U.S.

Shots - Health News
4:24 pm
Mon March 2, 2015

Walk A Little Faster To Get The Most Out of Your Exercise Time

Government guidelines say exercising 2.5 hours a week will keep you healthy, but a study says you can get the job done in less time if you rev it up.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Mon March 2, 2015 4:43 pm

Some people — who are they? — have no problem fitting regular aerobic exercise into their lives. The rest of us want to know how much we have to exercise to see health benefits. Now we have some answers: You may want to go just a tad longer and harder than you'd thought.

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Law
3:58 pm
Mon March 2, 2015

High Court Case Tests Independent Redistricting Commissions

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Around the Nation
3:58 pm
Mon March 2, 2015

L.A.'s Skid Row Tense After Fatal Police Shooting Of Homeless Man

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Law
3:19 pm
Mon March 2, 2015

Community Policing Task Force Calls For Better Training, More Transparency

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

World
3:17 pm
Mon March 2, 2015

Netanyahu Insists D.C. Visit Not Intended To Pull Israel Into Partisan Debate

Originally published on Mon March 2, 2015 3:58 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Politics
3:17 pm
Mon March 2, 2015

Sen. Mikulski, 'Ground-Breaker' For Women Legislators, Won't Seek Reelection

Mikulski, left, and her then-opponent Linda Chavez hold hands before the Maryland Senate candidates debate in 1986.
J. Scott Applewhite AP

Originally published on Mon March 2, 2015 4:15 pm

A surprise political announcement Monday — the longest-serving woman in Congress, Democratic Sen. Barbara Mikulski of Maryland, said she will not seek reelection next year. Mikulski was first elected to the House in 1976, and 10 years later, was elected to the Senate.

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On Aging
3:17 pm
Mon March 2, 2015

GAO Report Suggests Fewer Antipyschotic Drugs For Dementia Patients

Originally published on Mon March 2, 2015 3:58 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Science
3:17 pm
Mon March 2, 2015

Science-Based Artist Gives Celebrity Tortoise A Second Life

Adam Cole NPR

Originally published on Mon March 2, 2015 4:34 pm

George Dante fell in love with taxidermy as a young child. His parents took him to the American Museum of Natural History in New York City, and he couldn't tear his eyes away from the dioramas in the Hall of African Mammals.

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The Two-Way
2:22 pm
Mon March 2, 2015

Task Force Calls For Independent Probes Of Police-Involved Shootings

Originally published on Mon March 2, 2015 3:59 pm

Law enforcement agencies should measure community trust the same way they monitor crime rates. That's among the recommendations of a task force established after police-involved killings of unarmed black people in Ferguson, Mo., in Cleveland and on Staten Island, N.Y.

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Shots - Health News
2:18 pm
Mon March 2, 2015

Take The ACE Quiz — And Learn What It Does And Doesn't Mean

Robert Wood Johnson Foundation; Source: CDC

An ACE score is a tally of different types of abuse, neglect, and other hallmarks of a rough childhood. According to the Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE) study, the rougher your childhood, the higher your score is likely to be, and the higher your risk for later health problems. You can take the test below:

So, you've got your score. Now what?

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Shots - Health News
2:02 pm
Mon March 2, 2015

Can Family Secrets Make You Sick?

Maria Fabrizio for NPR

Originally published on Mon March 2, 2015 4:07 pm

In the 1980s, Dr. Vincent Felitti, now director of the California Institute of Preventive Medicine in San Diego, discovered something potentially revolutionary about the ripple effects of child sexual abuse. He discovered it while trying to solve a very different health problem: helping severely obese people lose weight.

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The Two-Way
12:29 pm
Mon March 2, 2015

Clinton's Portrait Has Hint Of Lewinsky's Blue Dress, Artist Says

Artist Nelson Shanks' 2005 portrait of former President Clinton, which hangs at the Smithsonian Institution's National Portrait Gallery.
National Portrait Gallery, Nelson Shanks AP

Here's a story about that blue dress. No – not that blue dress.

Artist Nelson Shanks, who has painted royalty, popes and world leaders, tells the Philadelphia Daily News that his portrait of President Clinton for the National Portrait Gallery has a not-so-obvious reference to the infamous blue dress worn by Monica Lewinsky, the White House intern with whom Clinton had an affair.

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The Two-Way
12:16 pm
Mon March 2, 2015

Wages And Prices: A Welcome Breakup

Bigger paychecks plus lower prices add up to more buying power for consumers.
DNY59 iStockphoto

Originally published on Mon March 2, 2015 12:49 pm

A new government report confirms: Wages and prices are going their separate ways.

This breakup is helping consumers on the rebound from recession.

Fresh evidence of the split came Monday in the Commerce Department's monthly report on personal spending, income and saving. It showed paychecks are fatter, prices are leaner and Americans are saving more.

