Addiction

Jackie Hendry

The rates for both suicide deaths and drug overdoses are highest in rural America, and those statistics continue to rise in South Dakota. On Thursday in Sioux Falls, Avera Health and the Department of Justice held a conference to help community members respond to the ongoing crisis. 

This is the fifth year that Avera and the DOJ have partnered for a conference on a particular topic. U.S. Attorney Ron Parsons says this year’s theme suggested itself.

Michael Zimny

In The Moment ... June 27, 2018 Show 367 Hour 1

Substance abuse is common among male and female inmates in South Dakota prisons. Department of Social Services statistics show that in 2017, 87 percent of adult offenders were substance-dependent at the time of intake. However, more women are incarcerated for drug offenses than men -- 65 percent of female inmates versus 27 percent of males -- while more males are in prison for violent offenses than females: 47 percent to 14 percent respectively.

South Dakota’s rural communities often lack resources to combat drug and alcohol addiction. Thanks to a new grant, Avera Health is looking to expand its telehealth services in some under-served areas. 

The Health Resources and Services Administration is awarding Avera a $750,000  grant to expand its addiction recovery services. The project starts with the Avera clinics in Flandreau and Aberdeen.

Malia Holbeck is the outpatient manager for Avera’s addiction recovery program. She says telemedicine can help bridge the gap for areas that lack certain services.

Avera Health

Avera Health plans to build an Addiction Care Center on its new campus at 69th and Louise in Sioux Falls. Avera psychiatrist Dr. Matthew Stanley says an estimated 10%-15% of the general population struggles with some kind of chemical dependency. 

Kealey Bultena / SDPB

South Dakota authorities have taken 500-thousand dollars’ worth of a dangerous drug off the street. Tuesday Chamberlain Police and the state’s Division of Criminal Investigation executed a search warrant. They found 20,000 fentanyl pills.

Fentanyl has real medical uses. The National Institute on Drug Abuse reports that doctors prescribe the synthetic opioid to ease pain after surgery or alleviate chronic pain. People addicted to drugs may use fentanyl that’s manufactured for medicine.

1881 Courthouse Museum

In The Moment ... April 10, 2017 Show 068 Hour 2

Dr. Kelvin Lim is vice-chair for research in the department of psychiatry at the University of Minnesota. He talked with Prairie Public’s Doug Hamilton about research into addiction. For thoughts on the mental health care crisis in South Dakota, tune in to South Dakota Focus with Stephanie Rissler on SDPB-TV this Thursday at 8 p.m. Central, 7 Mountain.

Kealey Bultena / SDPB

A Sioux Falls doctor says insurance status often dictates resources available for meth users who want to break free from the drug. Health leaders say meth is a dangerous substance with devastating physical, mental, and social ramifications.

A typical poster condemning meth use displays a disheveled person with a miserable gaze, ashen skin and open sores. Doctor Jennifer Tinguely with Falls Community Health in Sioux Falls says meth affects every system of the body. She says the drug triggers a rush of hormones including dopamine, adrenaline, and serotonin.

Gustavus Adolphus College student Alexa Giebink has written "Phoenix: Rising from Addiction," which is set for a December release.  The book tells the story of the Giebink family dealing with Mary Ann Giebink's addiction to alcohol and drugs and her rise and fall as a successful attorney to prison.  The book was written as a healing process for Alexa who was in high school in Sioux Falls when Mary Ann was in prison.  For more information see Alexa Giebink's website at www.alexagiebink.com.

As President of the National Association of Attorneys General, Marty Jackley led a delegation of Attorneys General on a mission to Taiwan last week where they discussed criminal justice.  Jackley met with Taiwan President Ma-Ying-Jeou to discuss criminal justice, law enforcement and the economic partnership between the U.S. and Taiwan.  The delegation also met with the Hon.

The South Dakota House defeated a bill to increase the amount of video lottery machines in a licensed establishment. Republican State Representative Dick Werner says this bill allows permitted buildings to increase the amount of video lottery machines from the current 10, to 15. Werner says video lottery does a lot for the South Dakota economy and this opens doors for more revenue.

The maximum bet limit for video lottery remains unchanged after the South Dakota House of Representatives defeated House Bill 1246. The bill attempted to raise the video lottery bet limit from the current two dollars to five dollars.

Republican State Representative Dick Werner is a sponsor of House Bill 1246. He says video lottery has not been changed in the state since its creation, so an improvement is necessary.

March Into The Light

Sep 3, 2013

September is National Recovery Month.  On Saturday, Face It Together sponsors the third March Into the Light community walk to celebrate recovery from alcohol and drug addiction.  The walk begins at 6:45 a.m. at Washington Pavilion in Sioux Falls.  Face It Together is a group of social entrepreneurs dedicated to transforming the way our nation treats and understands addiction.  Face It Together CEO Kevin Kirby and Craig Kindrat, Manager of the Avera Behavioral Health Services Addiction Recovery Program, talked about addiction recovery and Saturday's walk on Tuesday's Dakota Midday.

"The Anonymous People"

Apr 15, 2013

"The Anonymous People" is a provocative new feature documentary film about the nation's growing public recovery movement.  It'll be shown in a special sneak preview in Sioux Falls on Saturday, April 20, at 6:30 p.m. at the Washington Pavilion.  The film's producer, Greg Williams, will be at the preview for a panel discussion and post-screening question and answer session.  Williams discussed the film, which features interviews with more than 30 people from all walks of life, on Monday's Dakota Midday.