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Hands-on experience gives teachers leg up on bike safety

5 hours ago

Dateline:
Quick — how do you signal a turn on a bicycle? Teachers and school staff brushed up on that and much more Monday at a hands-on training meant to help more Minnesota students walk and bike to school.

The training, run by the organization Bicycle Alliance of Minnesota, gave the educators lessons and tips for teaching students the rules of the road when it comes to walking and biking.

Sherry Ott has been all over the world. Borneo, Mongolia, Nepal — she writes about travel for a living.

But Antarctica was different.

It’s “the closest you can get to leaving this planet," Ott says. “This was the first place ever that I had been where clearly people were not in charge.”

www.whitenosesyndrome.org

In The Moment ... June 8, 2018 Show 354 Hour 2

White-nose syndrome has been spreading west and now its been discovered in bats in South Dakota.

Silka Kempema, Wildlife Biologist for South Dakota Game, Fish and Parks, and Kimberly Dickerson, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service White-Nose Syndrome Coordinator for the Mountain/Prairie Region, visit about what this means for the bat population and conservation.

Dateline: St. Paul
St. Paul families are making plans for new school start times after the district published school-by-school information this week.

The change will shift most middle and high schools to a later start beginning in the fall of 2019 in an effort to accommodate teenagers' sleep patterns.

Under the plan, most elementary schools will either remain at their current 9:30 a.m. start time or move to an earlier 7:30 a.m. start.

Chocolate, Caffeine, Alcohol: What's OK on a Plant-Based Diet?

Jun 5, 2018

This spring, the documentary “Eating You Alive” played in select theaters for a special one-night showing. Like documentaries “Forks Over Knives” and “What the Health,” the film focuses on the benefits of a low-fat, plant-based diet, featuring folks who were able to radically improve their health by adopting certain eating habits.

Which Top New Species of 2018 Are You?

May 30, 2018

Did you know that about 18,000 new species are named every year? While that statistic might make it sound like a lot of new animals and plants are being discovered—and hopefully protected—all the time, about 20,000 species are also going extinct every year, International Institute for Species Exploration founding director Quentin Wheeler said in a news release.

A strange thing happened here in Boston over the weekend: The temperature got above freezing.

The massive dumps of snow here this winter have been bad enough, but it's the cold that's really done us in, an unbroken stretch of frigid weather that’s made Massachusetts feel more like Montreal — or Anchorage.

In a city bursting with 20th century history and 21st century glitz, the scrap of Berlin I’ve found myself in on a grey winter’s morning is the definition of ordinary, an American-style mini-mart /gas station where my companions and I are ordering bad coffee to a soundtrack of generic schmaltzy pop.

No one knows for sure what started the West Africa Ebola outbreak, which has killed 10,000 people. But some scientists think it might have begun with a 2-year-old Guinean boy, a hollowed out tree he liked to play in, and a colony of free tailed bats that lived in it.

So the idea of standing in a grove of trees in central Tanzania below hundreds of roosting fruit bats isn’t exactly comforting. But it’s the kind of place the researchers I’m with need to be.

Chris Laughery

Dr. Ranjit Koodali is the Dean of the Graduate School and Professor of Chemistry at the University of South Dakota. He joins us each month to discuss the latest research in chemistry. It’s grilling season and this month we’re talking about a process of filtering out carcinogens from smoke flavoring.

smithsonianmag.com

Melissa Hamersma Sievers discusses watching the Rube Goldberg Day at Riggs High School in Pierre. This project has been an annual tradition for nearly 20 years. Rube Goldberg was a Pulitzer Prize winning cartoonist, sculptor and author. His cartoons serve as an inspiration to aspiring engineers and scientists across the world.

Lori Walsh

Christine Wood – 4-H Science Technology Engineering and Math (STEM) Field Specialist. Discusses a competition where South Dakota teens applied research methods to answer real-world questions impacting our state’s number one industry of Agriculture through SDSU Extension 4-H Science of Agriculture project. This nine-month research project is designed to expose teens to the engineering process. The question the students answered was: What are the most profitable range management practices that are good for cattle production, soil/range health, and will build pheasant populations?

Live, from New York, it’s Cue Card Wally

May 24, 2018

Last season, TV personality and comedian Seth Meyers served as the host of the 75th edition of the Golden Globes. Although the award show is completely run on teleprompters, Meyers insisted that someone hold up actual cue cards during the show as well — just in case there was some sort of technological glitch.

Not just anyone would do, though. It had to be longtime cue card holder Wally Feresten, who has worked with Meyers for a total of 14 years, beginning at NBC’s iconic comedy show “Saturday Night Live.”

Facebook founder and CEO Mark Zuckerberg left some European Parliament lawmakers and observers feeling displeased Tuesday after he failed to answer several questions during a Brussels meeting called in the wake of a user data privacy scandal involving his company and British data analytics firm Cambridge Analytica.

Lee Strubinger / SDPB

Researchers with the Majorana Demonstrator Collaboration have proven they can create an environment that  lets them see what’s called neutrino-less double beta decay.

Lingo aside, it’s a reaction that researchers say may help explain why matter exists.

The Yates is one of two shafts from the Homestake Mine that takes researchers down 4,850 feet.

Is the e-bike revolution ready to come to America?

