Illness

Vaping Related Illnesses In SD

22 hours ago

Two illnesses related to vaping were recently reported in Eastern South Dakota. Both patients are between 20 to 24 years old. Josh Clayton is the State Epidemiologist with the Department of Health. He says the department is investigating to find out what types of products caused the illness. Some similar national cases stem from alterations to the e-cigarettes like adding flavorings, THC or other products. 

 

Kealey Bultena

A treatment developed at Sanford Research is in clinical trial to help kids with a debilitating genetic condition. The FDA fast-tracked the study in part because the condition progresses quickly and children die.

Six patients are part of the Batten Disease trial. One family from the Midwest has a child treated.

Beth and Bryan live in Minnesota. At four years old, their son Blake struggled with fine motor skills. They incorporated occupational therapy. Then Blake needed speech therapy. Then his gross motor skills deteriorated, and he needed physical therapy.

South Dakota Public Broadcasting

West Nile has killed an elderly South Dakotan. State Health Department leaders say the person lived in Yankton County and was in the age range of 80 to 89. That case is one of dozens reported this summer, and officials looking to Labor Day expect even more infections.

South Dakota ended 2015 with 40 cases of West Nile Virus. State epidemiologist Lon Kightlinger says 2016 so far almost doubles last year’s total.

"We’re having a fairly heavy year this year with West Nile," Kightlinger says. "We’ve had 74 cases reported, and the number’s growing every day."

Kealey Bultena / SDPB

Sioux Falls is gaining another emergency department. Avera Health is building a new family medical center west of Interstate 29, and health leaders are including a full-service emergency room. The free-standing ER will provide quick access for people experiencing a health crisis.

By this time next year, physicians, nurses, and a care team will operate an emergency department on the west side of Sioux Falls for 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, 365 days a year.

"Vaccinophobia"

Aug 27, 2013
Sanford

Archana Chatterjee, M.D., Ph.D., chair of the Department of Pediatrics and senior associate dean for faculty development at the University of South Dakota Sanford School of Medicine, has edited a need book on vaccinophobia - the fear of the adverse effects of vaccines and preventative medicine.  Published by Springer, "Vaccinophobia and Vaccine Controversies of the 21st Century" explores the phenomenon in detail and offers a foundation for the development of solutions to dispel the misinformation and myths that surround vaccines.

Influenza Research

Jan 15, 2013

As the influenza virus continues to spread rapidly across the country, Dr. Victor Huber, assistant professor of Basic Biomedical Sciences for the University of South Dakota Sanford School of Medicine, is working to help scientists predict the severity of flu strains to better prepare for future outbreaks.  His research focuses on keeping track of changes in the flu virus so public health workers have an earlier warning that a more lethal strain may be developing.

The South Dakota Department of Health has reported the first influenza death of the season. The person was elderly and from Pennington County. The individual had Influenza B and was hospitalized. Lon Kightlinger is the state epidemiologist and says we have an early flu season this year and it is very important to get vaccinated. Kightlinger adds that there are other things that can be done to stop the spread of the flu virus.

Early Flu Cases

Nov 20, 2012

South Dakota had its first confirmed case of influenza in October, a month earlier than expected by medical experts.  State epidemiologist Lon Kightlinger says the first cases typically crop up closer to Thanksgiving and peak in February and March.  The most recent South Dakota Department of Health report has 68 cases of influenza confirmed across the state.  Kightlinger talks about the early cases, whooping cough and this summer's spike in West Nile on today's Dakota Midday.