news

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Feb 20, 2017

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Feb 20, 2017

In 2014, South Dakota committed to using the services of Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium, or SBAC. The consortium is located at UCLA and provides testing of K-12 student achievement.

On Tuesday, Feb. 14, the South Dakota Supreme Court heard oral arguments from its opponents. Two South Dakota taxpayers filed suit through the Thomas More Law Center, an organization in Michigan that battles Common Core standards. The plaintiffs claim the consortium is an interstate compact requiring consent of the U.S. Congress and violates state and federal law.

In 2011, prison officer Ron Johnson was murdered by two inmates who were trying to escape. His widow, Lynette Johnson, sued the South Dakota Department of Corrections and certain of its employees, in particular then-Warden Doug Weber. She holds that prison officials knew the inmates were planning an escape, but concealed that information after the incident.

The suit has been dismissed by both a federal court and state court. Now Lynette Johnson has appealed to the South Dakota Supreme Court.

Victoria Wicks file photo

A package of legislation designed to address mental health issues in criminal justice has been presented to the legislature in Pierre. House Bill 1183 is assigned to the House Judiciary Committee.

Chief Justice David Gilbertson has led the effort to reduce recidivism and increase services to mentally ill people who often end up in jail.

Victoria Wicks

A psychologist from San Antonio's Haven for Hope came to Rapid City on Thursday, Feb. 2, to speak to a crowd of more than 200 people at the Dahl Arts Center. This was a second trip for Gilbert Gonzales. He also visited in 2011 to help city and county officials kick off plans for a comprehensive service center for homeless people. Gonzales says addiction and mental illness often underlie homelessness, and treating the issues can ultimately save taxpayers a lot of money.

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Jan 27, 2017

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Jan 27, 2017

Victoria Wicks

The Black Hills Celtic Society celebrates the birthday of Scots poet Robert Burns every year. The Bard of Scotland--the Ploughman's Poet--was born in the middle of the Eighteenth Century and died young. But before he went, he produced 12 children by four women and an impressive collection of poetry and song. His birthday, Jan. 25, is celebrated wherever Scots live throughout the world. And that includes Rapid City. SDPB's Victoria Wicks joined that group Saturday night.

Miss Weiss

On Saturday South Dakotans joined millions of people across the world for a one-day rally. The Women's March on Washington was established as a show of solidarity and a rallying cry that women's rights are human rights. Companion marches took place in all 50 states and across the globe.

In Rapid City, protesters filled the City Administration parking lot, marched through a few blocks of downtown, and then gathered in Memorial Park.

Sent by Suzan Nolan

One of the South Dakotans who joined the Women's March on Washington, D.C., was Suzan Nolan of Rapid City.

Nolan had initially made arrangements to travel to Hillary Clinton's inauguration. After Donald Trump's victory, Nolan heard about the Women's March and kept her plane ticket.

Nolan talks with SDPB's Victoria Wicks from Washington after the march.

SD Department of Corrections

It has been 17 years since Dottie Poage lost her son to murder. Three men were convicted of killing Chester Poage, and all three men have had different outcomes.

One of them is Briley Piper, waiting on death row in the South Dakota State Penitentiary.

On Tuesday, Jan. 17, he failed to have his death sentence overturned by a state judge in the Fourth Circuit.

Dottie Poage tells SDPB's Victoria Wicks that she has had to be patient all these years, watching Piper go through years of appeals to avoid execution.

Melissa Hamersma Sievers / SDPB

The importance of punctuation and grammar was at issue in the South Dakota Supreme Court on Wednesday. In a case involving open records, justices heard from lawyers representing the Argus Leader and the City of Sioux Falls. The dispute revolves around the wording of one short paragraph in the open records chapter and whether it allows government entities to keep records closed when they've entered into a contract. SDPB's Victoria Wicks reports.