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Code Switch
12:03 pm
Mon March 2, 2015

The Man Behind The Speech: Judge Carlton Reeves Takes On Mississippi's Past

District Judge Carlton Reeves has presided over key race and equality cases in Mississippi.
Courtesy of Jackson State University

In a Mississippi courtroom in February, three young white men were sentenced for a hate crime: beating up a black man in a parking lot one June night in 2011, running over his body with a truck and leaving him to die. U.S. District Judge Carlton Reeves, who heard the case, asked the young men to settle into their chairs before he delivered their sentence. He had something to tell them.

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The Two-Way
10:59 am
Mon March 2, 2015

Sen. Barbara Mikulski, Congress' Longest-Serving Woman, To Retire

Longtime Maryland Democrat Barbara Mikulski has served in the Senate since 1987.
Mark Wilson Getty Images

Originally published on Mon March 2, 2015 12:56 pm

Updated at 12:15 p.m. ET.

Sen. Barbara Mikulski, D-Md., who has served in the Senate and in Congress longer than any other woman, says she will not seek a sixth term in 2016.

Mikulski, 78, announced her decision Monday in Baltimore.

" 'Do I spend my time raising money, or do I spend my time raising hell?' " she said she asked herself, according to The Associated Press.

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The Two-Way
9:20 am
Mon March 2, 2015

Video Shows LA Police Shot And Killed Man On Sidewalk

A cellphone video captured the deadly struggle between Los Angeles police officers and a man on a city sidewalk (in background). Seconds after this image appears in the video, shots were fired that killed the man, a robbery suspect.
Anthony Blackburn Facebook

Originally published on Mon March 2, 2015 12:46 pm

An altercation Sunday in Los Angeles in which police killed a man in the Skid Row area is putting new scrutiny on law enforcement's use of deadly force. Police say the man tried to grab an officer's weapon. A dramatic video posted online shows the man was on the ground struggling with officers when he was shot.

The LAPD says two officers sustained minor injuries and were treated and released. Police say three officers fired their weapons.

Here's a summary of what happened:

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NPR Ed
7:03 am
Mon March 2, 2015

College: I'll Only Go If I Know (That I Can Afford It)

New research shows that when students think they can afford college, they're more likely to go to college.
Elissa Nadworny NPR

Originally published on Mon March 2, 2015 2:43 pm

It's Financial Aid Week here at the NPR Ed Team (not really, but it sure feels like it). And we're kicking things off with a nostalgia nugget for all you children of the '80s.

The old G.I. Joe animated series famously ended with the phrase, "Now I know! And knowing is half the battle."

It's a catchy line and, it turns out, eerily relevant when it comes to high school seniors debating their college options.

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Middle East
5:18 am
Mon March 2, 2015

Netanyahu To Preview Speech To Congress Before AIPAC Conference

Originally published on Mon March 2, 2015 7:15 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The Two-Way
4:09 am
Mon March 2, 2015

Nurse Treated For Ebola To Sue Texas Hospital

Nina Pham, 26, who became the first person to contract Ebola within the United States, tells the Dallas Morning News that she worries about continued health issues and will sue the hospital where she contracted Ebola.
Uncredited AP

Nurse Nina Pham tells the Dallas Morning News that while she is Ebola free, she suffers residual effects from contracting the disease from a patient she cared for last fall at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital Dallas.

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Shots - Health News
3:06 am
Mon March 2, 2015

People With Low Incomes Say They Pay A Price In Poor Health

Hanna Barczyk for NPR

Originally published on Mon March 2, 2015 8:37 am

When you ask people what impacts health you'll get a lot of different answers: Access to good health care and preventative services, personal behavior, exposure to germs or pollution and stress. But if you dig a little deeper you'll find a clear dividing line, and it boils down to one word: money.

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Shots - Health News
3:04 am
Mon March 2, 2015

Poll Explores Our Perception Of How Factors Large And Small Shape People's Health

Alyson Hurt/NPR

Originally published on Mon March 2, 2015 2:09 pm

We often think of health as a trip to the doctor or a prescription to treat or prevent diseases. Or maybe it's an operation to fix something that's gone wrong.

But a new poll by NPR, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health reveals that Americans perceive health as being affected by a broad range of social and cultural factors.

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Law
3:03 am
Mon March 2, 2015

Supreme Court To Weigh Power Of Redistricting Commissions

Arizona state Sen. Andy Biggs flips through redistricting maps during a special legislative committee hearing to discuss the state commission's proposed maps in 2011.
Ross D. Franklin AP

Originally published on Mon March 2, 2015 4:06 pm

Take a look at a congressional district map, and it can look like a madman's jigsaw puzzle. The reason is, in part, that the district lines are drawn by state legislators seeking to maximize partisan advantage. It's a process that critics say is responsible for much that's wrong with Washington.

That's why some states have tried setting up independent commissions to draw the map. Arizona voters created such a commission in 2000. But when the commission chair displeased the governor and state Senate, they tried, unsuccessfully, to remove her.

