U.S.

The Two-Way
1:23 am
Fri October 24, 2014

Frank Mankiewicz, Aide Who Announced Robert Kennedy's Death, Dies

Frank Mankiewicz, Sen. Robert F. Kennedy's press secretary, updates the press about Kennedy's condition after being shot in June 1968. Mankiewicz died Thursday at the age of 90.
AP

Frank Mankiewicz, who worked for Sen. Robert F. Kennedy and George McGovner, died Thursday night at a hospital in Washington, D.C., according to family spokesman Adam Clymer. He was 90.

As press secretary to Kennedy, Makiewicz announced his death in June 1968.

He ran Sen. George McGovern's presidential campaign in 1972.

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The Two-Way
11:05 pm
Thu October 23, 2014

Recently Returned From Africa, Doctor Tests Positive For Ebola At NYC Hospital

Police officers stand outside the home of Craig Spencer, a Doctors Without Borders physician who recently returned to the city after treating Ebola patients in West Africa, on Thursday in New York. Spencer tested positive for the virus, according to preliminary test results, city officials said.
John Minchillo AP

Originally published on Thu October 23, 2014 11:43 pm

A patient at a New York City hospital has tested positive for Ebola, New York Mayor Bill de Blasio said at a press conference on Thursday.

According to a statement from Doctors Without Borders, a doctor returned to the United States Oct. 12 after working with Ebola patients in Guinea.

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All Tech Considered
5:35 pm
Thu October 23, 2014

Calling 911 On Your Cell? It's Harder To Find You Than You Think

The Fairfax County 911 Center in Virginia takes calls during Hurricane Sandy in 2012. It was relatively easy to locate callers when most people used landlines. But most 911 calls now come from cellphones, which can pinpoint a callers' location only within 100 to 300 meters.
Greg E. Mathieson Sr. Mai/Landov

Originally published on Thu October 23, 2014 5:57 pm

Today's mobile phones can do almost everything a computer can. But we still need them for their most basic purpose: making phone calls — especially in emergencies.

Yet existing technology can't always pinpoint a caller's location, particularly when a 911 caller is indoors.

The Federal Communications Commission has proposed new regulations for wireless carriers to help address the problem, but so far, wireless providers are resisting the changes.

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Around the Nation
5:35 pm
Thu October 23, 2014

Park Service Construction Damaged Native American Burial Sites

Jim Nepstad, superintendent of Effigy Mounds National Monument in northeast Iowa, stands at the top of a bluff looking over the Mississippi River.
Clay Masters NPR

Originally published on Thu October 23, 2014 7:43 pm

Imagine being able to drive an all-terrain vehicle right up next to a sacred earthen Native American burial mound.

At Effigy Mounds National Monument, you can. Three million dollars' worth of illegal construction projects went on for a decade at one of the nation's most sacred Native American burial grounds in northeast Iowa. And it happened under the watch of the National Park Service.

The park didn't do the proper archaeological studies before installing an intricate boardwalk system that now encircles ancient burial mounds that are shaped like bears and birds.

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It's All Politics
5:27 pm
Thu October 23, 2014

Meet The Hero Dogs Of The Secret Service

Jordan, one of the dogs being hailed as a hero for attacking a White House fence-jumper Wednesday night.
Courtesy of the Secret Service

Hurricane "enjoys playing with his Kong toy." Jordan is partial to walks around the White House. Both have brown eyes and, according to tweets from the Secret Service, are "ready to work." Meet the hero dogs, who helped take down the latest man to jump the fence at the White House.

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Law
4:29 pm
Thu October 23, 2014

ACLU Challenges Miami Law On Behalf Of Homeless Sex Offenders

This encampment under the Julia Tuttle Causeway in Miami, shown in 2008, was cleared out by authorities in 2009. It was home to sex offenders who were unable to find places where they were permitted to live under Miami-Dade County's strict residency law. Although this makeshift community was broken up, homeless sex offenders continue to camp out in other areas of the county.
David Adame AP

Originally published on Thu October 23, 2014 7:15 pm

Miami-Dade County's sex offender residency restrictions — some of the tightest in the country — drew national attention a few years ago when an encampment of sex offenders sprang up on a causeway in Biscayne Bay. After a public outcry, local and state authorities evicted several dozen people, mostly men, from that makeshift settlement.

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Politics
4:28 pm
Thu October 23, 2014

Democrats Remain Optimistic About Senate, Gubernatorial Races

Originally published on Thu October 23, 2014 5:35 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Goats and Soda
3:57 pm
Thu October 23, 2014

What's My Risk Of Catching Ebola?

Data sources: David Ropeik/Harvard University, National Weather Service, World Health Organization, Northeastern University Laboratory for the Modeling of Biological and Socio-Technical Systems, National Geographic, United States Census
Adam Cole and Ryan Kellman NPR

Originally published on Fri October 24, 2014 12:03 am

Health officials are saying it. Scientists are saying it. Heck, even many journalists are saying it: "The risk of Ebola infection remains vanishingly small in this country," The New York Times wrote Wednesday.

But what does that mean? Are you more likely to be struck by lightning or catch Ebola?

