Lakota

pewresearch.org

In The Moment ... August 29, 2017 Show 166 Hour 1

Lee Rainie is the director of internet and technology research at the Pew Research Center in Washington D.C.  He's also the former managing editor of U.S. News and World Report.  Rainie speaks at the South Dakota School of Mines and Technology today as part of the Black Hills Knowledge Network's Knowledge at Noon Speaker Series.  His presentation is titled "Facts, Public Trust and the Future of the Internet."

SDPB’s Jackie Hendry details the surprising history of Lakota performers in Brussels.

Lori Walsh

In The Moment ... April 11, 2017 Show 069 Hour 2

Changes to the way unclaimed property is handled has changed in the state. South Dakota’s state treasurer Rich Sattgast joins the program with details that might just save you money.

Mark St. Pierre wrote "Of Common Birth: Dakota Sons in Vietnam." A work of creative nonfiction, yet inspired by the true story of two South Dakotans, the book draws on archival research and first person interviews to tell the story of a Lakota man and a white man serving their country in Southeast Asia.

1881 Courthouse Museum

In The Moment ... April 10, 2017 Show 068 Hour 2

Dr. Kelvin Lim is vice-chair for research in the department of psychiatry at the University of Minnesota. He talked with Prairie Public’s Doug Hamilton about research into addiction. For thoughts on the mental health care crisis in South Dakota, tune in to South Dakota Focus with Stephanie Rissler on SDPB-TV this Thursday at 8 p.m. Central, 7 Mountain.

Lakota Filmmaker Receives Sundance Fellowship

Jan 19, 2017
Courtesy Willi White

A Lakota film maker from the Pine Ridge Reservation is on his way to this year’s Sundance Film Festival in Park City, Utah.  We spoke with Willi White about his work and what it means to be chosen for a fellowship in the Sundance Native Filmmaker Program.

Willi White’s interest in films goes back to his elementary years at the Red Cloud School.

Courtesy “Embracing Our Children’s Health”

When two severely malnourished and abused girls were found on the Pine Ridge Reservation last November….community members near and far gathered to take action. The newly-formed “Embracing Our Children’s Health” group focuses on empowering, encouraging, assisting, and supporting existing programs and organizations... for children and families on the reservation.Founder, Patty Pourier, says members are determined to make the organization an “action based group.”  

Wounded Knee Massacre Happened 126 Years Ago

Dec 29, 2016
Charles Michael Ray / SDPB

Thursday marked the 126 anniversary of the Wounded Knee Massacre that took place in South Dakota.
 
An estimated 300 Sioux Indians were killed by U.S. troops who were sent to disarm them. The infamous day is a constant reminder in Indian country.

Courtesy Cheyenne River Youth Project

The Cheyenne River Youth Project has announced the creation of a Lakota youth art institute on the Cheyenne River Sioux Reservation. TYe goal is to open students’ minds to greater opportunities in art while embracing the Lakota cultural view of art as a part of their everyday lifestyle.

Milo Yellow Hair On The 30th Anniversary Of The Big Foot Ride

Dec 7, 2016

Oglala Lakota Milo Yellow Hair has the kind of deep belly laugh that is absolutely contagious.  He is a lifelong resident of the Pine Ridge Reservation and he is well versed the value of humor within Lakota culture.  He lights up when telling a funny story or a joke.   Yellow Hair also has a serious side,  he is one of the founders of the Big Foot Ride. 

Photo by Jim Kent

The discovery of two severely malnourished and abused girls on the Pine Ridge Reservation has resulted in concern, anger and action from the local community.  Lakota tribal members living on Pine Ridge and in the surrounding area have come together with one goal in mind…ensuring that such a tragedy doesn’t happen again.

SDPB

Yesterday, the Army Corps of Engineers announced it would not grant the permits needed for the Dakota Access Pipeline to proceed as planned. The announcement spurred celebrations, questions, anger, joy and doubt. Lakota elders Charmaine Whiteface and Madonna Thunder Hawk discuss the role of prayer with respect to DAPL protests.

Contributed photo / fnsg.org

An installment in a downtown Rapid City park that celebrates the history of 20th century Lakota, Dakota and Nakota people is one step closer to getting installed.

