Community

SDPB

In The Moment ... July 23, 2019 Show 621 Hour 1

This spring, the Billie Sutton Leadership Institute announced its inaugural group of fellows. The 13-member class represents a wide rance of backgrounds, from agriculture to health care, business, corrections and more.

The Institute is a public service and community engaged leadership training program developed by former state senator and gubernatorial candidate Billie Sutton.

Selby Community Forms Non-Profit to Save Nursing Home

Oct 11, 2018
Walworth County Care Center Facebook Page

The nursing home in Selby has served the small community for more than 50 years. When its operators announced plans to pull out of the facility, concerned community members sprang into action to keep the home running. 

The Good Samaritan Society announced plans to end its operation of the facility in Selby in late September, but it gave the community some options. The home could close, the community could temporarily fund the society for one year, or the community could form its own organization to run the home.

Jackie Hendry

The rates for both suicide deaths and drug overdoses are highest in rural America, and those statistics continue to rise in South Dakota. On Thursday in Sioux Falls, Avera Health and the Department of Justice held a conference to help community members respond to the ongoing crisis. 

This is the fifth year that Avera and the DOJ have partnered for a conference on a particular topic. U.S. Attorney Ron Parsons says this year’s theme suggested itself.

Terri Colgrove

   The international students who attend South Dakota’s colleges and universities have plenty of challenges.  From language barriers to the weather--there’s a lot to navigate. But perhaps the biggest and most important challenge is finding a sense of home away from home.

 As part of an ongoing series on international students in the state, SDPB’s Jackie Hendry shares how some students adjust and what one family gained from welcoming students into their home

SDPB

In The Moment ... September 26, 2017 Show 185 Hour 2

Hugh Weber, host of The Potluck Society blog and podcast, unveils plans for the South Dakota Public Broadcasting hosts The Potluck Society gathering on December 1 at Washington Pavilion in Sioux Falls.

Kealey Bultena

A group from the Sioux Falls area is back in South Dakota after distributing wheelchairs to people in need in Guatemala. The Dispatch Project team members worked at a wheelchair seating clinic. They adjusted chairs to fit the needs of children and adults with disabilities.

SDPB's Kealey Bultena participated in the trip to Central America. Listen to her description of the experience as she talks with In The Moment host Lori Walsh here, and read select stories below.

Kealey Bultena / SDPB

Leaders use the phrase "workforce shortage" often as South Dakota sees low unemployment and a mismatch of skills with job openings. Local hospitals and clinics are not immune. One area health organizations is paying to train students for positions they can’t fill. In turn, students learn on-the-job during internships and commit to staying in town for a few years.

City of Sioux Falls

Builders are launching $15 million worth of projects in Sioux Falls to increase the city’s affordable housing options. Most of the funding comes through the state’s housing development authority. The City of Sioux Falls is lending the projects hundreds of thousands of dollars. The two projects appeal to people in different circumstances.

Kealey Bultena / SDPB

A panel of community members can soon weigh in on work happening in Rapid City Schools. People can apply to be part of a community advisory council. The group will meet once a month to discuss issues related to education in a broad context.

Rapid City Area Schools superintendent Lori Simon says she’s been talking about a community advisory board since she interviewed for the district’s top job. Simon says people who live and work in the community have ideas and perspectives to contribute.

Dakota Midday: Bush Foundation Announcements

Nov 15, 2016
www.bushfoundation.org

Duchesne Drew, Community Network Vice President for the Bush Foundation, joins Dakota Midday to announce the South Dakota recipients of the 2016 Bush Foundation Award for Community Innovation. In his position, Drew oversees and integrates the work of communication, community innovation and leadership program teams.

SF Parents Surveyed On School Start Date

Nov 15, 2016
Kealey Bultena / SDPB

Thousands of parents in Sioux Falls are getting a survey about the school start date. This is the second year public schools in Sioux Falls started after Labor Day. As decision-makers look to the fall of 2018, they want to know the range of start dates stakeholders prefer.

