Sunday Puzzle: Spanish To English

Oct 25, 2020

On-air challenge: I'm going to give you some common five-letter words in Spanish. For each one, rearrange the letters to spell a common, uncapitalized word in English.
Example: CESTA (basket) --> CASTE
1. TODOS (all or every)
2. TRUCO (trick)
3. BANCO (bank)
4. ARROZ (rice)
5. CINCO (five)
6. JABON (soap)
7. TORRE (tower)
8. PECHO (chest)
9. HUESO (bone)
10. ODIAR (to hate)

Last week's challenge: Name a world capital. Change one letter in it to D-Y. The result will be two words, one after the other. The first word names somebody you like to be around. The second word names somebody you don't like to be around. What city is it?

Challenge answer: Budapest --> Buddy, pest

Winner: Matthew Trill of Clearwater, Fla.

This week's challenge: It comes from Neville Fogarty, of Newport News, Va. What common seven-letter verb is made up of three consecutive musical notes in order?

Submit Your Answer

If you know the answer to next week's challenge, submit it here. Listeners who submit correct answers win a chance to play the on-air puzzle. Important: Include a phone number where we can reach you by Thursday, Oct. 29, at 3 p.m. ET.

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

LULU GARCIA-NAVARRO, HOST:

And it's time to play The Puzzle.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

GARCIA-NAVARRO: Joining us is Will Shortz. He's puzzle editor of The New York Times and WEEKEND EDITION's puzzle master. Hi, Will.

WILL SHORTZ, BYLINE: Hey there, Lulu.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: So what was last week's challenge?

SHORTZ: Yeah, it came from listener Michael Schwartz of Florence, Ore. I said name a world capital. Change one letter it to D-Y. The result will be two words, one after the other. The first word names somebody you like to be around. And the second word names somebody you don't like to be around. What city is it? Well, the city is Budapest, the capital of Hungary. Make that change. You get buddy and pest.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: We received more than 2,000 correct responses, and the winner is Matthew Trill of Clearwater, Fla. Congratulations.

MATTHEW TRILL: Thank you very much. Glad to be here.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: How did you figure it out?

TRILL: Well, I got a little sidetracked because Santa popped into my head, and I thought maybe there was a capital that started Santa something. And then thinking of the DY, looking at a list of capitals, buddy made sense and pest was just standing there waiting to look at.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: Good job. And I hear that playing the puzzle has been a longtime tradition in your family.

TRILL: It has been decades - started out when my oldest two were very little. On the way to church, we'd listen to it. It timed just perfectly with our very short trip to church, and we all put our minds to it. And as they grew into adults, it's been a longstanding tradition for us even to this day.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: And I hear you have a question for Will.

TRILL: I would like to ask Will, knowing his passion for table tennis, if he has ever ventured out into pickleball.

SHORTZ: You know, I haven't, and I know pickleball has become huge. I have only so much time in my life for obsessions, and literally December 20 will be my 3,000th consecutive day of playing table tennis.

TRILL: Wow.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: Wow.

SHORTZ: So as much fun as pickleball sounds, just can't do it.

TRILL: Very good.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: All right. Well, are you ready to play the puzzle?

TRILL: Absolutely.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: All right. Take it away, Will.

SHORTZ: All right, Matt, I'm going to give you some common five-letter words in Spanish. For each one, rearrange the letters to spell a common, uncapitalized word in English. Lulu, you jump in because your Spanish is going to be a lot better than mine.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: Yay.

SHORTZ: So for example, if we said...

GARCIA-NAVARRO: Cesta.

SHORTZ: ...Which means basket - C-E-S-T-A - you'd rearrange those letters to spell caste, C-A-S-T-E. Here's No. 1.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: Todos.

SHORTZ: T-O-D-O-S. It means all or every, and rearrange the letters T-O-D-O-S to spell a word. Starts with S.

TRILL: Stood.

SHORTZ: Stood is it. Number two.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: Truco.

SHORTZ: That means trick - T-R-U-C-O.

TRILL: Court.

SHORTZ: That's it.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: Banco.

SHORTZ: That means a bank - B-A-N-C-O. Something you might eat at breakfast.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: Or bring home if you're making money.

TRILL: Bacon.

SHORTZ: There you go, bacon.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: Arroz.

SHORTZ: Means rice - A-R-R-O-Z.

TRILL: Razor.

SHORTZ: Oh, that was fast.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: I feel like one of these Spanish-language, you know...

(LAUGHTER)

GARCIA-NAVARRO: ...Information kits, you know? It's like, here's your word. Practice it after me. Cinco.

SHORTZ: Means five - C-I-N-C-O. Starts with C.

TRILL: Well, I see coin, but I don't know what to do with the other C.

SHORTZ: And the second letter is indeed O.

TRILL: Conic.

SHORTZ: Conic is it.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: Jabon.

SHORTZ: Nice. It means soap - J-A-B-O-N. It's a musical instrument.

TRILL: Banjo.

SHORTZ: That's it.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: Torre.

SHORTZ: Means tower - T-O-R-R-E. And it starts with R. And it's a kind of style, say, something that looks like 1950s, '60s?

TRILL: Oh, OK. Retro.

SHORTZ: Retro is it.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: Pecho.

SHORTZ: Means chest. That's P-E-C-H-O. This is a tough one. It starts with an E.

TRILL: Epoch.

SHORTZ: That's it.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: Hueso.

SHORTZ: Means bone - H-U-E-S-O. What do you live in?

TRILL: (Laughter) House.

SHORTZ: There you go. And your last one.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: Odiar.

SHORTZ: O-D-I-A-R - it means to hate.

TRILL: Radio.

SHORTZ: Radio. How's that for appropriate?

GARCIA-NAVARRO: Good job. I hope everyone has learned some Spanish now.

(LAUGHTER)

GARCIA-NAVARRO: How do you feel?

TRILL: I thought I would do better, but once you start to see something a certain way, it's hard to unsee it.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: You did excellent.

TRILL: Thank you very much.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: And for playing our puzzle today, you'll get a WEEKEND EDITION lapel pin, as well as puzzle books and games, and you can read all about it at npr.org/puzzle. And, Matt, which member station do you listen to?

TRILL: WUSF, 89.7 FM.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: Matthew Trill of Clearwater, Fla., thank you so much for playing the puzzle.

TRILL: Thank you very much for having me. I enjoyed it.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: Our multilingual puzzle. All right, Will, what's next week's challenge?

SHORTZ: Yeah, it comes from Neville Fogarty of Newport News, Va. What common seven-letter verb is made up of three consecutive musical notes in order? That's it. What common seven-letter verb is made up of three consecutive musical notes in order?

GARCIA-NAVARRO: When you have the answer, go to our website npr.org/puzzle and click on the submit your answer link - remember, just one entry per person, please. Our deadline for entries is Thursday, October 29, at 3 p.m. Eastern. Include a phone number where we can reach you at about that time. And if you're the winner, we'll give you a call. And if you pick up the phone, you'll get to play on the air with the puzzle editor of The New York Times and WEEKEND EDITION's puzzle master, Will Shortz. Thanks so much, Will.

SHORTZ: Thanks, Lulu.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC) Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.