healthcare overhaul

Kealey Bultena / SDPB

Before the Affordable Care Act went into effect, South Dakota had as many as 17 individual health insurance providers. Now the state has two, Avera and Sanford.

Conservative state leaders say that happened because Obamacare forced insurers out of the marketplace.

However, the CEO of Avera Health Plans says the state’s market isn’t big enough to host 17 individual health providers.

“Before the Affordable Care Act, South Dakota had 17 insurers offering individual health insurance policies. Now we just have two,” says Governor Dennis Daugaard.

Kealey Bultena / SDPB

As healthcare reform talks are stymied in Congress, there’s still a lot of uncertainty about future funding from a controversial portion of the Affordable Care Act.

President Donald Trump says he may pull Cost Sharing Reduction payments. But one of South Dakota’s Senators says that might not be a good idea right now.

Cost Sharing Reduction payments, or CSR’s, are federal monies that help low income Americans afford healthcare on the exchange marketplace.

Kealey Bultena / SDPB

South Dakota’s congressional delegation is still intent to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act, or Obamacare.

Healthcare leaders in South Dakota say congressional legislative proposals could hurt the state.

Barb Storbeck helps people enroll for health insurance through the exchange set up by the Affordable Care Act.

She says many of her clients were getting health insurance for the first time.

Rounds for Senate

South Dakota US Senator Mike Rounds says the revised Senate healthcare overhaul bill is a step in the right direction.
 
The revision was released Thursday morning.
 
Rounds says the bill should lower the cost of healthcare while continuing to provide access for those who need it.
 

SDAHO 'Deeply Concerned' With Healthcare Overhaul

Jun 29, 2017
Mike Rounds

US Senator Mike Rounds says Congress hopes to have a healthcare overhaul bill signed by the president in September.
 
Rounds says that’s enough time to establish new rules as the insurance marketplace opens in January.
 
But an association of South Dakota hospitals wants the state’s delegation to vote against the bill.