Chemistry

Dr. Ranjit Koodali is the Dean of the Graduate School and Professor of Chemistry at the University of South Dakota. He joins us each month to discuss the latest research in chemistry. We dicsuss nanomedicine and the versatility of materials contributing to this fast and emerging area of research to find novel solutions and cures for diseases. 

Chris Laughery

Dr. Ranjit Koodali is the Dean of the Graduate School and Professor of Chemistry at the University of South Dakota. He joins us each month to discuss the latest research in chemistry. This month we explore the technology of 4-D printing. Georgia Tech researchers are finding new applications for their work. 4-D printing is the process of creating self-assembling structures that transform over time.

Chris Laughery

Hydrocarbons gone amok. Dr. Ranjit Koodali from the University of South Dakota talks about how ski wax can make or break winning the gold.

Chris Laughery

Ranjit Koodali joins to discuss the Nobel Prize in Chemistry

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Emily Griese, Ph.D., director at Sanford Research joins the program to discuss findings from a study of real-time patient data. The data was made available as part of a collaboration with academic institutions to study it for trends and insights.

Ryan Bartz is the Marketing and Communications Specialist for the USD Center for Disabilities and Richard Parent-Johnson is a Senior Research Associate. They discuss the annual Symposium event held Sunday, September 10th through Tuesday, September 12th at the Sioux Falls Convention Center.

SDPB/Cara Hetland

In The Moment ... August 25, 2017 Show 164 Hour 2

Former U.S. Transportation Secretary James Burnley is in Sioux Falls to address the latest efforts to modernize air traffic control in the country and how those efforts might impact states like South Dakota.  Burnley served as General Counsel, Deputy Secretary and Secretary of Transportation under President Ronald Reagan.

Thayne Munce of the Sanford Sports Science Institite discusses the latest research in concussion testing and the recently released national CTE study.

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SDSU hosts the biennial ChemEd Conference July 23-27. It brings together chemistry educators from across North America. Organizer Matt Miller says high School and introductory chemistry educators are immersed in an environment where collaboration, support, exchanging ideas and inspiration are expected. Matt Miller is an associate professor of chemistry at South Dakota State University.

Chris Laughery

Peter Vitiello, Ph.D., an associate scientist in the Children’s Health Research Center at Sanford Research has developed a new model which could have lasting implications for some of the world’s most dangerous diseases like cancer, diabetes, and heart disease. Dr. Vitiello is a member of the Society for Redox Biology and Medicine. It's an international organization of 1,200 scientists, investigators and clinicians who conduct research in the area of redox biology as well as oxidants and antioxidants.

The New Colossus

In The Moment ... February 21, 2017 Show 034 Hour 1

In The Moment...Show 011 January 17 2017 Hour 2

Guests: Dr. Michael Dianovsky, assistant professor of chemistry at South Dakota State University, Max Kringen, founder of Tell Well; SDPB's Lee Strubinger; Nolan Lawrence, The Hillbenders

Dakota State University professors Michael Gaylor and Patrick Videau talk about the chemistry and biology research that comes from a jar of preserves - a jar of pumpkin preserves that was sealed in 1920! Students Hope Juntunen and Vaille Swenson also join Innovation as they share what they hope to find - and what NOT to find.

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University of South Dakota

Dr. Ranjit Koodali is a monthly contributor to SDPB Radio's Innovation. Koodali is a chemistry professor at the University of South Dakota and Dean of the USD Graduate School. "Dr. K" is also the public relations chair of the Sioux Valley Section of the American Chemical Society. He joins today's program to talk about efficient and selective degradation of polyethylenes into liquid fuels and waxes under mild conditions - or, in simple terms, turning plastic bottles into fuel.

USD

Dr. Ranjit Koodali, USD Chemistry Professor and now Dean of the USD Graduate School joins us to discuss the latest in research around the country. Dr. K is the Public Relations Chair of the Sioux Valley Section of the American Chemical Society. He provides regular collection of science articles and is going to join Innovation once a month to talk about what’s happening around the country. Today Dr. K. teaches us about using biosynthesized ZnO nanoparticles and soil fungi.

submitted photo

Dr. Ranjit Koodali, USD Chemistry Professor and now Dean of the USD Graduate School joins us to discuss the latest in research around the country. Dr. K is the Public Relations Chair of the Sioux Valley Section of the American Chemical Society. He provides regular collection of science articles and is going to join Innovation once a month to talk about what’s happening around the country.

We talk about the Light sparks conversion of dinitrogen (commonly called nitrogen) to ammonia.

Dr. Ranjit Koodali, USD Chemistry Professor discusses the latest in chemistry research around the country. Dr. K is the Public Relations Chair of the Sioux Valley Section of the American Chemical Society. He provides regular collection of science articles and joins Innovation once a month to talk about what’s happening around the country. The focues is on Graphene - a type of carbon.

USD

Dr. Ranjit Koodali, USD Chemistry Professor joins us to discuss the latest in research around the country. Dr. K is the Public Relations Chair of the Sioux Valley Section of the American Chemical Society. He provides regular collection of science articles and is going to join Innovation once a month to talk about what’s happening around the country. 

Dr. Ranjit Koodali is a Chemistry Professor at the University of South Dakota. He joins us to discuss the latest in research around the country. Dr. K is the Public Relations Chair of the Sioux Valley Section of the American Chemical Society. He provides regular collection of science articles and is going to join Innovation once a month to talk about what’s happening around the country. Today he discusses renewable energy research and the recent announcement that Nanoscale system reaching perfect efficiency for solar fuel production step. 

Cyanide Detection

Jan 23, 2015

Cyanide poisoning can kill within 30-minutes.  Having a quick, easy means of detecting exposure can save lives.  Brain Logue, associate professor of Chemistry and Biochemistry at South Dakota State University, and his team have developed a sensor that will detect cyanide poisoning in less than a minute through a National Institutes of Health/Department of Defense grant.  The current clinical standard is a 24-hour lab-based test.  The new technology would be used by emergency rooms and first responders.  A post-doctoral student on the project, Randy Jackson explained that multiple prototypes