Dakota Access Pipeline

Cassi Alexandra for NPR

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers has been ordered to complete a meaningful environmental impact study on the Dakota Access Pipeline.

A federal judge in the D.C. district issued that order on Wednesday, March 25, and will consider whether to shut the pipeline down until the study is done.

A lawyer for the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe says it's about time.

Listen to audio for the rest of the story.

SDPB's Victoria Wicks has this report.

Chynna Lockett

Sixteen year old Climate activist Greta Thunberg traveled to the Pine Ridge Reservation over the weekend. She joined a young Native American activist who was involved in the 2016 protest against the Dakota Access Pipeline to talk climate change. 

 

Steve Munsen

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Arts and Entertainment reporting on SDPB is supported by the South Dakota Education Association

Morrisa Maltz

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Prior to the 92nd session of the South Dakota legislature, we welcomed South Dakota Supreme Court Chief Justice David Gilbertson for a preview. Now, as the session comes to a close, we welcome him back to the program for a recap. We talk about HB1183 and mental health legislation set to change the way citizens with mental health issues interact with the criminal justice system.

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www.kfyrtv.com

A bill that increases the governor’s scope to react to a large scale protest now heads to the Senate Floor.
 
The governor’s office says Senate Bill 176 is legislation that aims to keep protests peaceful when the Keystone XL pipeline gets built. Opponents say it’s a restriction on free speech.

Senate Bill 176 lets the governor declare a public safety zone, establishes the crime of criminal trespassing, limits the number of people on public and school lands, as well as allows out of state lawyers to help with an increase in number of defendants.

Kealey Bultena

In The Moment ... February 22, 2017 Show 035 Hour 1

Photo by Victoria Wicks

Governor Dennis Daugaard’s office is expanding state statute to handle any potential pipeline demonstrations in the future.
 
The bill comes a few weeks after President Donald Trump greenlighted the Dakota Access and Keystone XL pipelines.
 
There’s concern over methods the governor’s office took to change state law.
 
Governor Daugaard’s office took a relatively empty bill called a shell bill, and stuffed it full of ten changes and additions to state statue.
 
The method is called a hog house amendment.
 

http://www.npr.org/people/4462099/lourdes-garcia-navarro

In The Moment ... February 16, 2017 Show 032 Hour 1

Lulu Garcia-Navarro is the new host of NPR’s Weekend Edition Sunday. She talks with Lori Walsh about taking the helm of a legacy program on NPR, how an intimate conversation creates a driveway moment, and how the role of American journalists hasn’t changed as much as some people think.  

Contention Follows Executive Order Approving Pipelines

Jan 26, 2017
Chynna Lockett

President Donald Trump’s executive order approving two pipelines has sparked both positive and negative reactions across the country. The decision comes while hundreds of campers remain in North Dakota protesting the Dakota Access Pipeline.

Melisa Hamersma / SDPB

Native American Activists say they’re heading back to the Oceti Sakowin camp near Cannonball, North Dakota, following President Donald Trump’s memorandum regarding two controversial pipelines.
 
Tribal Leaders in the Standing Rock Reservation say the fight is now political, and should be fought in the nation’s capital.

In The Moment ... January 25 2017 Show 016 Hour 1

Guests: Leslie Morrow, State Executive Director Alzheimer's Association South Dakota Chapter; SDPB's Chynna Lockett, pipeline approval reaction; SDPB's Victoria Wicks, celebration of the birthday of Scots Poet Robert Burns; Jon Else, producer & cinematographer;

SDPB

Yesterday, the Army Corps of Engineers announced it would not grant the permits needed for the Dakota Access Pipeline to proceed as planned. The announcement spurred celebrations, questions, anger, joy and doubt. Lakota elders Charmaine Whiteface and Madonna Thunder Hawk discuss the role of prayer with respect to DAPL protests.

Lee Strubinger / SDPB

People across the country took part in protests against the Dakota Access Pipeline on Tuesday.   The event billed as a National Day Of Action included events in Rapid City, Sioux Falls as well as major cities across the country.

Demonstrators are calling for a halt to construction of the pipeline.  The Army Corps of Engineers says it needs more time to study the project before it permits the compay to cross under the Missouri River.
Pipeline proponents are hopeful that president elect Donald Trump will push to see the project completed.

Lee Strubinger

Bruce Ellison is Rapid City Attorney who has worked in Indian Country for decades.  Today is taking part in the legal defense for those resisting the Dakota Access Pipeline crossing of the Missouri River near the Standing Rock Reservation. Ellison joins Dakota Midday to talk about the changing nature of the protests and why he wants the pipeline stopped.  

Lee Strubinger / SDPB

The Dakota Access Pipeline is a $3.8 billion, 1,200 mile long pipeline that will carry Bakken Crude Oil from North Dakota to Illinois. Construction of the pipeline is nearly complete.

Those against the pipeline are making a stand at several camps now established near the construction site in North Dakota. Local law enforcement have made several arrests of activists who are attempting to stop the pipeline. 

Craig Stevens is a spokesman for the Midwest Alliance for Infrastructure Now, or the MAIN Coalition. He joins Dakota Midday for a conversation on the latest developments on the Dakota Access Pipeline.

Crow Creek Rescinds Contact With The State

Oct 25, 2016
Crow Creek Sioux Tribe

The Crow Creek Sioux Tribe is rescinding any and all contact with the State of South Dakota. Tribal officials say they’re not happy the state is offering aid to North Dakota law enforcement at a pipeline blockade near the Missouri River.

In a letter sent to the governor’s office on Monday, the chairman of Crow Creek says the state chose to stand against its people in favor of big oil.

However, the governor’s office says North Dakota requested help, and that resource sharing is a common practice.

 

www.kfyrtv.com

Craig Stevens, spokesman for the Midwest Alliance for Infrastructure Now, or the MAIN Coalition, updates Dakota Midday on the construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline.

Dakota Political Junkies Kevin Woster and Roger Whittle dig in to the 2016 ballot questions with an overview of  Constitutional Amendment R (relating to the authority of the Board of Regents.) Kevin Woster provides insight and comparisons regarding protests over oil pipelines in contrast to turnout for life and death issues in Pine Ridge. We conclude with a remembrance of SD Rep. Dan Dryden of Rapid City.

Roger Whittle is managing editor of the Watertown Public Opinion. Kevin Woster is with KELO TV's Rapid City Bureau. 

Amy Sisk is a broadcast journalist, working for Inside Energy Now and Prairie Public Radio. She joins Dakota Midday with an update on the Dakota Access Pipeline protests.

Energy Transfer Partners, L.P.

Officials with the US Army Corps of Engineers are considering permits to construct and operate the Dakota Access Pipeline Project. The crude oil pipeline will connect the Bakken and Three Forks oil production areas in North Dakota to existing infrastructure in Illinois, traveling through part of South Dakota. Most of the more than eleven hundred mile pipeline crosses private lands. The US Army Corps of Engineers has jurisdiction on about 37 miles, or about three percent of the project…the sections that cross water or federal land. Eileen Williamson is a spokesperson for the Corps.