SDSU

seemayasmin.com

In The Moment ... October 17, 2017 Show 200 Hour 1

In The Moment ... October 4, 2017 Show 191 Hour 2

Pierre native and SDSU graduate Stephanie Arne brings her tiny house to Brookings and Sioux Falls as part of the Creative Animal Tour. Arne is the host of "Mutual of Omaha's Wild Kingdom." We talk small habitats and sustainability.

kdlt.com

In The Moment ... June 14, 2017 Show 114 Hour 1

Skyforce basketball is a staple in the Sioux Falls professional sports scene. Recently the NBA's Miami Heat purchased controlling interest of the team. In The Moment producer Chris Laughery talks with president of the Sioux Falls Skyforce Mike Heineman about the future of the team in South Dakota.

www.earth.columbia.edu

Columbia University ecologist Ruth DeFries discusses how global prosperity benefits people and nature. Dr. DeFries is the author of The Big Ratchet: How Humanity Thrives in the Face of Natural Crisis. She speaks Thursday night at South Dakota State University in Brookings for the Holtry Lecture.

Robin Shulman

Freelance journalist Robin Shulman of New York City comes to South Dakota State University for the Pulitzer Center of Crisis Reporting visit. Her lecture is called "In Canada, People Like You & Me Can Sponsor Syrian Refugees. Here's What Happens." Shulman talks about her work covering immigration, poverty, urban policy, and other issues in U.S. cities, the Middle East and other parts of the world.

Heat Wave Could Hurt Corn Yield

Jul 19, 2016
South Dakota State University

Extension experts warn some of the state’s corn crop could fall victim to the hot, dry weather this week.  The crop is now in a stage of pollination.  Officials say excessive heat at this point in the season can affect corn yield for the year.

Agriculture experts worry the current drought and heat wave conditions in the state are not good for the corn crop.   Jonathan Kleinjan is a crop production associate at SDSU.  

“Heat in itself is not necessarily a big problem, it’s when you’re hot and dry at the same time," says Kleinjan.

SDSU

The five-year walleye tagging project, which is in its final year, focuses on the Missouri River from the Oahe Dam near Pierre, South Dakota, north to the Garrison Dame near Riverdale, North Dakota. Researchers have tagged 26,132 fish in the last three years. Researchers hope to understand the basic science of angler harvest and how food sources and flooding impact the walleye population. We talk with researcher Brian Graeb and his doctoral student Eli Felts.

SDSU

South Dakota has positioned itself to catalyze biotech research and development through an innovative virtual center with more than 30 affiliated researchers. Called BioSystems Networks & Translational Research, or BioSNTR, it was formed nearly two years ago and now is launching its capabilities on a larger scale. BioSNTR Director Adam Hoppe discusses the statewide collaborative endeavor, which includes participants from South Dakota’s public universities, private colleges and the public and private sectors.

Researchers at SDSU want to better predict the risk for West Nile Virus in the state. They’re using maps from NASA to help forecast what the season might look like.

 

Jason McEntee facilitates the Literature and Medicine Program at the Sioux Falls VA Medical Center. As they wrap up another session, McEntee (Associate Professor and head of the English department at SDSU) joins Dakota Midday host Lori Walsh to explore the intersection between war, literature, and the healing professions. 

When asked about reading recommendations, McEntee gave these:

Study Forecasts Consequences Of Changing Landscape

Apr 5, 2016
Kealey Bultena

SDSU researchers predict that over the next two decades, the amount of land used for growing crops in the northern Great Plains will increase. They say that means the amount of grassland will decrease, creating some potential risks.

Teri Finneman, SDSU professor of journalism, discusses her new book, Press Portrayals of Women Politicians, 1870s-2000s: From “Lunatic” Woodhull to “Polarizing” Palin. She joins Dakota Midday during a year when a woman is running for president of the United States and two women are vying for a seat in the US House of Representatives. We’ll talk about media coverage of female politicians, as well as the responsibility of journalists in coverage of female and male public figures.

Jon Lauck is chair of the Midwestern History Association. He is an author, a professor, and a lawyer. He has written several books, including "The Lost Region: Toward a Revival of Midwestern History."

John Miller is an author, historian, and professor. His "Small-Town Dreams: Stories of Midwestern Boys Who Shaped America" was released in 2014.

Lauck and Miller join Dakota Midday host Lori Walsh to discuss the importance of Midwestern studies ... why it matters and what needs to be done to create a thriving field of study that values the places we call home.

Betty Ferrell, PhD., was named one of 30 visionaries in the field by the American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. She is the author of nine books and a fellow of the American Academy of Nursing.

The SDSU College of Nursing recently brought Ferrell to the state for a conversation about Spirituality and Ethics at the end of life. She sat down with Dakota Midday host Lori Walsh to talk about life, death, and mending fences.

The Summit League

The city of Flint, Michigan is struggling as its water crisis continues. Testing shows the city’s drinking water is contaminated with dangerous levels of lead. The problem has resulted in severe health issues, and in some cases death. One South Dakota student knows first hand what the city is going through.

 

USA Today

Deondre Parks, a senior guard for the South Dakota State University men's basketball team, joined the program to talk about being an SDSU Jackrabbit. Also, Parks is from Flint, Michigan, a community that has been plagued by contaminated water. He has family who still lives there - battling the issue of water on a daily basis. In his conversation with SDPB's Nate Wek, Parks explains the situation his family is currently facing. He also speaks of the support he has received from his teammates and coaches, and from the community of Brookings.

