Language

Michael O'Hara / michaelohara.me

In The Moment ... February 7, 2018 Show 272 Hour 2

Augustana University Associate Professor David O'Hara, PhD., recently returned from teaching a Tropical Ecology interim course for Augie students. The group traveled to Guatamala for lessons in ecology, language, and philosophy.

Jackie Hendry

Before colonization, the indigenous peoples of North America spoke nearly 500 different languages. Today, there are only 20 languages with enough speakers for a revitalization effort. 

Lakota is one of them.

The Lakota Language Consortium hosted a Lakota Language Weekend in South Dakota's largest city last weekend. 

Kealey Bultena

In The Moment ... November 20, 2017 Show 224 Hour 1

One year after an agreement between Kilian Community College and the University of Sioux Falls, USF's Bridges program continues to welcome people wanting to improve their proficiency in English. This month the University also cut the ribbon for the renamed Thomas Kilian Academic Success Center. We’re joined by Brett Bradfield, president of the University of Sioux Falls.

Lori Walsh

In The Moment ... November 16, 2017 Show 222 Hour 1

What does it mean to love someone in a language that’s not your own? Lauren Collins is a staff writer at "The New Yorker.” Her best-selling book is called "When in French: Love in a Second Language." It's now available in paperback. She joins us to talk about cultural identity, belonging, and life in translation.

Chris Laughery

In The Moment ... October 5, 2017 Show 192 hour 1

In 2015, South Dakota was the only state in the country that didn't have some kind of Chinese language opportunity in the public school system. That same year, Northern State University in Aberdeen established their Confucius Institute--a Chinese cultural and language education partnership with the University of Jinan in China. This fall, that partnership extended to Aberdeen's Central High School.

Dakota Midday: Roy Clark On Language

Jun 15, 2016
http://www.poynter.org/author/rclark/

Lori Walsh interviews author Roy Peter Clark. He joins Dakota Midday to talk about the importance of language when discussing breaking news, tragedy, and developing stories. From phrases such as “worst mass shooting” and designations such as “presumptive nominee,” Clark examines the value of ethics and usage when we discuss the stories of our times in ways that honor accuracy and truth. Roy Peter Clark has taught writing at  the Poynter Institute for Media Studies since 1979. He has served the Institute as its first full-time faculty member, dean, vice-president, and senior scholar.

All Lakota Language News Website Launches

Mar 24, 2016
www.woihanble.com

If you like to get your news in Lakota you can now do so online. A new all Lakota language website called Woihanble.com is now up and running. The word Woihanble translates to dream in English. The site is written completely in Lakota. It features news stories from tribal nations across South Dakota.

The website Woihanble is one of the latest efforts to in South Dakota revitalize the Lakota language. It translates local stories from news outlets that cover South Dakota reservations from English to Lakota.

Jenifer Jones / SDPB

Lawmakers in Pierre support two programs aimed at Native American education. One measure seeks to help people who want to finish college courses so they can teach in Native American schools. The other sets up a pilot program to combine innovative cultural teachings with standard subjects.

New BHFCU TV Commercial In Lakota

Jan 31, 2016

If you live in the Black Hills area you may have seen a recent commercial entirely in Lakota on TV.

It’s an advertisement for the Black Hills Federal Credit Union and it’s airing on every broadcast and cable TV network in the Hills area

Credit Union officials say they want to reach out to Lakota people in their own language.

Two Lakota versions of the BHFCU commercial are circulating, one with the Lakota female dialect and one with the male.  A third version of the commercial is in English.

Jenifer Jones

A state Senate panel is endorsing education plans that focus on supporting Native American students. One of those measures funds programs that focus on incorporating Indian culture and language into standard subjects. 


The Oglala Lakota College is receiving a grant of $25,000 from a tribe in Minnesota. The grant money will fund the Lakota immersion school for kindergarten through fifth grade students on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation. Leaders want to prevent the loss of the Lakota language.

The Shakopee Native American tribe in Minnesota is helping fund the Lakota language program. The grant will allow around 30 children to learn their native language at the childcare facility.

Laughter And Learning At The Lakota Language Bowl

Dec 23, 2014
Red Cloud Indian School / www.RedCloudSchool.org

The Lakota Nation Invitational concluded last week.  It’s one of the biggest events of the year in Rapid City featuring 2,500 students from schools across the region competing in everything from basketball to an art show.

LNI also incudes a Lakota Language Knowledge Bowl.  Organizers say it makes preserving the language fun for kids.

(Click play below to hear more.)

Rosalie Little Thunder Mourned In SD

Aug 11, 2014

Prominent Lakota language teacher, activist, author, artist and elder Rosalie Little Thunder died on August 9th at the age of 64.    Little Thunder’s work ranged widely from Lakota language preservation to restoring buffalo on the Great Plains.

The Legacy Of Albert White Hat

Jun 20, 2013

Wilhelm Meya, executive director of the Lakota Language Consortium, discusses the legacy of Albert White Hat, who was instrumental in teaching the endangered American Indian language to new generations for nearly four decades. White Hat died last week at the age of 74. White Hat authored several books on writing and reading Lakota, a language spoken fluently by fewer than 6,000 people. The average age of those speakers is 60, and less than 14-percent of the Lakota population in South Dakota and North Dakota - where the vast majority of Lakota speakers live - speaks their native tongue.