Sioux Falls School District leaders are assessing what the school calendar should look like two years from now. Brian Maher is superintendent.

www.medicinewheelmodelcircularthinking.com

Lynette Two Bulls is a 2016 First People's Fund Community Spirit Award winner alongside Phillip Whiteman Junior. Two Bulls is a traditional storyteller, performing artist and culture bearer. She joined Dakota Midday along with First People's Fund President Lori Pourier.

Charles Michael Ray

Erik Bringswhite is a former Rapid City gang member who now works to stop meth use in South Dakota.  Bringswhite uses Lakota culture and spirituality to reach out to those who are struggling with addiction.

Bringswhite is a meth prevention coordinator with the Oglala Sioux Tribe.   He stopped by the Rapid City studio for an interview with a group of individuals working to curb the use of the addictive drug in the state.

Kenzie Wagner / SDPB

Members of a group working to tackle some tough community issues in Rapid City say they are making progress. The Rapid City Collective Impact Coalition is a new organization working to address social issues in the community.

 

Members of the Rapid City Collective Impact Coalition chose eight focus areas following a series of workshops last week. Project chair Dr. Albert Linderman says the work streams, or subsystems, will target issues like mental health, substance abuse, economic development, and education.

Group Targets Social Issues In Rapid City

May 18, 2016
Kenzie Wagner / SDPB

A new organization in Rapid City is addressing community issues. 

The Rapid City Collective Impact Coalition is laying out plans to tackle concerns in the community.    They could include topics like homelessness, education, mental health, or substance abuse.    

Dr. Albert Linderman is the chair of Rapid City Collective Impact. He says the first step of the project is to understand issues the community deems important.

Crazy Horse School is receiving a federal grant worth $107,631 to help students cope with suicide on the Pine Ridge Reservation. This is the third grant from the US Department of Education to Pine Ridge schools after tribal leaders declared a state of emergency following a string of suicides.

Project SERV grants target schools where kids experience significant violent or traumatic events. The latest funding adds two counselors at Crazy Horse School in Wanblee to help restore the learning environment.

Secretary John King leads the US Department of Education.

Kealey Bultena / SDPB

People in Delmont are marking the anniversary of a tornado that tore through the tiny town. The storm struck mid-morning on May 10, 2015. No one died, but several people were hurt, and the storm brought widespread damage to the southeast South Dakota community. Some residents are still rebuilding while others have left for good. 

One year ago, crews used machines to shove massive piles of broken boards, downed trees, and debris off the streets of Delmont. A tornado toppled cars, shattered windows, and decimated city landmarks.

Kealey Bultena / SDPB

Some inmates at the state prison are working to uphold a standard of integrity despite living decades behind bars. The South Dakota State Penitentiary houses people who have committed heinous crimes. It’s also a place where inmates of many faiths can choose to worship.

A Lutheran congregation called St. Dysmas has more than 100 churchgoers in the 700-person prison. They elect council members, and those inmate leaders talk about forming community when their own actions keep them from being part of regular society.

Building Bridges Across The Racial Divide In Rapid City

Dec 21, 2015
Chynna Lockett

Rapid City has a history of tense race relations.   

Last year racial tension erupted after an incident in which Lakota students say they were doused with beer at a hockey game.   Those accused were found not guilty of any crimes.

But following the incident, a number of efforts began to build bridges and forge new cross cultural relationships in Rapid City.  One of those efforts is called Community Conversations.

Kealey Bultena / SDPB

The family of Kermit Staggers says they appreciate support as he heals through health challenges. The Sioux Falls city council member collapsed in September due to a heart condition. Colleagues say they support Staggers, and a family member says she appreciates encouragement from the community.

Kermit Staggers is a former South Dakota state lawmaker and current city council member in Sioux Falls. His daughter Ayn Bird says her dad is not wavering in his commitment to public service to encourage limited government and advocate for unlimited opportunity for people.

A library in Sioux Falls is partnering with Feeding South Dakota to provide after-school snacks for elementary students.

