2016 Election

Kealey Bultena / SDPB

Political parties court different demographics, and one crucial group of voters includes young people. Many have the chance to vote in their first presidential election this year. College students studying media at the University of Sioux Falls are watching the presidential race, and they’re learning to balance their journalism training with their Constitutional rights. 

Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump are two of the most polarizing presidential candidates in modern history.

Tonight, FRONTLINE’s acclaimed election-year series, “The Choice,” returns — going behind the headlines to investigate what has shaped these two candidates, where they came from, how they lead and why they want one of the most difficult jobs imaginable. FRONTLINE airs at 8:00 p.m. Central on SDPB-TV.

Some Nebraska lawmakers are campaigning for a South Dakota ballot initiative. Nebraska elects state legislators without separating them into political parties. They say many of the legislative races in South Dakota are decided even before the general election - and that erodes the integrity of the political system. Nebraska has used non-partisan elections for more than 80 years. SDPB's Kealey Bultena has this conversation with Nebraska State Senators Galen Hadley, Colby Coash and Adam Morfeld.

Dakota Political Junkies Kevin Woster and Roger Whittle dig in to the 2016 ballot questions with an overview of  Constitutional Amendment R (relating to the authority of the Board of Regents.) Kevin Woster provides insight and comparisons regarding protests over oil pipelines in contrast to turnout for life and death issues in Pine Ridge. We conclude with a remembrance of SD Rep. Dan Dryden of Rapid City.

Roger Whittle is managing editor of the Watertown Public Opinion. Kevin Woster is with KELO TV's Rapid City Bureau. 

Ryan Budmayr, executive director of the South Dakota Republican Party, is at the 2016 Republican National Convention in Cleveland, and he joins Midday to share some insider details. He describes the event as both high-energy and genuine. He also mentions controversy over the GOP's platform, South Dakota's reaction to a Trump nomination, and memorable speakers at the convention.

Kent Osborne / SDPB

In November, South Dakota voters will get the chance to decide whether or not to support a measure that would create a non-partisan primary system.

Supporters say it increases democracy, while opponents say it reduces transparency.

Amendment V is neither a Republican nor a Democrat backed issue. State Republicans decided to oppose the constitutional amendment at their state convention, and state Democrats neither support nor oppose the measure.

Jay Williams Announces Bid for US Senate

Feb 19, 2016

A Yankton-based business owner is now running for the U.S. Senate.
 
Jay Williams announced his candidacy Friday at a press conference in Sioux Falls.   Williams was born in Gettysburg, South Dakota.  He says he’s a 4th generation South Dakotan.  Williams is a Democrat, but he says both of his grandparents were Republicans.
 

Voters Consider Competing Payday Loan Regulations

Jan 6, 2016

South Dakota is one of few states that has no cap on the interest rate payday loan companies can charge.   Some loan companies require an APR of 500 percent or higher.

In November voters will consider two competing regulations on payday loan companies.  But only one proposal includes an actual cap on interest rates if the loan is in writing.   

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