U.S.

U.S.
5:19 pm
Tue September 2, 2014

MRAPs And Bayonets: What We Know About The Pentagon's 1033 Program

NPR

Originally published on Tue September 2, 2014 7:02 pm

Amid widespread criticism of the deployment of military-grade weapons and vehicles by police officers in Ferguson, Mo., President Obama recently ordered a review of federal efforts supplying equipment to local law enforcement agencies across the country.

So, we decided to take a look at what the president might find.

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Shots - Health News
4:14 pm
Tue September 2, 2014

Double Mastectomies Don't Increase Cancer Survival Rates

Double mastectomy has become increasingly popular as a breast cancer treatment, but it may not reduce cancer risk.
Sladjana Lukic iStockphoto

Originally published on Tue September 2, 2014 5:18 pm

More women are choosing to have bilateral mastectomies when they are diagnosed with early-stage breast cancer, even though there's little evidence that removing both breasts improves their survival compared with more conservative treatments.

The biggest study yet on the question has found no survival benefit with bilateral mastectomy compared with breast-conserving surgery with radiation.

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NPR Ed
4:11 pm
Tue September 2, 2014

Sounds From The First Day Of School

LA Johnson/NPR

Originally published on Tue September 2, 2014 5:50 pm

The day after Labor Day is traditionally the end of summer break and the start of the school year. But for students in many parts of the country, the school year has already started.

Whether you're struggling to find your classroom or remember your locker combination, the first day is a big one for students, teachers and families.

With millions of children headed back to school, we asked reporters from member stations around the country to bring us the sounds of that first day:

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Asia
4:10 pm
Tue September 2, 2014

North Korea Grants Interviews With American Detainees: To What End?

Originally published on Tue September 2, 2014 5:34 pm

Two U.S. news organizations, CNN and the Associated Press, were granted interviews with three men detained by North Korean authorities. To learn more about why, and what North Korea hopes to gain from the publicity, Melissa Block talks with Georgetown professor Victor Cha, the former director for Asian Affairs at the National Security Council.

News
3:50 pm
Tue September 2, 2014

State Dept. Officials Work To Verify Islamic State's Beheading Video

Originally published on Tue September 2, 2014 5:34 pm

In a new video released by the militant group Islamic State, American journalist Steven Sotloff appears to be killed by extremists associated with the group. U.S. officials are working to determine the video's authenticity.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The Two-Way
3:44 pm
Tue September 2, 2014

New U.S. Rules Protect Giant Bluefin Tuna

Originally published on Tue September 2, 2014 5:32 pm

In an effort to reduce the number of giant bluefin tuna killed by fishing fleets, the U.S. is putting out new rules about commercial fishing in the Gulf of Mexico and parts of the western Atlantic. The rules have special protections for giant bluefin — fish that have grown to 81 inches or more.

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Law
3:35 pm
Tue September 2, 2014

Should Local Police Get The Military's Extra Armored Trucks?

Page County, Va., Sheriff John Thomas received an MRAP for his department in May. "Is it overkill? Yeah, it is. I mean, for our use, it's more armor than we need. But it's free," he says.
David Welna NPR

Originally published on Tue September 2, 2014 6:14 pm

Mine-resistant, ambush-protected troop carriers, known as MRAPs, were built to withstand bomb blasts. They can weigh nearly 20 tons, and many U.S. troops who fought in Iraq and Afghanistan are alive today because of them. But many of the vehicles are now considered military surplus, so thanks to a congressionally mandated Pentagon program, they're finding their way to hundreds of police and sheriff's departments.

