John Miller

Adria Botella

In The Moment ... September 7, 2018 Show 417 Hour 1

"The Plains Political Tradition: Essays on South Dakota Political Culture" is the third in a series of essay collections that explores the major influences in the political culture of South Dakota.

The books look at topics such as rural economic development and understanding the state's political culture through the lens of the 1994 election of Governor Bill Janklow.

The collection is edited by Jon Lauck, John Miller, and Paula Nelson.

In The Moment ... August 6, 2018 Show 394 Hour 2

Democracies are not guaranteed to last forever. They are inherently fragile.

John Miller says that within a democratic society, people naturally disagree. What is important is our ability and willingness to negotiate those disagreements. And that is not as easy as it sounds. 

John Miller wrote "Democracy and the Informed Citizen: A South Dakota Perspective" based on that premise. 

Today he joined In The Moment with a little insight on his book. 

John Miller taught US history at South Dakota State University for 29 years. He is currently working on a political biography of George McGovern.

He joins Dakota Midday to discuss the Dakota Conference on Northern Plains History, Literature, Art and Archaeology at the Center for Western Studies in Sioux Falls. The theme for this year’s conference is “World War II Comes to the Northern Plains.”

Jon Lauck is chair of the Midwestern History Association. He is an author, a professor, and a lawyer. He has written several books, including "The Lost Region: Toward a Revival of Midwestern History."

John Miller is an author, historian, and professor. His "Small-Town Dreams: Stories of Midwestern Boys Who Shaped America" was released in 2014.

Lauck and Miller join Dakota Midday host Lori Walsh to discuss the importance of Midwestern studies ... why it matters and what needs to be done to create a thriving field of study that values the places we call home.

Cara Hetland SDPB

The Midwestern History Association was created this past fall to advance the study of the American Midwest and to give the region a stronger voice in the American historical profession. The organization's first president, Jon Lauck, says he thinks the association will be the inspiration for many future books, articles and dissertations focusing on the Midwest. Lauck is author of  The Lost Region: Toward a Revival of Midwestern History.