Ballot Questions

Lee Strubinger / SDPB

Lawmakers are entering the third week of legislative session. By the end of this week, lawmakers say they’ll have a better sense of what kind of session is ahead.

Thursday marks the last day for unlimited bill introductions. They’ve already considered several bill aimed at the initiative and referendum process.

Lawmakers have voted on a handful of bills already aimed at clarifying and streamlining the ballot measure process, from petitions to voting.

Deadline For Ballot Questions Is Today

Nov 6, 2017

Today is the deadline for submitting ballot question petitions. Those petitioners must submit their collected signatures by 5 p.m. central time.

Currently, 12 petitions are out for circulation. Sponsors are hoping to place their question on the November 2018 ballot.

Secretary of State Shantel Krebs says her office will check a random sample of signatures

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In The Moment ... May 22, 2017 Show 098 Hour 1

South Dakota's ballot question system empowers voters, but also features a controversial influx of out-of-state money. A summer task force is set to evaluate the process. Augustana University political science professor Emily Wanless chairs the South Dakota Legislature's initiative, referendum and constitutional amendment task force. She joins In the Moment to talk about a nonpartisan conversation about direct democracy.

SDPB

The group backing two marijuana related ballot questions says they’re concerned about the language of the Attorney General’s explanations.
 
The Attorney General is tasked with crafting ‘an objective, clear, and simple summary’ of a proposed amendment.
 
A lawyer assisting the group New Approach South Dakota in passing two ballot questions legalizing recreational and medicinal marijuana says the language in Attorney General Marty Jackley’s summary is unnecessarily strong.
 

Dakota Midday: Dakota Political Junkies

Sep 26, 2016
National Park Service

Dakota Political Junkies Jon Hunter and Seth Tupper discussed Initiated Measure 22. The measure extensively revises state campaign finance laws while requiring additional disclosures and increasing reporting. It lowers contribution amounts to political action committees and creates a publicly funded campaign finance program for statewide and legislative candidates who choose to participate and agree to limits on campaign contributions and expenditures.

Some Nebraska lawmakers are campaigning for a South Dakota ballot initiative. Nebraska elects state legislators without separating them into political parties. They say many of the legislative races in South Dakota are decided even before the general election - and that erodes the integrity of the political system. Nebraska has used non-partisan elections for more than 80 years. SDPB's Kealey Bultena has this conversation with Nebraska State Senators Galen Hadley, Colby Coash and Adam Morfeld.

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Steve Hildebrand, owner of Josiah's Coffee Shop in downtown Sioux Falls, has paired up with Steve Hickey to gather signatures for Initiated Measure 21 which caps payday lending rates in South Dakota at 36%. Hildebrand is a Democrat who worked on President Obama's campaign. Hickey is a Republican.

From Amendment U to Initiated Measure 21, Hildebrand discussed his thoughts on controlling the payday lending industry and deception in the ballot questions during his visit on Dakota Midday.

Retired businessman Joe Kirby joins Dakota Midday as part of SDPB's continued 2016 Election coverage.

Kirby discusses his support of Amendment V, an effort to establish nonpartisan elections.

Photo courtesy of Jason Glodt

In November, South Dakota voters will decide whether to add a crime victims' bill of rights to the state constitution. It sounds like a sympathetic cause. It gives victims the right to be treated with fairness and respect and to participate fully in criminal justice processes.

The state director of the campaign, Marsy's Law for All, says an amendment to the constitution is necessary to ensure that victims' rights are permanent.

The 2016 Ballot Questions are more than ballot clutter; they are compelling social and political conversations that give voters a voice on a variety of issues.

SDPB's political reporter Lee Strubinger joins Dakota Midday to explain what your ballot will look like in November, highlighting various referred laws and Constitutional Amendments.

Each Wednesday, Dakota Midday welcomes a rotating panel of the most experienced political journalists in the state. This week Denise Ross (editor, Black Hills Knowledge Network, South Dakota Dashboard) and Jonathan Ellis (Argus Leader Media journalist/columnist) join host Lori Walsh to discuss Initiated Measure 21 and Constitutional Amendment U. Both are 2016 ballot questions.

We also discuss failures in transparency for campaign spending and the challenges of early voting.

Victoria Wicks

In November, South Dakota voters will decide whether to add a crime victims' bill of rights to the state constitution. Advocates' and opponents' positions are starting to emerge.

The proponent, Marsy's Law for All, is launching what its director calls a six-figure radio campaign.

Opponents don't yet have an organized campaign, but they include the South Dakota State Bar and State's Attorneys Association.

SDPB's Victoria Wicks is researching Amendment S and the contentions of those aligned for and against it.

Kealey Bultena / SDPB

Two out of ten ballot measures up for vote in South Dakota deal with interest rates. Initiated Measure 21 caps interest rates at 36 percent.

Opponents of the measure say that cap would choke the industry.

 

A coalition of South Dakota churches and concerned citizens are backing a proposal to cap interest rates at 36 percent. Supporters say it would rope in payday loan companies that charge upwards of 500 percent on short term loans.