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Law
3:08 pm
Tue September 2, 2014

How A New Police Force In Camden Helped Turn The City Around

Originally published on Tue September 2, 2014 6:14 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Men In America
3:08 pm
Tue September 2, 2014

For Men's Rights Groups, Feminism Has Come At The Expense Of Men

Mike Buchanan gives his presentation, "Let's Get Political," at the International Conference on Men's Issues, held in June near Detroit. Buchanan founded a political party in the U.K., Justice for Men & Boys, in 2013.
Fabrizio Costantini Getty Images

Originally published on Tue September 2, 2014 3:42 pm

This summer, a few hundred men and a handful of women gathered in a VFW hall near Detroit to attend what organizers billed as the first International Conference on Men's Issues.

The crowd wasn't huge, but it was enthusiastic. The event was a real-world gathering organized by the website A Voice for Men, part of an informal collection of websites, chat rooms and blogs focused on what's known as the men's rights movement. Speaker after speaker insisted that history would remember this moment.

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Europe
3:08 pm
Tue September 2, 2014

Faced With Ukrainian Turmoil, NATO Considers New 'Rapid Reaction Force'

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Around the Nation
3:08 pm
Tue September 2, 2014

Homes On The Grange: The Storied Tents Of A Pa. Fair

Originally published on Tue September 2, 2014 5:34 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Law
3:08 pm
Tue September 2, 2014

Detroit's Fiscal Future Rests With A Federal Judge

Originally published on Tue September 2, 2014 6:14 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

All Tech Considered
11:10 am
Tue September 2, 2014

Using Technology To Counter Police Mistrust Is Complicated

Members of the Ferguson Police Department wear their new body cameras during a rally Saturday in Ferguson, Mo.
Aaron P. Bernstein Getty Images

Originally published on Tue September 2, 2014 12:17 pm

Outfitting police officers with body cameras seems to be the most concrete solution to come out of the police misconduct accusations in Ferguson, Mo. And the push for cameras extends far beyond the suburban Missouri police department — more than 153,000 people have signed a "We the People" petition to create a "Mike Brown Law" that would require all police to wear cameras.

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The Two-Way
8:48 am
Tue September 2, 2014

After Just Two Years, Huge Atlantic City Casino Shuts Down

A woman gathers shells along the ocean near the Revel Casino Hotel in Atlantic City, N.J., early Tuesday. The casino resort has closed, a little over two years after opening with the promise of helping to renew Atlantic City.
Mel Evans AP

Originally published on Tue September 2, 2014 11:24 am

After operating for only two years, the Revel Casino Hotel has closed down, part of a trend that will reportedly shutter a third of Atlantic City's big gambling halls by the end of September. It cost $2.4 billion to build the Revel facility.

"It's a tragedy," massage therapist Lori Bacum, who worked at the resort's spa, tells NJ.com. "There were some warnings, but none of us thought it would happen. We felt so safe, because this was the place that was going to take (the city) to a new level."

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Shots - Health News
8:04 am
Tue September 2, 2014

Sharing Risk Can Help Tame The Cost Of Infertility Treatment

Getting to this point can be very expensive if in vitro fertilization is involved.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Tue September 2, 2014 12:58 pm

Infertility treatment is a numbers game in some respects: How many treatments will it take to conceive a child? And how much can you afford?

Even as insurance plans are modestly improving their coverage of such treatments, clinics and others are coming up with creative ways to cover the costs to help would-be parents reduce their risk for procedures that can run tens of thousands of dollars. Some even offer a money-back guarantee if patients don't conceive, while one online program lets people pool some funding.

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Politics
6:01 am
Tue September 2, 2014

The Politics Of Calling In Sick

Women are more likely to take time off to care for a sick child or elderly adult, making mandatory paid sick leave a hot partisan topic.
Shutterstock

Originally published on Tue September 2, 2014 12:23 pm

Got the flu? Or a new baby? Perhaps a little one with chicken pox? In most countries, your employer must pay your wages if you stay home sick or to care for others. Not in America.

But a growing grass-roots movement aims to change that — starting with paid sick leave.

Already the movement has met some success. This past weekend, California became the second state in the country to mandate sick leave for employees.

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Business
4:07 am
Tue September 2, 2014

What's In A Name? Former Arthur Andersen Employees Spell It Out

Courtesy of Prime Group

Originally published on Tue September 2, 2014 9:01 am

Arthur Andersen is back. Or at least the old accounting firm's name will be, for the first time since its association with accounting scandals at Enron more than a decade ago.

The firm was criminally convicted — a decision that was later overturned, although that came too late to save the company.

As of Monday, a company called WTAS is adopting the Andersen name and, in doing so, hopes clients will have forgotten the bad associations.

'That Was The End'

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Around the Nation
2:31 am
Tue September 2, 2014

Detroit Bankruptcy Battle Begins In Federal Court

The murals by Diego Rivera and other works at the Detroit Institute of Arts would be safe from creditors under the plan before a bankruptcy judge Tuesday.
Carlos Osorio AP

Originally published on Tue September 2, 2014 9:04 am

Detroit's historic bankruptcy case is entering the home stretch. The crucial, final trial phase begins Tuesday in a Detroit courtroom.

The trial will decide the fate of a plan to wipe out billions of dollars in debt and help Detroit emerge from bankruptcy as a new, revitalized city.

This trial is a big deal, but don't expect anything with lots of courtroom drama. For one thing, it's federal bankruptcy court — and there's no jury.

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The Two-Way
9:49 pm
Mon September 1, 2014

NATO To Create New 'Spearhead' Force For Eastern Europe

NATO Secretary General Anders Fogh Rasmussen on Monday.
Yves Logghe AP

Originally published on Tue September 2, 2014 6:12 am

NATO leaders are expected to set up a rapid-response force to deploy quickly to eastern Europe to defend against potential Russian aggression at their meeting in Wales later this week.

The force of about 4,000 troops will be ready to move on 48 hours notice from a station in a member country close to Russia, The New York Times reported.

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Politics
5:06 pm
Mon September 1, 2014

Guns Boom In 2014 Campaign Ads

Image from Montana congressional hopeful Matt Rosendale's campaign ad, in which he shoots what he calls a government drone out of the sky.
YouTube

Originally published on Tue September 2, 2014 9:53 am

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Around the Nation
3:07 pm
Mon September 1, 2014

Golf Course Provides Oasis For Low-Income Kids

Originally published on Mon September 1, 2014 3:36 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

You're listening to ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News.

CORNISH: All summer, dozens of lower-income kids in Providence, Rhode Island learned golf. They spent their days on a nine-hole course, an oasis in a gritty neighborhood.

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Around the Nation
3:07 pm
Mon September 1, 2014

As Casinos Close, Atlantic City Tries To Pivot Focus Elsewhere

Originally published on Mon September 1, 2014 3:36 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Radio Diaries
3:07 pm
Mon September 1, 2014

40 Years After 'Working,' A View From The Driver's Seat

Studs Terkel circa 1970.
Courtesy of Studs Terkel Radio Archive/WFMT

Originally published on Tue September 2, 2014 9:04 am

In the early 1970s, radio host and oral historian Studs Terkel went around the country with a tape recorder, interviewing people about their jobs. He collected more than 130 conversations with a variety of people, including a waitress, a car parker, a jockey, a baseball player, a farm worker, a press agent and a sports team owner.

The result was Working: People Talk About What They Do All Day and How They Feel About What They Do. When it was published in 1974 it became a best-seller — something unprecedented for an oral history collection.

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The Two-Way
2:18 pm
Mon September 1, 2014

3 Americans Detained In North Korea Urge U.S. To Secure Their Release

Kenneth Bae, an American tour guide and missionary serving a 15-year sentence in North Korea, speaks to The Associated Press on Monday. Bae and two other detained Americans urged the U.S. to send a high-level emissary to secure their release.
Wong Maye-E AP

Originally published on Mon September 1, 2014 6:11 pm

Three Americans who have been detained in North Korea appealed today to the U.S. to send a senior representative to secure their release.

In interviews with CNN and The Associated Press, Kenneth Bae, Jeffrey Fowle and Matthew Miller detailed the conditions of their imprisonment and urged a quick resolution of their situations.

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The Two-Way
1:23 pm
Mon September 1, 2014

The Flight Of The Passenger Pigeon, Now 100 Years Extinct

Martha (right), an extinct passenger pigeon, at the Smithsonian's Natural history Museum in Washington. The passenger pigeon was once the world's most plentiful bird. Sept. 1 is the centenary of the bird's extinction.
Susan Walsh AP

Originally published on Mon September 1, 2014 1:56 pm

The Cincinnati Zoo held a commemorative event; the London Zoo stopped the clock outside its bird house at noon. The object of their memorials: Martha, the last passenger pigeon, who died exactly a century ago at the Cincinnati Zoo.

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Code Switch
12:55 pm
Mon September 1, 2014

To Model Manhood, Immigrant Dads Draw From Two Worlds

Lindolfo Carballo, an immigrant from El Salvador, meets his son, Raynel, outside school. In El Salvador, he says, families often "teach their boys one thing and their girls differently." He's trying to set a different example for his children.
Sarah Tilotta for NPR

Originally published on Mon September 1, 2014 3:53 pm

Lindolfo Carballo knows there's a stereotype about men like him. He grew up in San Miguel, El Salvador, he says, in a male-dominant culture.

"I'm coming from a so-called 'machista' country, right? I mean, in this country, we all think that Latin America, in general, is where machismo is promoted," Carballo says.

In many families in Latin America, he adds, "parents — fathers and even mothers — teach their kids that men are to be served by their sisters."

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The Two-Way
10:08 am
Mon September 1, 2014

Showboat Casino Is Latest In Atlantic City To Close Its Doors

A security guard blocks entrance to the closing Showboat Casino Hotel on Sunday in Atlantic City, N.J.
Mel Evans AP

Originally published on Tue September 2, 2014 4:38 am

The iconic Showboat casino in Atlantic City closed Sunday, the latest casualty of competition from gambling in other states.

Denise Miller of New Jersey says she was an employee on the first day in 1987 when the Mardi Gras-themed Showboat opened. Although she no longer works there, Miller came down to watch the closed sign hung on the boardwalk entrance.

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It's All Politics
8:53 am
Mon September 1, 2014

151 Years Later, Pickett's Charge Hero Gets Medal Of Honor

Gen. George Pickett
Brady-Handy Photograph Collection Library of Congress

Originally published on Mon September 1, 2014 1:33 pm

A century and a half after Pickett's Charge at Gettysburg, a 22-year-old Union officer whose heroics helped stop the rebels and turn the tide of the Civil War will finally receive the Medal of Honor.

The White House has announced that Lt. Alonzo Cushing will receive the award, ending a near three-decade campaign begun by a Wisconsin woman, now in her 90s, who lives on what had been the family farm where Cushing was born.

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Economy
8:21 am
Mon September 1, 2014

It Might Sound Stupid, But Maybe It Isn't The Economy This Time

Traders work on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange last week in New York City.
Spencer Platt Getty Images

Originally published on Mon September 1, 2014 5:44 pm

As they always do on Labor Day, political candidates will begin their campaign sprint to Election Day.

And for years, they have been running on simple advice: "It's the economy, stupid." But this time around the track, they may discover that many Americans want to hear about other issues as well.

Wait. What?

The economy is not the No. 1 issue?

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The Two-Way
7:51 am
Mon September 1, 2014

Judge Blocks Enforcement Of Louisiana's Abortion Law

Originally published on Mon September 1, 2014 6:21 pm

Louisiana's new abortion law requires doctors who perform abortions to have admitting privileges to a nearby hospital. But a lawsuit challenged the law on the basis that the requirement was medically unnecessary and would result in the closure of the state's abortion clinics. A federal judge on Sunday temporarily blocked the measure.

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