Health

Health Issues

It's estimated that half of all Americans take a health supplement every day, from fish oil to multivitamins to diet pills.  The booming $30 billion plus vitamins and supplements industry says these products can make consumers healthier, but "Supplements and Safety," a new FRONTLINE investigation with the New York Times and the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, raises troubling questions.  Director/producer Neil Docherty discussed the episode which premieres Tuesday night (1/19) at 9:00 p.m.

Vascular surgeon and research scientist Dr. Patrick Kelly is working to develop a next-generation medical device that can save patients thousands of dollars and prevent repeat surgeries. He joins Dakota Midday host Lori Walsh to talk about his partnership with Gopinath Mani, Ph.D., and the culture of innovation in South Dakota.

Jill Johnson joins us to discuss how laughter can calm, restore, and heal. Yoga instructor Johnson and her husband own Joyful Living Therapy in Sioux Falls and teach others how to laugh with abandon and intention.

Heroin Overdoses: Hype Or Actual Pending SD Epidemic?

Dec 17, 2015
Centers for Disease Control

The Centers for Disease Control describe heroin related deaths as an epidemic in the United States, and some officials have raised concerns South Dakota is about to see a spike in heroin and prescription opioid overdoses.

But, data from the State Department of Health shows that over the last decade heroin overdoses are almost non-existent in South Dakota.   

 And while prescription drug abuse is a concern the numbers of opioid overdose deaths are smaller than other drugs like meth or alcohol.

Courtesy The Center for Mind-Body Medicine

As parents, teachers, school administrators and tribal officials continue to seek solutions to the youth suicide epidemic that’s plagued the Pine Ridge Reservation for years, health organizations from off the reservation are also offering their help.

SDPB’s Jim Kent visited with representatives of The Center for Mind-Body Medicine and workers at the Pine Ridge Boarding School to discuss how the suicide issue has impacted students and “supervisors” and what’s being done to address the problem.

If you’re feeling exhausted, depleted, and burned out, you might have something in common with your doctor. Forty six percent of all physicians now report experiencing burnout. That’s a 16 percent increase in the past two years. 

Jill Kruse, DO,  is the medical director for Avera’s LIGHT program, a well-being initiative for healthcare providers. She talks about avoiding and healing from burnout with tips gleaned from the struggles and successes of exhausted doctors.

Dakota Midday: Treating Aortic Aneurysms

Nov 19, 2015
South Dakota State University

Dr. Stephen Gent, Associate Professor in the Mechanical Engineering Department at South Dakota State University in Brookings, is part of a Sanford research team that has developed a better stent for treating aortic aneurysms.  Gent used computational fluid dynamics modeling to model blood flow through the new and improved stent.  Gent visited with Dakota Midday guest host Jackelyn Severin.

Steven F. Powell, MD is a medical oncologist and clinician scientist at Sanford Health, based in Sioux Falls, SD. Dr. Powell is also an assistant professor in Internal Medicine at the University Of South Dakota Sanford School Of Medicine. He serves as a sub-investigator for Sanford Health’s National Cancer Institute Community Oncology Research Program (NCORP). In addition to this, he serves as a principal investigator for several industry-sponsored and investigator-initiated studies. Dr.

Sue Johannsen of the South Dakota Diabetes Coalition joins Dakota Midday.  November is Diabetes Awareness Month.  Johannsen discusses Type 1 & Type 2 diabetes, diabetes prevention, diabetes control and recent research.

Jill Weimer, Ph.D. recently was awarded $440,000 to support her research of a rare neurodegenerative disease called Batten Disease.  Weimer's lab is among only a few in the world studying the condition which primarily affects children that can cause seizures, blindness, motor and cognitive decline and premature death. Genetic mutations disrupt the ability of cells to dispose of waste and causes abnormal accumulation of proteins and lipids within nerve cells.  The grant funding will allow Weimer to screen several different treatment methods, which can include gene therapy or stem cells.