Kealey Bultena / SDPB

South Dakota’s governor says he wants to fight methamphetamine by punishing bad behavior and reinforcing the good.

Governor Dennis Daugaard says he wants to offer incentives to beat addiction. He says he supports allowing offenders who complete court-ordered treatment in a year one opportunity to reduce a felony to a misdemeanor. Daugaard says he also supports mandatory jail time for people on probation or parole who fail drug tests.

Melissa Hamersma Sievers / SDPB

South Dakota inmate Daniel Charles came up before the South Dakota Supreme Court on Tuesday, Jan. 10. Charles' attorney asked for reconsideration of his 92-year prison sentence. Charles was 14 when he killed his stepfather in Meade County. He's now 32. He'll be 60 before he comes up for parole. His attorney argues that parole at retirement age doesn't allow Charles to have a meaningful life on the outside. SDPB's Victoria Wicks reports.

Burning Down To Rebuild In Rockerville

Jan 2, 2017

A prescribed fire in the small Black Hills town of Rockerville burned a significant number of historic buildings on Main Street and adjacent areas to the ground. SDPB’s Jim Kent was at the scene as more than 60 firefighters from companies across Pennington County took part in the event.

Rockerville is located in the heart of the Black Hills….just south of Rapid City.

Photo by Jim Kent

A prescribed fire in Rockerville burned down a significant number of buildings considered hazardous to the public from both a fire and safety perspective. We spoke with the property owner and with a local restaurateur about the benefits of destroying the buildings.

Victoria Wicks

Children at the Rapid City Public Library celebrated the new year a day and a half early. The "half" day comes about because they rang in the NOON year, counting down to 12 noon on Friday instead of 12 midnight on Saturday.

Children gathered on the second floor to make masks and crowns and then moved to the first-floor lobby for bagpipes, balloons, and a ball drop.

As SDPB's Victoria Wicks reports, the reviews were a rave: the first-time event was "awesome."

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Dec 28, 2016

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Dec 28, 2016

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Dec 28, 2016

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Dec 28, 2016

In a tightly divided decision, the South Dakota Supreme Court has ruled that plaintiffs in a medical liability case may see the records of patients who are not parties to the lawsuit. Three justices say state law allows release of records as long as the patients can't be identified. But two justices say state law is clear that there are no exceptions to privilege.

Photo illustration by Victoria Wicks

In Rapid City during Hanukah, Jews gather at Main Street Square for eight nights to light the menorah. The first night was Dec. 24, and the last night is Dec. 31. People gather just before sunset to sing Hanukah songs and celebrate the resiliency of the Jewish people.

The menorah lighting occurs every night at sunset, at about 5:10 p.m., ending with Dec. 31.

To hear a longer interview with Steve Benn, click on the audio below:

Kealey Bultena / SDPB

South Dakota’s two largest cities are breaking building permit records again. Rapid City is more than $50 million ahead of the previous top year. Sioux Falls is setting a record for the fourth year in a row, and the year isn't over yet.

Right now building permits in Rapid City are worth more than $310 million. Division manager of building inspections Brad Solon says Rapid City hit its previous record in November, so every permit since pushes the landmark higher.

Courtesy Black Hills National Cemetery

The Black Hills National Cemetery is taking part in the 10th annual holiday Wreaths Across America.  The event held on Friday is a wreath-laying ceremony to honor and remember our nation’s military veterans. The public is invited to attend the Wreaths Across American ceremony at Sturgis.The Worcester Wreath Company has donated wreaths for grave sites at Arlington National Cemetery since 1992.

courtesy photo

A federal judge has ordered Seventh Circuit and Pennington County officials to stop violating the Indian Child Welfare Act.

Judge Jeffrey Viken's order affects emergency hearings held within 48 hours of the removal of children from their parent or guardian's care.

The judge's order responds to a lawsuit filed in Rapid City in March 2013 and resolves seven of eight issues. SDPB's Victoria Wicks reports on this latest development.

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