Jerry Fogg

Anne Dilenschneider online

The Hiawatha Indian Insane Asylum at Canton opened in 1902 and operated for more than 30 years. The facility housed indigenous people from across the country who were deemed insane for rebelling against white rule.

Two South Dakotans have been giving presentations for years to call attention to this piece of state and national history.

On Friday evening, they'll speak with a Rapid City audience at the Journey Museum.

Victoria Wicks has this story.

11 Degrees Of Tatanka

Feb 27, 2019
Adria Botella

In The Moment ... February 27, 2019 Show 524 Hour 2

The Lakota origin story says the American bison sacrificed his own body to sustain the First People.

In his new exhibit at the Center for Western Studies on the Augustana University campus artist Jerry Fogg seeks to honor the buffalo's sacrifice by preserving Lakota oral histories.

11 Degrees of Tatanka is on display through May 24 in the Madsen/Nelson/Elman Gallaries of the Fantle Building at Augustana.

www.choctawnation.com

In The Moment ... June 4, 2018 Show 350 Hour 2

The Hiawatha Indian Insane Asylum housed nearly 400 Native inmates from across the U.S. during its 30 years of operation. It was a keystone of federal Indian policy in the early 1900s. However, more than half of the residents died of curable diseases.

Anne Dilenschneider and Jerry Fogg are South Dakota Humanities Council Scholars and Keepers of the Canton Native Asylum story.