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U.S.
2:58 am
Mon March 2, 2015

A Nearly Recession-Proof City Is Not Slowing Down

Lincoln has invested hundreds of millions of dollars in revitalizing its downtown, a historic area called Haymarket, to create a more culturally vibrant urban center that is helping the city keep and attract young adults.
David Schaper NPR

Originally published on Mon March 2, 2015 7:15 am

At 2.5 percent, Lincoln, Neb., has one of the lowest jobless figures in the country. But that's nothing new — the city has ranked at or near the top of the nation, with one of the lowest unemployment rates for years, even during the Great Recession.

But on a recent visit, it's clear that Lincoln is not resting on its laurels. It's working hard at keeping and drawing talent to this city of nearly 300,000.

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The Two-Way
7:46 pm
Sun March 1, 2015

Minnie Miñoso, Major League Baseball's First Black Latino Star, Dies

Minnie Miñoso smiles in front of a sculpture of him before throwing out the ceremonial first pitch at U.S. Cellular Field. Major League Baseball's first black Latino star, Miñoso died March 1, 2015.
Nam Y Huh AP

Major league baseball legend Minnie Miñoso, known as the Cuban Comet and Mr. White Sox, has died. Miñoso, who hailed from Havana, Cuba, played 12 of his 17 seasons with the Chicago White Sox, after getting his start in the majors with the Cleveland Indians in 1949.

The left fielder hit 135 homers and 808 RBIs for the White Sox. His number 9 was retired by the team in 1983, and today there's a statue of Miñoso at the field where the White Sox play.

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Code Switch
4:29 pm
Sun March 1, 2015

How Pittsburgh's Freedom House Pioneered Paramedic Treatment

Freedom House paramedics, who first were deployed in the 1960s, provided a crucial service for Pittsburgh residents. The program became a national model for emergency medical transport and care.
Courtesy of University of Pittsburgh

In the 1960s, Pittsburgh, like most cities, was segregated by race. But people of all colors suffered from lack of ambulance care. Police were the ones who responded to medical emergency calls.

"Back in those days, you had to hope and pray you had nothing serious," recalls filmmaker and Hollywood paramedic Gene Starzenski, who grew up in Pittsburgh. "Because basically, the only thing they did was pick you up and threw you in the back like a sack of potatoes, and they took off for the hospital. They didn't even sit in the back with you."

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Around the Nation
4:29 pm
Sun March 1, 2015

A Standout Student, A Star At Goldman Sachs — And Undocumented

Julissa Arce's tourist visa expired when she was 14. She excelled in high school, college and at Goldman Sachs for years before she finally became a U.S. citizen.
Morrigan McCarthy for ELLE.com Courtesy Julissa Arce

Originally published on Sun March 1, 2015 6:58 pm

Julissa Arce was born in Mexico, and came to the United States on a tourist visa when she was 11. It expired a few years later — but Arce didn't leave. Instead, she excelled in high school and college, then secured a job at Goldman Sachs. Her ascent was dramatic: she rose quickly from analyst to associate to vice president.

But Arce was scared to go to work every day, worried that her undocumented status would be uncovered and she'd be escorted out.

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The Two-Way
3:41 pm
Sun March 1, 2015

Kerry Tries To Calm Tensions Over Netanyahu Visit

Secretary of State John Kerry testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington, on Wednesday.
Carolyn Kaster AP

Secretary of State John Kerry, apparently hoping to patch a rift sparked by GOP lawmakers' decision to invite Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu to address Congress without first consulting the White House, says the administration doesn't want the speech to become a political football.

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The Two-Way
12:27 pm
Sun March 1, 2015

6 In 10 Young Republicans Favor Legal Marijuana, Survey Says

A user prepares to roll a marijuana cigarette on the first day of legal possession of marijuana for recreational purposes in the District of Colombia on Thursday.
Alex Brandon AP

Originally published on Sun March 1, 2015 8:28 pm

Nearly two-thirds of Millennials who identify as Republican support legalizing marijuana, while almost half of older GOP Gen-Xers do, according to a recently released Pew survey that could be an indicator of where the debate is heading.

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The Two-Way
10:10 am
Sun March 1, 2015

Venezuela Cuts American Embassy Staff, Restricts U.S. Travel

Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro waves to supporters during a march in Caracas, Venezuela, on Saturday.
Xinhua/Landov

Originally published on Mon March 2, 2015 4:00 pm

Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro has announced a reduction in U.S. diplomatic staff in the country and restrictions on travel by U.S. citizens there –- as he accused Washington of "gringo" meddling.

The BBC reports:

"The president said that the US government had 100 employees working in Venezuela whereas Venezuela had 17 based in the US.

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The Two-Way
8:00 am
Sun March 1, 2015

ISS Spacewalkers Perform Tricky Cable, Antenna Installation

Astronaut Terry Virts points to his helmet as he sits inside the International Space Station on Wednesday.
AP

Originally published on Mon March 2, 2015 4:44 pm

Astronauts at the International Space Station have ventured outside to perform a challenging cable installation on their orbiting platform.

Spacewalkers Terry Virts and Butch Wilmore have 400 feet of cable to install as well as two sets of antennas.

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