Chemotherapy

Dr. Amy Sanford, an oncologist with Sanford discusses the findings of a new study that shows greater survival for newly diagnosed advanced lung cancer patients who receive an immunotherapy drug plus standard chemotherapy. These results are expected to change the way patients are treated.

Kealey Bultena / SDPB

October brings a sea of pink to billboards, t-shirts, stores and even the NFL. Talking about every aspect of breast cancer during a designated awareness month is impossible. Patients and health providers say each person's journey is unique. A common thread does exist among these individual stories: a tenacious fight against allowing cancer any control.

The women featured here refuse to relinquish their dignity, their decisions, and their lives to a devastating disease - and each manifests this perseverance in a different way.

Sanford

Sanford oncologist and cancer researcher Dr. Steven Powell was among a team of researchers who discovered that the drug olanzaphine significantly improved nausea prevention in patients who were receiving chemotherapy for cancer treatment. The findings were recently published in the New England Journal of Medicine.

    

Kealey Bultena / SDPB

Avera’s work to personalize cancer treatment could help people around the world. Leaders for the health system made the announcement Tuesday that the genomic oncology team is joining with the Worldwide Innovative Networking Consortium to participate in research and clinical trials. Now internationally renowned cancer expert Doctor Brian Leyland-Jones and Avera’s Center for Precision Oncology Director Casey Williams talk about the potential that exists in the new partnership.

Kealey Bultena / SDPB

Cancer researchers in Sioux Falls are now part of an international group collaborating on personalized treatment. Avera Cancer Institute is one of five American institutions partnering in a consortium referred to as WIN. Doctors say the revelations can help people with cancer at all stages.

Standard cancer treatments are often based on therapies that work for most people. Doctor Brian Leyland-Jones says everyone is different – and so are their cancers. He says tumors have different genes, compositions and signaling pathways.