Patrick Hicks

This week's podcast features a conversation with blues musician Davy Knowles, poetry from Patrick Hicks, and music from The Minneapolis Guitar Quartet.

Dakota Midday's Lori Walsh sat down with Sioux Falls Air Show coordinator Rick Tupper and Augustana professor Patrick Hicks to talk about the powerful history of aircraft. From heavier topics of World War II aircraft to a lighter mood of the annual hangar 1940's swing dance, the Joe Foss squadron aims to maintain the intergrity of traditional warbirds. The guests also stress the opportunity to appreciate military history and the accomplishments of veterans.

The Midday Book Nerds convene to discuss the top reads of 2015. Independent booksellers Peggy Stout (Prairie Pages, Pierre) and Jeff Danz (Zandbroz Variety, Sioux Falls) talk up the biggest local releases, the book club hits of the year, and the surprising trend of adult coloring books.

Dr. Patrick Hicks, Writer-in-Residence at Augustana University in Sioux Falls, and Liz Patro, a Portland, Oregon-based writer whose short stories and essays have appeared in over two-dozen literary journals and magazines join Dakota Midday.

The past 12 months have been big ones for Augustana College writer-in-residence Patrick Hicks. A year ago, he published his debut novel, The Commandant of Lubizec. He also came out with a new poetry collection, Adoptable. Hicks has just released his debut book of short stories, The Collector of Names.

On January 27th, 1945, the Auschwitz concentration camp in Nazi-occupied Poland was liberated by Soviet troops. Some 1.1 million people were killed there between 1940 and 1945. More people died at Auschwitz than at any other Nazi concentration camp. Soviet soldiers found about 7 thousand starving prisoners alive in the camp.

About 300 survivors returned to the site for ceremonies marking the 70th anniversary. Most were children at the time of the liberation, but are now elderly and this may be the last significant Auschwitz remembrance of their lifetimes.

Patrick Hicks

When writer Patrick Hicks and his wife were unable to have biological children, they adopted a little boy from South Korea. In his new book of poetry, Adoptable, Hicks shares the joys of fatherhood and imagines his son as he grows older. The book’s poems also examine what it means to adopt a child from another country and culture. In one poem he asks the question, “Did we do the right thing, importing you to the other side of the world, bringing you to the prairie and the ice?”