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World
3:31 pm
Thu October 23, 2014

U.S., Canada Use Different Approaches To Defend Against Terrorism

Originally published on Thu October 23, 2014 5:35 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

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Around the Nation
3:31 pm
Thu October 23, 2014

In Missouri, A Tale Of Two Fergusons

Originally published on Thu October 23, 2014 5:35 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Business
3:31 pm
Thu October 23, 2014

Cigarette-Maker Reynolds American To Ban Smoking At Work

The headquarters of Reynolds American in downtown Winston-Salem, N.C.. Starting in January, workers there will no longer be allowed to smoke at their desks.
Chris Keane Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Thu October 23, 2014 5:35 pm

Reynolds American, the country's second-largest cigarette-maker, is changing its policy on smoking in the office. Until now, Reynolds employees have been able to light up at their desks, but come January, workers will have to either go outside or use specially equipped smoking rooms.

"We allowed smoking of cigarettes, cigars, pipes, traditional tobacco products throughout our facilities," says David Howard, a spokesman for Reynolds American. He says it's not as though his co-workers chain-smoke at work.

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Education
3:31 pm
Thu October 23, 2014

UNC Chancellor: Report Reveals 'Shocking Lack' Of Checks And Balances

Originally published on Thu October 23, 2014 5:35 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Now a conversation with UNC's Chancellor Carol Folt. I began asking by her about the accusation you just heard - that this report is a whitewash.

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Education
3:31 pm
Thu October 23, 2014

New Details Revealed In University Of North Carolina Academic Scandal

Originally published on Thu October 23, 2014 5:35 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Shots - Health News
3:31 pm
Thu October 23, 2014

FDA Cracks Down On Fake Ebola Cures Sold Online

The problem isn't just that fake cures are worthless, doctors say. Fraudulent claims also give some people the false sense that the product can protect them from getting sick.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Thu October 23, 2014 5:44 pm

Snake venom, vitamin C, Nano Silver and herbs have all been pitched online as a treatment or cure for Ebola. None has the backing of the FDA.

"Unfortunately during public health threats such as Ebola, fraudulent products that claim to prevent, treat, cure disease often appear on the market almost overnight," says Gary Coody, the FDA's national health fraud coordinator. In particular, the FDA wants consumers to beware Ebola "cures" peddled online.

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Law
3:31 pm
Thu October 23, 2014

Retrial Of Texas Arson Case Ends With Surprise Guilty Plea

Originally published on Thu October 23, 2014 5:35 pm

Robert Siegel talks with Dave Mann of the Texas Observer about the conclusion of the retrial of Ed Graf on arson charges. Graf had been convicted of arson decades ago for setting a fire that killed his two young stepsons. Still, he has always maintained his innocence. A court found that the evidence used in his trial was so questionable that he deserved a retrial. On Wednesday, in a surprise move, Graf pleaded guilty while the jury was still in deliberations, apparently deadlocked on the question of his guilt or innocence.

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The Two-Way
2:55 pm
Thu October 23, 2014

Report Says UNC Grade-Boosting Scandal Involved Fake Classes

University of North Carolina system President Tom Ross and UNC Chapel Hill Chancellor Carol L. Folt talk during a special joint meeting of the UNC Board of Governors and the UNC Chapel Hill Board of Trustees on Wednesday.
Gerry Broome AP

Originally published on Thu October 23, 2014 3:51 pm

Fake classes, inflated grades and one academic department that facilitated it all. Those are all detailed in a newly released report on grade-fixing at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill.

The scandal came to light in 2011, but the report out Wednesday offers the most wide-sweeping look yet at how some school staff members boosted the grades of more than 3,000 students — nearly half of them athletes — over nearly 20 years.

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U.S.
2:08 pm
Thu October 23, 2014

PBS Series Explores Oil Boom Impact on North Dakota Reservation

Oil and pump rig on the Fort Berthold Reservation in North Dakota
Credit America by the Numbers

The Fort Berthold Indian Reservation in western North Dakota is in the heart of the Bakken oil field. There are more than 1,000 wells on the reservation and the oil boom has brought jobs and affluence for many. But it's also brought increased drug trafficking, crime, traffic fatalities and a huge influx of non-Indian oil workers.

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Shots - Health News
1:30 pm
Thu October 23, 2014

How To Sell Bogus Health Cures In 5 Easy Steps

Wouldn't it be great if this stuff really did cause quick painless weight loss?
iStockphoto

I'm bummed that the green coffee weight-loss cure touted by Dr. Oz doesn't work. It could have been the perfect painless antidote to my habit of lying on the sofa eating Russian chocolate.

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The Salt
10:49 am
Thu October 23, 2014

Why California's Drought-Stressed Fruit May Be Better For You

These pomegranates are about an inch smaller than the typical size, but they're packed with antioxidants.
Courtesy of Tiziana Centofanti

Originally published on Thu October 23, 2014 6:01 pm

California's severe drought is putting stress on everyone these days: the residents whose wells are running dry; the farmers forced to experiment with growing their produce with much less water; and of course, the thirsty fruits and vegetables themselves.