American Heart Association

Wednesday is National Eating Healthy Day. The American Heart Association wants to encourage families to focus on eating healthy for a day to build good habits.

With one in eight U.S. women diagnosed with breast cancer in her lifetime, the odds are high that at some point most students’ lives are impacted by this disease. During Breast Cancer Awareness Month, Texas Instruments (TI) and Sanford Health have introduced a new “STEM Behind Health” activity called “Breast Cancer: When Good DNA Goes Bad” to help students better understand breast cancer and explore the math and science concepts that are helping to find a cure.

 In the activity, Dr.

Dr. Reiland's focus in breast cancer and breast health allows her to research and recommend the most advanced and appropriate treatment methods for patients. She has a special interest in breast oncoplasty and Electron-based IntraOperative Radiation Therapy (IORT).

www.southdakotasafetycouncil.org

Safety is paramount in discussions this week ranging from drug use to defense against an active shooter.  The discussions are part of the South Dakota Safety Council's annual conference to spotlight health and safety.  SDPB news producer Kealey Bultena sat down with Don Marose, a Minnesota State Trooper.  Marose, who hosts trainings for schools and businesses on traffic safety, talked about distracted driving.

Bultena also visited with Chad Sheehan who owns a workplace violence consulting business.  His company has trained more than 13,000 people in the last two years.

Dakota Midday: Aging Happy, Healthy And Wise

Oct 7, 2015

Seniors are often confronted with issues and legal questions which can be complicated and confusing.  To help answer questions in person, SDSU Extension invites senior South Dakotans to attend the October 8 "Healthy, Happy and Wise" annual conference in Salem.  With approximately 14.3% of South Dakotans age 65 and older, the state has the seventh oldest population of any state in the nation.  SDSU Extension Food Safety Field Specialist Lavonne Meyer is coordinating Thursday's event.  She joined guest host Joe Tlustos on Dakota Midday.

The department of health wants to get more people walking.  Mobridge and Keystone are the latest towns receiving grants to access the walkability of sidewalks and streets.

Linda Ahrendt is the chronic disease director at the department of health.  She says exercising just 22 minutes daily significantly reduces the risk of heart disease and diabetes.

Dakota Midday: Sanford Imagenetics

Sep 22, 2015
Sanford Health

Sanford is building a state-of-the-art facility to integrate genomic medicine with innovative primary care.  As medicine incorporates tailored plans based on genes, Dr. Gene Hoyme, chief of genetics and genomic medicine at Sanford Health, says additional training is necessary to shape the next wave of medicine.  He joined guest host Kealey Bultena to detail new programs at area schools that will prepare students for this element of healing.  He also talked about Sanford's new residency focusing on medical genetics.

www.orbera.com

Dr. Brad Thaemert joins Dakota Midday to discuss a new weight loss procedure being offered in South Dakota. Avera McKennan Hospital & University Health Center is the exclusive site in South Dakota to offer a revolutionary weight-loss procedure that’s non-surgical and incision-free. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has recently approved the ORBERA™ Intragastric Balloon by Apollo Endoscopy, Inc. This new minimally-invasive weight-loss procedure will be performed by board-certified surgeons, Brad Thaemert, MD, and David Strand, MD.

Lori Oster, Program Coordinator for the Better Choices Better Health Program and Megan Olesen, Program Associate for the Better Choices Better Health Program.  Better Choices Better Health is a chronic disease self-management program developed at Stanford University in the 1990’s. 

In 1960 Dr. Frances Oldham Kelsey was the new medical officer at the Food and Drug Administration when she was assigned the review of a new drug application for thalidomide. The drug was already being sold to pregnant women in Europe and other countries as an anti-nausea drug to treat morning sickness. But Dr. Kelsey refused to approve the application without adequate evidence that the drug was safe. By late 1961 scientists had discovered that thalidomide was causing crippling birth defects in thousands of babies.

