Earth Day

SDPB News: April 22

20 hours ago
SDPB

The SDPB News Podcast is where we bring you South Dakota's top news and politics headlines from the past 24 hours.

Each day, SDPB's journalism team works to bring you pertinent news coverage. We then compile those stories into one neatly formatted daily podcast so that you can stay informed. Subscribe on Apple Podcasts or Spotify today.

Five Essential Questions With David O'Hara

23 hours ago
NPR

In The Moment ... April 21, 2020 Show 801 Hour 1

We've been asking a few of our trusted friends five essential questions about life during the pandemic. This Earth Day we've invited David O'Hara to return to In the Moment. He is director of sustainability at Augustana University and Professor of Philosophy, Classics, and Environmental Studies. 

Earth Day & Future Tech

23 hours ago
NPR

In The Moment ... April 21, 2020 Show 801 Hour 1

Lori Walsh

In The Moment ... April 17, 2018 Show 317 Hour 1

What is the connection between social justice and environmental sustainability? Can humor help us deal with climate change?

The University of South Dakota hosted character actor Peterson Toscano Tuesday in Old Main's Farber Hall for a joint keynote address for the Diversity Symposium and Earth Days celebration.

Lori Walsh

In The Moment ... April 27, 2017 Show 081 Hour 1

We begin the hour with a look at Astronomy Day at the University of South Dakota. Joel Sander, associate physics professor at USD, joins Dr. Vuk Mandic in the studio to talk about the LIGO collaboration's discovery of gravitational waves and a significant discovery proving some of Einstein’s theory of relativity concepts and other theories about black holes.

SDPB’s Nate Wek joins us for a conversation about The Shift, this time with a visit to the town of Avon for a look at how open enrollment has impacted the district.

Victoria Wicks

Saturday's March for Science in Rapid City was part of an international Earth Day movement.

Scientists typically don't get involved in politics, but according to national news feeds, they're feeling threatened by proposed federal budget cuts to the EPA, NASA, and other science-based programs.

Some Rapid City signs referred to politics: "Science Trumps Opinion," "Science Is Not an Alternative Fact," "Save the EPA."

Victoria Wicks

To see the stars, you must find the dark. And because it's rare to find darkness these days, human-made light is considered to be pollution. This weekend in Rapid City, as part of this year's Earth Day celebration, people gathered at Main Street Square to learn more about it. They saw captive owls and talked with astronomers, the creatures who work by night.

cmczoo.com

In The Moment ... April 18, 2017 Show 074 Hour 2

Meghann Jarchow is coordinator for the Sustainability Program at the University of South Dakota. Earth Day events across the nation bring awareness and action to today’s environmental challenges as well as highlighting solutions. Jarchow joins us to preview community Earth Day efforts in Vermillion.

Victoria Wicks

Earth Day activities this weekend in Rapid City will include a March for Science. A junior at the South Dakota School of Mines and Technology is organizing a march on Saturday from the campus to the Central States Fairgrounds. Cole Sawyer says this is a nonpartisan and diverse group coming together to emphasize the importance of evidence-based research.

Marchers will gather at the Surbeck Center parking lot Saturday morning at 9 a.m. The march ends north of the 4-H building at the Central States Fairgrounds.

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Photo by JT Thomas

Colorado writer Craig Childs travels to some of the world’s most desolate and challenging places and reflects on the millions of years of change on Earth. In his latest book, Apocalyptic Planet: Field Guide to the Everending Earth, Childs goes from the driest deserts of Chile to the drowned land bridge of the Bering Sea to understand what could be next.

Victoria Wicks

On Earth Day, members of environmental groups came together to call for cleanup of thousands of abandoned uranium mines in South Dakota and other locations, most of them in Western states. Charmaine White Face of Defenders of the Black Hills headed up this effort and chose the Cheyenne River as a meeting place. She says it’s one of several contaminated areas in the state. SDPB’s Victoria Wicks traveled to find the environmentalists about 20 miles east of Hermosa on Highway 40.