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The Protojournalist
10:13 am
Thu October 23, 2014

Girl Scouts Look For A Way Out Of The Woods

Girl Scouts model contemporary uniforms.
From Girl Scouts of the USA website

Originally published on Thu October 23, 2014 1:06 pm

The Girl Scouts organization wants s'more — members and leaders, that is.

Membership in Girl Scouts of the USA is on the decline. In the past year, according to the group's official blog, there has been a significant drop nationwide — down 400,000 girls and adults — from 3.2 million to 2.8 million.

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Economy
9:52 am
Thu October 23, 2014

You're Enjoying Low Gas Prices, But Is It Really A Good Sign?

Macy Gould shared this photo from Lexington, Ky., where the gas prices are under $3.
Macy Gould Instagram

Originally published on Thu October 23, 2014 1:40 pm

All around the country, gasoline prices have been falling for weeks, down to an average of about $3 a gallon. Those lower prices are helping restrain inflation across the board.

On Wednesday, the Labor Department said its consumer price index barely inched up 0.1 percent last month. Over the past 12 months, the CPI has risen by 1.7 percent, roughly half of its historical average rate of increase.

That sounds great for consumers.

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Shots - Health News
7:58 am
Thu October 23, 2014

Scientists Fight For Superbug Research As U.S. Pauses Funding

A rogues gallery of the viruses (left to right) that cause MERS, SARS, and influenza.
Niaid; 3D4Medical; Niaid/Science Source

Originally published on Thu October 23, 2014 5:35 pm

An unusual government moratorium aimed at controversial research with high-risk viruses has halted important public health research, scientists told an advisory committee to the federal government on Wednesday.

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Business
4:09 am
Thu October 23, 2014

What The New Factory Worker Should Know

Originally published on Thu October 23, 2014 7:15 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

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Sports
3:47 am
Thu October 23, 2014

Die-Hard And Fair-Weather Fans Alike Have A Case Of Royals Fever

Originally published on Thu October 23, 2014 6:14 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

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Politics
3:47 am
Thu October 23, 2014

Democratic Climate Activist Is Election's Biggest Donor — That We Know Of

Tom Steyer recently said in a video that "climate change is not just an important issue, it's the issue. And we need leaders who will take it seriously."
Isaac Brekken Getty Images

Originally published on Thu October 23, 2014 3:14 pm

Liberal billionaire Tom Steyer has spent an astonishing $58 million this election cycle, more than any other donor in the traditional, fully disclosed part of the political system. He recently gave $15 million to a superPAC.

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Sports
3:47 am
Thu October 23, 2014

World's Best Bucking Bull About To Retire

Originally published on Thu October 23, 2014 6:14 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

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The Two-Way
11:20 pm
Wed October 22, 2014

Health Officials Announce New Monitoring For Travelers From West Africa

Bellevue Hospital nurse Belkys Fortune (left) and Teressa Celia, associate director of infection prevention and control, during a demonstration of procedures for possible Ebola patients on Oct. 8.
Richard Drew AP

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention announced new monitoring measures for people arriving to the U.S. from Liberia, Sierra Leone, and Guinea, the three countries dealing with Ebola outbreaks.

Travelers from those countries will be monitored by public health officials for 21 days after their arrival, starting Monday. The CDC says 21 days is "the longest time it can take from the time a person is infected with Ebola until that person has symptoms of Ebola."

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The Two-Way
7:22 pm
Wed October 22, 2014

Another Man Jumps White House Fence, But Is Stopped On The Lawn

Secret Service respond on the North Lawn of the White House after a man jumped the White House fence Wednesday night. This latest incident comes about a month after a previous fence-jumper sprinted across the lawn, past armed uniformed agents, and entered the Executive Mansion.
Jacquelyn Martin AP

Originally published on Wed October 22, 2014 11:40 pm

A month after a man armed with a knife leapt the White House fence and got deep into the first floor of the building, another man made a run across the North Lawn Wednesday night.

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Environment
4:26 pm
Wed October 22, 2014

Coping In A Drier World: California's Drought Survival Strategy

The San Luis Reservoir in central California is the largest "off-channel" reservoir in the U.S. It is currently at less than 30 percent of its normal capacity.
Kirk Siegler NPR

Originally published on Wed October 22, 2014 6:44 pm

The past few years have been California's driest on record. Forecasters predict that punishing droughts like the current one could become the new norm.

The state uses water rationing and a 90-year-old water distribution system to cope until the rains come. The system is a huge network of dams, canals and pipes that move water from the places it rains and snows to places it typically doesn't, like farms and cities.

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The Two-Way
3:36 pm
Wed October 22, 2014

NHTSA Adds More Than 3 Million Vehicles To Air Bag Recall

Takata Ignition Systems in Schoenebeck, Germany, which makes air bags. Millions of automobiles have been recalled because of a defect in the air bags' inflators.
Jens Meyer AP

Originally published on Wed October 22, 2014 4:07 pm

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration has once again changed the number of cars included in a massive and urgent recall over an inflator defect in air bags made by the Japanese company Takata.

Initially, 4.7 million vehicles were recalled, but in a list released on Wednesday, NHTSA added 3.1 million additional vehicles.

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