Gordon Howie

A political action committee is committing more money to the US Senate race in South Dakota. A PAC known as Mayday is adding $250,000 to its earlier pledge of $1 million.

The money is going to media time to support Democrat Rick Weiland. He faces Independent Larry Pressler, Republican Mike Rounds, and Independent Gordon Howie in the race for United States Senate. One political scientist says he expects more national attention as poll numbers show a close competition.

Pressler for Senate

South Dakota's contest for U.S. Senate is receiving national attention as a race that was considered safely Republican but is now seen as closer than expected. Some recent polls have Republican Mike Rounds in first at around 35 percent with either Democrat Rick Weiland or independent Larry Pressler in second place just a few points behind the former governor.

Kealey Bultena / SDPB

Candidates for United States Senate are weighing in on the federal government’s role in Indian Affairs. The four men running for South Dakota’s open seat met Monday at a Sioux Falls Rotary Club lunch for a panel discussion. Candidates agree that something needs to change for sovereign Indian nations.

Gordon Howie is running for US Senate as an Independent. He says poverty and dysfunction exist on Native American reservations because politicians claim they champion Indian communities and don’t follow through on their support.

A nationwide Super PAC plans to spend $1 million in the race for South Dakota’s open United States Senate Seat. A group named Mayday calls itself a citizen-funded Super PAC. Leaders say their money comes from everyday people through crowdfunding and they claim to support policy, not political parties. Mayday is putting its money into commercials, get-out-the-vote campaigns and mailers.

In the four-way race to fill the U.S. Senate seat currently held by retiring Democrat Tim Johnson, Gordon Howie describes himself as the “true conservative.” The former Republican state legislator from Rapid City says he's running as an Independent candidate to provide state voters with an alternative to the Republican nominee, former Governor Mike Rounds.

The other candidates in the race for the open Senate seat are Democrat Rick Weiland and former Republican Senator Larry Pressler, who is also running as an Independent.

Kealey Bultena / SDPB

Candidates in two high-profile South Dakota elections are meeting this summer to debate issues important to voters. Friday the South Dakota Farmers Union hosted the most recent discussions among candidates for governor and US Senate. Both debates generated ideas about energy in South Dakota.

A member of the debate audience at the State Fair in Huron wants to know whether U-S Senate candidates support building the Keystone XL pipeline. The proposed route runs through western South Dakota, and the pipe would carry crude oil from Canada to Texas refineries.

Kealey Bultena SDPB

The general election campaign season kicked off this week with debates at the Dakotafest ag show in Mitchell. On Wednesday Republican Governor Dennis Daugaard faced his challengers Democrat Susan Wismer and independent Mike Myers. The four candidates for the U.S. Senate seat currently held by retiring Democrat Tim Johnson squared off later in the afternoon: Republican Mike Rounds, Democrat Rick Weiland and independents Larry Pressler and Gordon Howie. Issues at both debates included the EB-5 visa program and the Affordable Care Act.

Kealey Bultena / SDPB

Political hopefuls in two major races are questioning fellow candidates about their involvement with the EB-5 program. Dakota Fest in Mitchell is host to both a gubernatorial debate and a US Senate candidate forum. The Wednesday debates took questions submitted by people in the audience. Both debates included discussions about uncertainties surrounding a foreign investment program. 

A candidate for South Dakota’s open US Senate seat says he wants everyone in the race to help prevent outside money from influencing the campaign. Democratic candidate Rick Weiland says the public move would benefit voters, but not everyone in the race agrees with Weiland’s perspective.