Health

Dr. Reiland's focus in breast cancer and breast health allows her to research and recommend the most advanced and appropriate treatment methods for patients. She has a special interest in breast oncoplasty and Electron-based IntraOperative Radiation Therapy (IORT).

The chief cancer control officer of the American Cancer Society is encouraging South Dakotans to get tested for colon cancer. National estimates show one in three adults over age 50 is not screened, even though survival chances skyrocket when doctors catch the disease early. Colon cancer is the third most common cause of cancer death for both men and women in the country.

Be Healthy For The Hunt

Sep 28, 2015

Hunting season may be a good time to check in with your doctor to make sure your body is ready for the increased activity. Here are some tips on being healthy for the hunt.

 

www.orbera.com

Dr. Brad Thaemert joins Dakota Midday to discuss a new weight loss procedure being offered in South Dakota. Avera McKennan Hospital & University Health Center is the exclusive site in South Dakota to offer a revolutionary weight-loss procedure that’s non-surgical and incision-free. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has recently approved the ORBERA™ Intragastric Balloon by Apollo Endoscopy, Inc. This new minimally-invasive weight-loss procedure will be performed by board-certified surgeons, Brad Thaemert, MD, and David Strand, MD.

For several diseases South Dakota has top childhood vaccination rates in the nation. The latest information available comes from the 2014 National Immunization Survey from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

South Dakota’s immunization rates are in the top 10 for more than one dozen individual vaccines recommended across the country. A CDC survey examines rates for children 18 to 35 months old.

Kealey Bultena / SDPB

Sioux Falls is gaining another emergency department. Avera Health is building a new family medical center west of Interstate 29, and health leaders are including a full-service emergency room. The free-standing ER will provide quick access for people experiencing a health crisis.

By this time next year, physicians, nurses, and a care team will operate an emergency department on the west side of Sioux Falls for 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, 365 days a year.

In her song, "Everything’s Beautiful Now," Christine Albert sings  from her mother-in-law’s perspective as she's dying and making peace with her life. Since she first sang at a small gathering for a man facing death from an early death from a terminal illness, Albert has been providing music for people facing the end of their lives. In 2005, she founded Swan Songs, an Austin, Texas area non-profit that fulfills musical last wishes by organizing private concerts for individuals with a terminal illness.

Lori Oster, Program Coordinator for the Better Choices Better Health Program and Megan Olesen, Program Associate for the Better Choices Better Health Program.  Better Choices Better Health is a chronic disease self-management program developed at Stanford University in the 1990’s. 

Local Oncologists Use New Cancer Therapies

Aug 24, 2015

Doctors in South Dakota are using recently-approved drugs to help patients fight cancer. Former President Jimmy Carter’s melanoma diagnosis highlights treatment that includes both radiation and IV immune therapy. Similar treatments may work for cancer patients in South Dakota.

Melanoma is one type of skin cancer. Doctor Marcus Frohm says about 75,000 people will get melanoma this year, and traditional cancer treatments like chemotherapy and radiation may be necessary.

Photography Project Showcases Natural Beauty

Aug 19, 2015
Holly Davidson Photography

A photography display called 'The Truth in Beauty' is on display tonight in downtown Sioux Falls. 

Four women are coming together to make a statement: that everyone is beautiful. Chelsea Tracy is the owner of Chelsea’s Boutique in downtown Sioux Falls. The ‘Truth in Beauty' project featured in her store is a fundraiser for Dress for Success. 

Tracy says she wanted to be part of the project after photographer Holly Davidson realized that women shouldn’t have to wear layers of makeup and accessories to feel beautiful.

Kealey Bultena / SDPB

An area health system is donating $75,000 to support a truck that takes food to hungry people across the state. Avera is putting $25,000 into Feeding South Dakota’s mobile food pantry each year for the next three. The donation supports communities in the central part of the state.

Feeding South Dakota’s mobile food truck has refrigerated sections. That means foods that need to stay cool – think dairy products, produce, and meats – can make it across the state for distribution to hungry families.

In 1960 Dr. Frances Oldham Kelsey was the new medical officer at the Food and Drug Administration when she was assigned the review of a new drug application for thalidomide. The drug was already being sold to pregnant women in Europe and other countries as an anti-nausea drug to treat morning sickness. But Dr. Kelsey refused to approve the application without adequate evidence that the drug was safe. By late 1961 scientists had discovered that thalidomide was causing crippling birth defects in thousands of babies.

Seven Tularemia Cases Found In SD

Jul 28, 2015

Seven people in South Dakota have contracted tularemia. The state health department reports the disease in six adults over the age of 50 and one child who is younger than five. Some needed to be hospitalized.

Health officials discovered all seven tularemia cases in the northern part of the Black Hills. State epidemiologist Lon Kightlinger says the disease is sometimes called rabbit fever.

"Tularemia is often found in rabbits, and people get infected when they kill a rabbit or are exposed to rabbit blood," Kightlinger says.

The Helpline Center in Sioux Falls is leading a mental health first aid training. The 8-hour long session teaches people to look for the signs and symptoms of a mental health crisis and how to help.

Mental health first aid is giving help to someone after noticing signs of illness or distress. Lori Montis is the Suicide and Crisis Support Director at the Helpline Center. She says the training teaches anyone to recognize symptoms and respond.

CDC/Jim Gathany

The state health department is reporting the first West Nile virus detection case of the season. It was detected in a mosquito pool in Meade County last week.