At 3 o'clock on a school day, students at Anne Sullivan Middle School walk across the street to Oak View Library while they wait to get picked up. Director of Siouxland Libraries  Mary Johns says staff had the idea of asking Feeding South Dakota if the two groups could partner to provide a snack for students who stay late in the evening waiting for parents.

The Sioux Falls Human Relations Commission presented three humanitarian awards Monday night in Sioux Falls. The awards recognize volunteers helping to make the Sioux Falls community a better place to live and work.

The group known as SALSA which stands for Serve and Learn Student Association received the organizational award. Jennifer Abels is the coordinator of the group that connects students with volunteering programs.

Networking Through Pollen

Oct 5, 2015

In a way, networking and building community in the digital age is easier than a generation ago.  A new connection in your field of work is sometimes just a Facebook click away.  But there is more to building community, business relationships and innovation than just social media.  This is where the group Pollen comes in.  The non-profit is based in Minnesota and the Dakotas.  Pollen is attempting to build cross community networks and relationships that spur new ideas and possibilities in the three-state region.  Pol

Kealey Bultena / SDPB

A coalition of Sioux Falls area leaders is setting priorities for workforce. Business, education, government, and community stakeholders are applying national and local economic data to develop a plan for sustainability. 

Forward Sioux Falls and a company called Market Street services collected data for six months. The information spans across platforms: innovation, economic performance, workforce capacity, quality of life, business environment, labor market, public education, technical programs and higher ed.

SF High Schoolers Construct Affordable Housing

Sep 14, 2015
Erin Mairose

This week a house built by high school students is moving to a permanent home. The home is traveling down 12th street in Sioux Falls – and for a cause.

Wayne Wagner is the housing development director for Affordable Housing Solutions in Sioux Falls. The group helps low income families find cost-efficient housing while helping revitalize deteriorating neighborhoods. Wagner says a partnership with the Sioux Falls School District supports the community.

Erin Mairose

A class of high school carpentry students at the Career and Technical Education Academy is learning skills for future careers. 

Sitting in Bill Pulford’s classroom at the CTE Academy is a house.

From framing, to insulation and cabinetry, this class built the three bedroom home. Pulford says soon moving trucks are relocating the house to a permit location in Sioux Falls.  

Kealey Bultena / SDPB

Leadership in the Sioux Falls police department changes next month. The current assistant chief is taking over as chief, and the mayor has appointed a new second-in-command. Both men share a similar vision that emphasizes community.

The faces of top law enforcement in Sioux Falls are familiar, but their titles are changing – even to Mayor Mike Huether.

"But it is probably why it was such an emotional day when Galen – I’m sorry. I’ll call you Galen just for only the one time," Huether says. "But you’ve earned Captain, and you certainly have earned Assistant Chief, Galen."

More than $134,000 is on its way to non-profit organizations across South Dakota. The grant funding targets innovation in communities, and 15 different groups are receiving funding this round. This is the second of three waves of grant funding in 2015.

Earlier this year, the South Dakota Community Foundation and the Bush Foundation based in St. Paul Minnesota awarded about $130,000 to area non-profits. Now just as much is headed toward local groups through the second round of grants.

Lacrosse, Attracting Kids Looking For A New Sport

Aug 18, 2015
Erin Mairose

Lacrosse is one of the fastest growing sports in the U.S. and now the trend is starting in Sioux Falls. The group Sioux Falls Lacrosse has over 150 kids playing the sport since starting a year ago. 

Wearing helmets and cradling sticks, players dart across a field trying to score the ball into a goalie. Opposite to the field a group of seven-year- olds attend their first clinic to learn the basics of Lacrosse.

George Gongopoulos brought his son Elliot to the clinic. He says the Lacrosse sounded like fun sport for his son to try out as a beginner. 

Kealey Bultena / SDPB

An area health system is donating $75,000 to support a truck that takes food to hungry people across the state. Avera is putting $25,000 into Feeding South Dakota’s mobile food pantry each year for the next three. The donation supports communities in the central part of the state.

Feeding South Dakota’s mobile food truck has refrigerated sections. That means foods that need to stay cool – think dairy products, produce, and meats – can make it across the state for distribution to hungry families.

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