USD Law School

Chris Laughery

In The Moment ... September 7, 2017 Show 172 Hour 1

Should the Law School at the University of South Dakota relocate to Sioux Falls? A committee continues to seek input about the option, and SDPB's Jackie Hendry was in the room for the second meeting, yesterday in Sioux Falls.

UCLA Scholar Speaks at USD on LGBT Issues

Oct 7, 2016
Levi Gutz

A scholar from the University of California Los Angeles says the LGBT community has a long way to go to achieve legal equality.  That’s despite the fact the Supreme Court legalized same-sex marriage this summer.

The University of South Dakota Law School held its annual Lavender Lecture this week. The event was hosted by OUT-Laws, a student group that brings discussion about LGBT issues,and Women in the Law.

USD Law's Grace Day Dies At 89

Jul 15, 2016
SDPB News

Grace Day died on Wednesday, July 13 at the age of 89. She was considered a pioneer for women in law.  Day was the only woman in the 1949 University of South Dakota School of Law graduating class.  She went on to lead a successful legal career.

"I enjoyed being around people, trying to help people. I didn't really know at the time what it'd be like practicing law, but I wasn't afraid to move into a new avenue and see what it was going to be."

  How does a Communist country integrate capitalistic ideals into an ancient Confucian culture? USD law professor Thomas Horton joins Midday to discuss China and the implementation of its anti-monopoly laws. Horton highlights the influence of Western innovation, the historic relationships that impact China's trade philosophies, and how the intersection of socialism and capitalism has surfaced in the 2016 U.S. Presidential election.

South Dakota has joined a multi-state legal battle against the federal government in support of the Keystone XL Pipeline. USD law professor Myanna Dellinger joins Dakota Midday to talk about the legal action and Keystone’s impact on the international conversation about climate change. 

Vern Halter has garnered three top five finishes in the famed Iditarod and eight top ten finishes. The South Dakota native moved to Alaska shortly after graduating from USD. He sits down with Lori Walsh to talk sled dogs, the Alaska wild, and how to mentally prepare for a 1,000 mile race where not even your cell phone can bail you out of trouble.

University of South Dakota

Flint Michigan is a city of about 100,000 residents, 41 percent of whom live below the poverty line. On January 16, President Obama declared a state of emergency in Flint because of severe drinking water contamination. Because of changes in the city’s tap water supply, the people of Flint had been drinking and bathing in water highly contaminated with lead … a powerful neurotoxin that causes lifelong health consequences, many of which are severe. The problem with water in Flint has been going on for at least two years, and is still not fully resolved.

Justice Antonin Scalia served three decades on the United States Supreme Court. He died this weekend at the age of 79. Called a “leader of a conservative intellectual renaissance" by the New York Times Scalia was known for his intellect and his wit as much as for his legal legacy.

USD law professor Jonathan Van patten discusses the impact of Justice Scalia ... why he was admired, why he was criticized, and why he was such good friends with intellectual opponent Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg.