South Dakota v. Wayfair

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South Dakota is going to the U.S. Supreme Court to try to get online vendors to collect and remit sales taxes. Attorney General Marty Jackley is arguing the case on April 17. South Dakota's U.S. Representative Kristi Noem has sponsored a bill in Congress to try to accomplish the same thing through federal legislation.

Noem and Jackley, both Republicans, have announced they are running for governor of South Dakota.

Tribal reservations, as sovereign governments, have the authority to collect taxes. Eight tribes within South Dakota's boundaries, along with the National Congress of American Indians, are taking steps to make sure that authority remains intact.

On April 17, South Dakota goes before the U.S. Supreme Court to argue that out-of-state and online vendors should collect and remit sales taxes from South Dakota customers.

In The Moment ... January 17, 2018 Show 257 Hour 2

South Dakota attorneys will argue before the U.S. Supreme Court sometime this spring to make the case for requiring online sellers to collect state sales taxes from South Dakota customers.

This is an appeal the entire nation is watching, because it affects all tax-collecting states and the District of Columbia.

SDPB's Victoria Wicks explains the nuances of the case.

The U.S. Supreme Court has postponed South Dakota's attempt to get out-of-state vendors to collect sales taxes. The high court set the case on its conference calendar last Friday, with orders made public on Monday, Jan. 8.

A spokeswoman for the state Attorney General's office says the case will go to conference again next Friday, with an outcome to be announced on Tuesday, Jan. 16.