Since its first human West Nile virus case in 2002, South Dakota has reported 2,168 human cases and nearly 700 hospitalizations with 32 deaths. In 2013 there were 149 human cases of West Nile with three deaths. Last year 57 cases were reported.

Karl Gehrke SDPB

Now that we’re well into the summer, people are spending more time out on the state’s lakes and rivers. South Dakota Game, Fish and Parks is encouraging boaters to be safe on the water and wear life jackets. According to the U.S. Coast Guard, 84 percent of people who drowned in boating fatalities were not wearing life jackets.

This Friday through Sunday is also Operation Dry Water’s national heightened awareness and enforcement weekend for boating under the influence.

South Dakota State Medical Association

The South Dakota State Medical Association has a new president. Tim Ridgway, MD of Brandon was elected during the organization's annual meeting May 29. Dr. Ridgway is dean of faculty affairs and associate professor of medicine at the University of South Dakota Sanford School of Medicine. He has an active gastroenterology practice and serves as director of endoscopy at the Veterans Administration Hospital in Sioux Falls.

Kentucky ACA Expert Touts Expanded Medicaid

May 15, 2015

The Affordable Care Act has been a point of contention around the United States since it was first proposed.  The act gives states the option to implement its own insurance markets and to expand the availability of Medicaid.  Although it is a red state, Kentucky chose to do both.  An expert on Kentucky health care paid a visit to Rapid City this week. To hear more, click play below.  

Sanford Health

Customized cancer treatment is the future of cancer therapy, but analyzing the unique genetic make-up of individuals can take an enormous amount of time. It typically takes weeks for clinicians to analyze each genetic mutation, but IBM Watson Genomic Analytics in some cases can complete the process in just a few minutes and produce a report, including treatment recommendations. The ambitious goal is personalized medicine for cancer patients everywhere based on their unique genomic profile.

Courtesy of Frontline

Salmonella found on chicken has become one of the top food safety issues in the U.S. Around one in four pieces of raw chicken is estimated to be contaminated with salmonella today.

Americans are living longer than ever before, creating challenges for family caregivers. A new AARP survey of South Dakotans age 45 and over show that more than half have provided care on an unpaid basis for an adult loved one who is ill, frail elderly or who has a disability. Of those who have never provided care, 45 percent say they are at least somewhat likely to do so.

A recent surge in sexually transmitted diseases in South Dakota is prompting free screenings in Sioux Falls. Planned Parenthood is providing tests for four STDs at no charge this week. The advocacy group and a doctor with the state agree that STDs are a growing public health concern.

The state epidemiologist says South Dakota had record numbers of STDs in 2014. By the end of the year, 4,170 cases of chlamydia were found in South Dakota. That’s the most ever reported in the state in one year.

Dr. Shelby Terstriep, medical oncologist (based in Fargo) and medical director for embrace Survivorship Program and Meagan Huisman, affiliate coordinator for Susan G. Komen South Dakota.  They discuss a Susan G. Komen grant to start a survivorship program for women with breast cancer.  The program is designed to create an innovative program to meet the physical, emotional, spiritual, and psychological needs of every cancer survivor.  

Dakota Midday: SDSU Hosts West River Nurse Camp

Apr 20, 2015
South Dakota State University

By the time many students are in middle and high school, they’re starting to consider more seriously what they would like to do for a career. South Dakota State University’s annual Jackrabbit Nurse Camp gives them the opportunity to find out what it would be like to be a nurse. The camp takes place in June in Rapid City and Sturgis. Sandra Mordhorst, instructor at SDSU West River Department of Nursing, joined Dakota Midday and discussed the summer nurse camp. For more information click here.

Feeding America

The latest information from Feeding America shows more than 1 in 10 South Dakotans lacks consistent access to enough healthy food. A recent study shows that, in the past year, more than 12 percent of people in South Dakota didn’t have access to enough food. 

Every county in South Dakota suffers from food insecurity. The numbers prove hunger affects children, and it’s more likely in certain parts of the state.

South Dakota Battles Superbugs

Apr 13, 2015
SD Department of Health

State Health officials say South Dakota is part of a national plan to combat antibiotic resistant bacteria.

Bacteria evolve quickly and many strains have now become immune to antibiotics that used to stop them.  Global health officials are expressing increasing concern over the rise of so called “super bugs.”    

Angela Jackley is with the South Dakota Department of Health.  

Dakota Midday: Tourette Syndrome

Apr 8, 2015
Sanford Health

Tourette Syndrome is a neurological disorder that causes uncontrollable tics, such as repeated eye blinks, heard and shoulder jerks or unwanted sounds. Signs and symptoms of Tourette Syndrome typically show up between ages two and twelve. As many as one in five children may have a tic disorder. But recognizing Tourette’s can be difficult.

Tamoxifin has been credited with saving millions of women’s lives. But the story of how an abandoned contraceptive was turned into an effective treatment cancer is a fascinating tale of a failure transformed into a medical breakthrough.

Sanford Health

Next week, SDPB-TV airs the latest Ken Burns documentary, Cancer the Emperor of All Maladies. The three-part, six-hour series covers the first documented appearances of cancer thousands of years ago through today’s battles to cure, control and conquer the disease.

Dakota Midday: Author Advocates Metabolic Theory of Cancer

Mar 25, 2015

The metabolic theory of cancer has been rejected by the scientific establishment, but in his book, Tripping Over the Truth, South Dakota author Travis Christofferson argues for taking a closer look at alternative cancer research. The metabolic theory is that cancer is not a genetic disease, but rather a disease of metabolism. Christofferson’s book looks at the history of cancer research over the last century.

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