May 17, 2018

I bike to work ... sometimes. I have a series of big hills — in each direction — that just kill me. So when I heard about a new, shiny red wheel born in the labs of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, I was intrigued.

“Everything is contained within the red hub: the battery, the motor, all the sensors,” says Megan Morrow, with the company Superpedestrian in Cambridge, Massachusetts, the maker of the “Copenhagen Wheel.”

The wheel is named for a challenge by the mayor of the Danish capital to get more people biking.

Submitted photo

Sanford Health physicians and leaders were among the international experts presenting at the Fourth International Vatican Conference in Rome on April 26-28. The conference brings together leaders in health care, science and research as part of the Cura Foundation conference.  This is the second time Sanford physicians have presented their work at this conference.  Jill Weimer is the senior director of therapeutic development and associate scientist at Sanford Research.

Bill Harris is President of OmegaQuant, LLC, a Sioux Falls laboratory. He’s also on the USD Medical School faculty and spent several years with Sanford Research as the Director of Cardiovascular Health. His recent study published in the Journal of Clinical Lipidology found that people with high blood levels of fish oil were 35 percent less likely to develop heard disease than people with low levels. And your Omega-3 level is a better predictor of disease risk than cholesterol.

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Joree Sandin is a recent graduate with a mechanical engineering major from South Dakota School of Mines and Technology. She is the student leader of the Moonrockers team consisting of 16 Tech students. The team is on its way to the 2018 NASA Robotic Mining Competition at the Kennedy Space Center. This event brings together more than 500 college students from around the country. The competition challenges students to design and build a robot that can mine the icy gravel from the planet Mars. 

Dateline: Minneapolis
A stormwater retention pond in the city of Ramsey has become a big draw over the years, with an adjacent amphitheater for summer concerts and green space for recreation. But The Draw, as it's appropriately named, also has a problem: ugly algae.

US and British scientific agencies announced their biggest joint Antarctic research effort in more than a generation on Monday.

The focus is Thwaites Glacier, which is roughly the size of Florida and sits on the western edge of Antarctica.

Ice melting on Thwaites accounts for 4 percent of global sea level rise, an amount that’s nearly doubled since the 1990s. Scientists in the new five-year research collaboration hope to determine how much more, and how fast, the glacier will melt as the world continues to warm.

If you get a robocall in Mandarin, just hang up

Apr 30, 2018

If you live in New York, Los Angeles or Boston, chances are good you've received a robocall in Mandarin.

"I get them also, in the NYPD building," says Donald McCaffrey, an officer with the New York Police Department’s Grand Larceny Division in Queens. "I have an NYPD department cell phone and I get them on the cell phone also. It is out of control."

McCaffrey, who is investigating the calls in New York, says they first came to his attention in December when a 65-year-old Chinese woman alerted the NYPD that she had been scammed out of $1.3 million.

There are several chemicals that have no taste or smell that could reach our drinking water without us realizing the inconspicuous harm they are causing. Then, there are some that have a particular property to them — such as smelling like licorice.

That is the case for MCHM, a chemical that was created to help in the washing of coal. Labeled as a coal flocculant, it has the ability to separate burnable fossil fuel from dirt and rock and other materials.

The mysterious aurora known as 'Steve,' explained

Apr 28, 2018

Thanks to collaboration between citizen scientists and astronomers, a strange phenomenon in the night sky, dubbed “Steve,” has finally been explained.

In 2017, a glowing purple-and-green ribbon across the heavens mystified sky-watchers because it showed up much further south than the famous northern lights, or aurora borealis. These observers decided to call it “Steve,” echoing the woodland creatures in the children’s movie "Over the Hedge."

Christian Widener, Chief Technology Officer and co-founder of VRC Metal Systems was awarded Entrepreneur of the Year for 2018 by South Dakota Governor’s Office of Economic Development. VRC Metal Systems manufactures cold spray equipment and advanced manufacturing systems. Widener is also an associate professor at South Dakota School of Mines and Technology and is director of the Arbegast Materials and Processing Laboratory, a research facility for advanced metals and processing.

Dr. Scott Dee is director of research with Pipestone Veterinary Services and is part of a group of researchers in veterinary and biomedical sciences who discovered that some foreign animal diseases can survive the journey from China in imported feed ingredients.

Dr. Amy Sanford, an oncologist with Sanford discusses the findings of a new study that shows greater survival for newly diagnosed advanced lung cancer patients who receive an immunotherapy drug plus standard chemotherapy. These results are expected to change the way patients are treated.

Talithia Williams Previews NOVA Wonders

Apr 23, 2018

In The Moment ... April 23, 2018 Show 321 Hour 2

NOVA tackles the biggest questions on the frontiers of science in a new six-part series called NOVA Wonders. The first episode airs on SDPB-TV this Wednesday at 8:00 p.m. Central.

One of NOVA Wonders' three hosts is mathematician Talithia Williams. Her TED talk "Own Your Body's Data" celebrates the power of personal data collection. She's the author of the book Power in Numbers: The Rebel Women of Mathematics.

Puerto Rico's power company said it had restored power to more than 1.1 million homes and businesses by Thursday morning after a transmission line failure cut service to almost all of the island's 3.4 million residents the day before.

The Puerto Rican Electric Power Authority, known as PREPA, was working to restore power to the less than 30 percent of customers in the US territory still without power after Wednesday morning's blackout.

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