South Dakota State University

Immunologist Eduardo Huarte is working on how to use probiotics to help immunotherapies that fight cancer cells.  His work focuses on how a person's diet affects the bacteria within the digestive system, known as the gut microbiome, and in turn, how the immune system's ability to fight cancer is affected.  Huarte is an assistant research professor with South Dakota State University's Department of Food Science and Nutrition.

Wound Healing

Jan 22, 2016
South Dakota State University

Mark Messerli, Assistant Professor of Biology and Microbiology at South Dakota State University, focuses his research on the building and rebuilding of tissues and organs.  He works on skin and how cells get injured, how they communicate during injury and the mechanisms they use for repair.  Wounds can have a huge impact on animals and humans.

South Dakota State University

South Dakota State University assistant professor Natalie Thiex's lab focuses on figuring out how the vesicles and organelles within the cytoplasm of white blood cells, or macrophages, work.  These include endosomes, macropinsomes and lipid droplets.  She joined Cara Hetland on Innovation to he work which looks at how understanding basic cell function can help improve human health.

South Dakota State University

Michael Gonda, Associate Professor of Animal Science at South Dakota State University, is seeking to understand biological differences between bulls with high and low fertility.  It appears that certain molecules called "small RNAs" can be linked to differences in male fertility.  Evidence suggests that small RNAs are involved in spermatogenesis.  Gonda's lab has begun to identify small RNA molecules that are associated with male fertility.

With 116 years of unbroken data, the annual Christmas Season Bird Count continues nationwide. Professor K.C. Jensen and volunteer birder Michael Melius share what it's like to count birds in the middle of a South Dakota winter. From climate change to invasive species to the misplaced Great Kiskadee, the state of migratory birds tells scientist more about the natural world than might be expected.

SDSU

Chronic muscle weakness presents strength and mobility challenges for those with Multiple Sclerosis. Cara Hetland talks with Dr. Bradley Bowser, director of the biomechanics laboratory in the Department of Health and Nutritional Sciences department at SDSU. Dr. Bradley discusses his research into how exercise might combine with cognitive behavioral therapy to improve quality of life for those living with MS.

Dakota Midday: Sigma Xi Winner

Nov 24, 2015
Sigma Xi

Simeon Gilbert, a senior physics major from Lennox, won first place in the Sigma Xi national research competition.  The student research conference was held in Kansas City.  Gilbert won in the physics, astronomy and engineering category for his research work and a superior rating on his poster.  Parashu Kharel, Assistant Professor of Physics at South Dakota State University, discussed Gilbert's work with guest host Lori Walsh.

Dakota Midday: Treating Aortic Aneurysms

Nov 19, 2015
South Dakota State University

Dr. Stephen Gent, Associate Professor in the Mechanical Engineering Department at South Dakota State University in Brookings, is part of a Sanford research team that has developed a better stent for treating aortic aneurysms.  Gent used computational fluid dynamics modeling to model blood flow through the new and improved stent.  Gent visited with Dakota Midday guest host Jackelyn Severin.

Dr. Andrew Curtis is a former director of the World Health Organization's Collaborating Center for Remote Sensing and GIS for public Health. He uses geospatial technologies and geographic information system (GIS) analysis to support neighborhood scale intervention strategies. He has developed a spatial video methodology for use in mapping any challenging environment and monitoring post-disaster recovery.

He spoke Thursday evening as part of the SDSU Speaker Series: Holtry Lecture: Mapping Challenging Environments  

Nutritional recommendations that help astronauts solve health problems associated with extended stints in space can also help patients on Earth, according to nutritional biochemist Scott M. Smith of the NASA Johnson Space Center. 

Smith will discuss space flight nutrition and its implications for those on Earth and on the International Space Station, Nov. 12, at 7 p.m. in the Campanile Room of the University Student Union. The event is free and open to the public.

Interview with Chris Voelz, executive director, College Women’s Sports Awards.  Voelz delivers her Harding Lecture Series talk, “From Towels to Trophies: 43 Years of Title IX in College Athletics,” Thursday, November 12 at 7:00 p.m.

www.baladino.com

Baladino performs centuries-old melodies and revels in sound carried to Israel from Spain, Eastern Europe, Turkey and Arabic countries.  With its members hailing from Berlin and Tel Aviv, Baladino offers fresh, deeply authentic interpretations of traditional Jewish Saphardic and Ladino melodies.  During their week-long residency, the group is participating in workshops at South Dakota State University, the Children's Museum, the Brookings School District and the Brookings Activity Center.  A public concert is scheduled for Thursday (10/15) at the Performing Arts Center on the SDSU campus. 

www.pbs.org

West River political junkies Denise Ross and Kevin Woster participated in the weekly Dakota Political Junkies segment.  Ross attended last night's "Daschle Dialogues" event on the South Dakota State University campus as the former Senator visited with former Secretary of State Madeleine Albright.  The Junkies also visited about last night's Democratic Presidential Debate hosted by CNN.

SDSU

Weiwei Zhang, professor of Sociology at South Dakota State University in Brookings.  Zhang is the new state demographer and director of the state data center.  She discusses immigration, growing diversity and changing demographics in South Dakota.

Pages