The group behind the First Nations Sculpture Garden says they’ll make one final fundraising push in the spring before installing the sculptures in what is now called Halley Park.

The First Nations Sculpture Garden seeks to share  tribal history through the lens of four contemporary native people from the last 100 years.

Kealey Bultena / SDPB

A Lakota man is celebrating three decades teaching life lessons to elementary school students through Native American dance. Dallas Chief Eagle started working as an artist-in-residence for schools in the mid-1980s. Today he’s still sharing Lakota culture with school children across the state.

In his performance, Dallas Chief Eagle rapidly moves his feet as he glides across a gym floor, picking up plastic hoops. He links them together in a long line. Chief Eagle tosses the chain into the air, and spins the hoops over the heads of screaming elementary school students.

Lakota Audio Artifacts Returned To Oglala

Oct 13, 2016
Courtesy Arlo Iron Cloud

The chairman of the National Endowment for the Arts was in South Dakota over the holiday weekend. Jane Chu visited the Pine Ridge Reservation, the Black Hills Pow Wow and took part in two ceremonies that acknowledged Native American cultures – past and present. SDPB’s Jim Kent has the story.

NEA Chairman Jane Chu was in the Black Hills on a twofold mission. First was the repatriation of Oglala Lakota cultural audio artifacts from the American Folklife Center at the Library of Congress to Oglala Lakota College.

Dakota Midday: Dignity Dedication

Sep 19, 2016
SDPB

The 50 foot statue named Dignity now stands on the Missouri River bluff near Chamberlain. It depicts a young Lakota woman wrapping a star blanket around her shoulders.

SDPB's Charles Michael Ray attended the dedication. He shares some of his reflections on his own experience along with the sights and sounds of the event. 

Click play below to listen.

Dignity Dedicated Near Chamberlain

Sep 18, 2016
Charles Michael Ray

South Dakota has a new monumental piece of art.  A fifty foot tall stainless steel sculpture now stands on the Missouri River bluffs near Chamberlain. A dedication celebration, held this past weekend, included a long list of dignitaries.

“Dignity” as it’s called depicts a Lakota woman wrapping a star quilt around her shoulders.   Norm and Eunabel  McKie of Rapid City donated one million dollars to make the project reality.   Sculptor Dale Lamphere is among those who spoke at the dedication celebration.

IHS To Close Sioux San ER September 20th

Sep 13, 2016
wrong picture
Lee Strubinger / SDPB

Indian Health Service officials are temporally closing the emergency room at Sioux San Hospital in Rapid City.  Officials say the closure is meant to improve overall care and begin renovations on the facility. Officials do not have an immediate date for when ER services might be resumed.  

The VA Black Hills Health Care System plans to end service to veterans in the Eagle Butte, Isabel and Faith areas by October. We spoke to the VA’s administrator as well as a Lakota veterans’ representative on the Cheyenne River Sioux Reservation and files this report.

It’s a 290 mile roundtrip from Eagle Butte to the Black Hills VA health care facility in Sturgis.

Charles Michael Ray

The Cornerstone Rescue mission is running overcapacity in Rapid City.   The mission provides about 400 meals per day and nightly shelter for about 150 homeless people in western South Dakota.  

Cornerstone officials say on some nights as many as 30 women and children are sleeping on the floor in the basement because the mission has no more room to house those in need.

SDPB’s Charles Michael Ray sat down with the Cornerstone Rescue Mission Executive Director  Lysa Allison and the mission’s board president Chad Carpenter.

Lakota-Owned Business Opens In Oelrichs

Aug 29, 2016
Photo by Jim Kent

 A Lakota man and his wife have assumed ownership of a business at a Pine Ridge Reservation border town. This might not sound like a major news story...but we visited the couple to discuss what’s becoming a growing trend around Pine Ridge…Lakota owned and operated enterprises.

Just off Highway 385 and 13 miles west of the Pine Ridge Reservation sits the town of Oelrichs. Population 126.

