the weekend. She joined a young Native American activist who was involved in the 2016 protest against the Dakota Access Pipeline to talk climate change. 

 

Steve Munsen

In The Moment ... October 4, 2019 Show 673 Hour 1

Nick Estes joins In the Moment host Lori Walsh for a conversation about the history of indigenous resistance, water protectors, and decolonization. Estes is in Deadwood for the South Dakota Festival of Books. His latest book is called "Our History is the Future."

Arts and Entertainment reporting on SDPB is supported by the South Dakota Education Association

Victoria Wicks

An engineer with the South Dakota Department of Environment and Natural Resources testified for hours on Thursday, Oct. 3, in Pierre. The Water Management Board is hearing testimony to determine if the state's water can be used for the Keystone XL pipeline.

During the hearing, two children named as intervenors came forth to cross-examine the witness but were not allowed. Their mother, also an intervenor, took up their case and then did the cross herself.

SDPB's Victoria Wicks is in Pierre covering this hearing.

Victoria Wicks

Two people spoke this morning during the public testimony segment on water use for the Keystone XL pipeline.

The state Water Management Board is hearing five days of testimony in October, two of them Thursday and Friday, Oct. 3-4, and the other three at the end of the month.

One of the people testifying says it's time to put an end to the use of fossil fuels before time runs out.

SDPB's Victoria Wicks reports from Pierre.

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