Grant Promotes Physical Activity at Work

Aug 2, 2015

South Dakota businesses who want to give their employees a chance to be physically active throughout the day can apply for a Steps to Wellness Grant. Funded by the Department of Health, the grant is awarded to 10 businesses across the state. Work sites then receive training to create strategies to promote physical activity in the workplace. 

The Helpline Center in Sioux Falls is leading a mental health first aid training. The 8-hour long session teaches people to look for the signs and symptoms of a mental health crisis and how to help.

Mental health first aid is giving help to someone after noticing signs of illness or distress. Lori Montis is the Suicide and Crisis Support Director at the Helpline Center. She says the training teaches anyone to recognize symptoms and respond.

With school out, children who rely on school lunches for food may be looking for a healthy meal. This summer the USDA is funding a toll-free hotline for kids and adults to call for information about free meal sites.

As part of the USDA’s Summer Foods Program, any child from across the country can call the nation toll-free hunger hotline. Based on a zip code, callers are then directed to the nearest food site where meals are provided by the USDA. Program Manager of the National Hunger Hotline Gina Bonilla says the meals are free to all kids with no enrollment requirements.

CDC/Jim Gathany

The state health department is reporting the first West Nile virus detection case of the season. It was detected in a mosquito pool in Meade County last week.

Since its first human West Nile virus case in 2002, South Dakota has reported 2,168 human cases and nearly 700 hospitalizations with 32 deaths. In 2013 there were 149 human cases of West Nile with three deaths. Last year 57 cases were reported.

Karl Gehrke SDPB

Now that we’re well into the summer, people are spending more time out on the state’s lakes and rivers. South Dakota Game, Fish and Parks is encouraging boaters to be safe on the water and wear life jackets. According to the U.S. Coast Guard, 84 percent of people who drowned in boating fatalities were not wearing life jackets.

This Friday through Sunday is also Operation Dry Water’s national heightened awareness and enforcement weekend for boating under the influence.

South Dakota State Medical Association

The South Dakota State Medical Association has a new president. Tim Ridgway, MD of Brandon was elected during the organization's annual meeting May 29. Dr. Ridgway is dean of faculty affairs and associate professor of medicine at the University of South Dakota Sanford School of Medicine. He has an active gastroenterology practice and serves as director of endoscopy at the Veterans Administration Hospital in Sioux Falls.

Third Annual CRCAIH Summit

Jun 12, 2015
Sanford Health

Dr. Amy Elliott, director of the Center for Health Outcomes and Prevention at Sanford Research, visited about the Third Annual Collaborative Research Center for American Indian Health Summit.  In 2013, Sanford Research and its partners received a $13.5 million grant, the largest in its history, from the National Institutes of Health's National Institute on Minority Health and Disparitites to create CRCAIH.

Health disparity in the U.S. is a problem among certain population groups, such as South Dakota’s rural areas and Native American communities. To help bridge the health care gap, the Rise-Up program offers internships to young men and women from underserved areas who are interested in health care careers. The idea is that they will return and serve their home communities.

Andean Health and Development

On Saturday, Dr. Michael Heisler and some 30 bicyclists begin a trek taking them from Skykomish, Washington to Sioux Falls. The 1,500 mile, three week trip is a fundraiser for Andean Health and Development to support the completion of the Hesburgh Hospital in Santo Domingo, Ecuador. The mission is to raise $500,000 thousand dollars to help fully equip the hospital and support research and training.

Sanford Health

Customized cancer treatment is the future of cancer therapy, but analyzing the unique genetic make-up of individuals can take an enormous amount of time. It typically takes weeks for clinicians to analyze each genetic mutation, but IBM Watson Genomic Analytics in some cases can complete the process in just a few minutes and produce a report, including treatment recommendations. The ambitious goal is personalized medicine for cancer patients everywhere based on their unique genomic profile.

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