Courtesy Cannupa Hanska Luger

Two Lakota people are among this year’s recipients of the Native Arts and Cultures Foundation’s National Artist Fellowships. Sixteen artists in 5 categories are selected for the honor each year from the Alaska Native, American Indian and Native Hawaiian communities.

The Native Arts and Cultures Foundation supports the vision, creativity and innovation of Native artists in a variety of disciplines.

Amy Sisk

Native Americans from Wyoming, Colorado and as far as Oklahoma are pulling up by the busload to protest an oil pipeline in rural North Dakota.

Construction began near the Missouri River section of the 1,200-mile Dakota Access Pipeline last week. This week, more than 1,500 protesters arrived at the border of the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation.

“For two, years we’ve been holding them off, waiting for you to come. Now you’re here with us,” Jon Eagle Sr. told a cheering crowd at a protesters’ camp near the construction site.

Charles Michael Ray

Erik Bringswhite is a former Rapid City gang member who now works to stop meth use in South Dakota.  Bringswhite uses Lakota culture and spirituality to reach out to those who are struggling with addiction.

Bringswhite is a meth prevention coordinator with the Oglala Sioux Tribe.   He stopped by the Rapid City studio for an interview with a group of individuals working to curb the use of the addictive drug in the state.

http://www.artscouncil.sd.gov/aisc/litdiggs.aspx

The Lakota language has no poetry tradition. Lawrence Diggs is a scholar working to encourage Lakota language learners to create poems. Diggs joins Dakota Midday host Lori Walsh to talk about a week-long workshop at Sitting Bull College through the Lakota Language Institute.

Rapid City Chamber of Commerce & Community Conversations

The Rapid City Chamber of Commerce met Thursday morning to reveal a new initiative to promote racial equality in the workplace. It’s a pledge, called “In the Spirit of Mitákuye Oyás’in or We Are All Related” and comes after a yearlong process of identifying social issues in the city.

The pledge to end discrimination in Rapid City businesses came after the Chamber was approached by Community Conversations, an organization formed to address racial inequality.

As we approach the anniversary of the Battle of Greasy Grass/Battle of Little Bighorn scholar Donovin Sprague will discuss the battle from the perspective of a Lakota and Cheyenne family during a Learning Forum at the Journey Museum at 2:00 p.m. on Saturday, June 25th.

He joins Dakota Midday to talk about new scholarship that adds to the cultural understanding of what happened 140 years ago this week.

Sprague is an adjunct instructor in American Indian Studies at Black Hills State University. He is a tribal archivist, historic tour guide, and musician.

Lakota Language Program Looks To Keep Customs Alive

Jun 20, 2016
Lakota Language Consortium

The Lakota Summer Institute is a three week long program that hopes to build lifelong learners of the Lakota language. Held at Sitting Bull College in Fort Yates, North Dakota, officials from the institute say they want to give people a reason to learn a language that so few speak. 

Craig Howe of CAIRNS (Center for American Indian Research and Native Studies) joins Dakota Midday to talk about the Lakota Lands and Identities traveling classroom. The program explores a sampling of the traditional homelands of the Lakota people. The seminar brings learners to various prominent Lakota places within the boundaries of the 1868 For Laramie Treaty.

Jodi Archambault Gillette, former special assistant to President Barrack Obama for Native American Affairs, will receive an Honorary Doctorate from Black Hills State University on Saturday, May 7 at 10 a.m. during commencement ceremonies.

Gillette will also present a special lecture Friday, May 6 at 1 p.m. at BHSU. She joins Dakota Midday for a conversation about her lifelong advocacy for families and children, how the traditions of her youth continue to impact her work, and the importance of increasing visibility of Native American issues at the highest level of government.

Sarah Deer is a MacArthur Fellow, a legal scholar, and an author. She discusses her 2015 book "The Beginning and End of Rape: Confronting Sexual Violence in Native America" with Dakota Midday host Lori Walsh.

Dakota Digest for March 25, 2016

Mar 25, 2016
SDPB

On this week's edition of Dakota Digest, more information surfaces regarding the GEAR UP program. Also, there's now a news website available in the Lakota Language, and SDPB's Victoria Wicks took a trip up Harney Peak with "indigenous people."

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