Culture

Charles Michael Ray / SDPB

Rolling Rez Arts, a bus that has a bank, business center and art classroom, is gearing up for a busy summer. The bus crisscrosses the Pine Ridge Reservation, stopping in each community. This week it made a stop in Rapid City.

 

Gus Yellow hair is an artist and also bus driver for Rolling Rez Arts. Today on the bus, he’s joined by his granddaughter.  

“My t'akója her Lakota name is (speaking Lakota), Growling Bear Woman, she carries the name of her grandmother, who has since passed on,” says Yellow Hair.

Dakota Midday: Kelly Lindquist, Art Space CEO

May 2, 2016
Art Space

A starving artist is sometimes seen as the norm.  Many great artists lived at least some of their lives struggling with poverty, think, Van Gogh or even Johnny Cash. 

But some argue that artists should not always go hungry, or homeless.     Kelly Lindquist is President and CEO of a Minneapolis based organization called Art Space.

The State Visual Arts Event In Sioux Falls

Mar 22, 2016
SDPB

The Denny Sanford PREMIER Center in Sioux Falls hosted thousands of people over the weekend for the state Class AA basketball tournament. But it wasn’t the only contest happening in the building.

The second annual Visual Arts competition includes hundreds of artwork pieces on display in the main concourse area of the center. Fans attending the games took in artwork from 307 individual entries representing forty schools at this year’s competition.

Jenifer Jones / SDPB

Lawmakers in Pierre support two programs aimed at Native American education. One measure seeks to help people who want to finish college courses so they can teach in Native American schools. The other sets up a pilot program to combine innovative cultural teachings with standard subjects.

Chynna Lockett / SDPB

A bill that requires students use school bathrooms that coincide with biological sex is not law. Governor Dennis Daugaard announced Tuesday he vetoed House Bill 1008 hours before the deadline to make a decision.

House Bill 1008 is the so-called transgender bathroom bill. Supporters say the measure protects privacy, because it keeps students of different biological sexes in separate bathrooms, locker rooms, and showers.

Community Conversations Celebrates 1st Anniversary

Feb 24, 2016
Charles Michael Ray

Rapid City’s Community Conversations group is hosting an Innovation Summit on Thursday.  The event marks the group’s one year anniversary. Chas Jewett, a group organizer, says the event celebrates the changes and relationships developed in Rapid City over the past year.

Native History Bill Fails, Opponents Say Issue Still Important

Feb 22, 2016

Legislation to require more teaching of tribal history in South Dakota schools failed its first committee hearing in the State Legislature.  
 
Some educators say an effort is already underway to increase the teaching of Lakota, Dakota, and Nakota culture in the state.  Those backing the bill say more needs to be done.

 

Jenifer Jones

A measure known as the transgender bathroom bill is on its way to the governor’s desk. House Bill 1008 survived the State Senate on Tuesday. Fifteen lawmakers in that chamber oppose the legislation, but 20 support it.

Supporters of the so-called transgender bathroom bill say it protects student privacy by securing restrooms for opposite biological sexes. The bill determines sex based on anatomy and birth certificates. State Senator Brock Greenfield supports the measure.

Jenifer Jones / SDPB

A measure that allows lawmakers to review the South Dakota High School Activities Association’s social policy is dead. Some legislators support House Bill 1111 as a means to regulate issues related to transgender students among other matters. The argument on the bill in committee centered on the whether the activities association qualifies as a state agency.

New BHFCU TV Commercial In Lakota

Jan 31, 2016

If you live in the Black Hills area you may have seen a recent commercial entirely in Lakota on TV.

It’s an advertisement for the Black Hills Federal Credit Union and it’s airing on every broadcast and cable TV network in the Hills area

Credit Union officials say they want to reach out to Lakota people in their own language.

Two Lakota versions of the BHFCU commercial are circulating, one with the Lakota female dialect and one with the male.  A third version of the commercial is in English.

Jenifer Jones

A state Senate panel is endorsing education plans that focus on supporting Native American students. One of those measures funds programs that focus on incorporating Indian culture and language into standard subjects. 


Giago Starts Non-Profit To Buy Wounded Knee Site

Jan 26, 2016

An Oglala Lakota newspaper publisher has started a campaign to buy 40 acres of private land near the Wounded Knee Massacre site.

The land is held by a non-native owner who is asking nearly $4-million for the property.   Those backing the plan to buy the land say it needs to be held by the Lakota people and used in a positive way.

Newspaper publisher Tim Giago says he wants to see a museum and arts and trade center built on the property once it’s acquired.

A bill outlining which students can use which bathrooms in South Dakota schools is past its first legislative hurdle. The House State Affairs committee Monday approved House Bill 1008. Supporters of the measure say it protects student privacy; opponents say the move harms students who are transgender.

Building Bridges Across The Racial Divide In Rapid City

Dec 21, 2015
Chynna Lockett

Rapid City has a history of tense race relations.   

Last year racial tension erupted after an incident in which Lakota students say they were doused with beer at a hockey game.   Those accused were found not guilty of any crimes.

But following the incident, a number of efforts began to build bridges and forge new cross cultural relationships in Rapid City.  One of those efforts is called Community Conversations.

Kealey Bultena / SDPB

A woman who survived the Boston Marathon bombing says people with disabilities deserve respect and opportunity. She is one speaker during this week’s Disabilities Rights Conference in Sioux Falls. The gathering is aimed at health workers, business leaders, educators and officials to raise awareness and remind people of their role in protecting the rights of people with disabilities.

Before April 15, 2013 Heather Abbott was a full-time human resources manager who specialized in affirmative action and equal employment opportunity.

Kealey Bultena / SDPB News

A visible member of the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe says work between Indians and the rest of the state is not done. While much of the country took Monday off for Columbus Day, South Dakotans celebrated Native American Day. Leaders made the decision to change the holiday years ago. One man says some people still don’t use the holiday’s proper name.

JR LaPlante spent nearly four years as South Dakota’s first Secretary of Tribal Relations. He says changes made in 1990 were not answers to Native-white relations, but starting points. He says issues still exist.

Ask This Old House

This Old House is a popular, long-running PBS television program following remodeling projects over a number of weeks. But because the program only works on one or two houses a year, a new program, Ask This Old House, was spun off in 2002 to help solve home improvement problems faced by viewers. Host Kevin O’Connor and experts answer everyday home improvement and repair questions along with more specialized questions.

JENIFER JONES

Nestled into a cornfield in northeast South Dakota, the Granary Rural Cultural Center is a place to celebrate the beauty of both art and nature. Here’s a look at what visitors will find when they take a trip to this arts oasis the middle of the countryside.
 

Dakota Midday: New Domes Installed At Corn Palace

Aug 4, 2015
Mitchell Corn Palace

The three new domes are up at the Mitchell Corn Palace. The new, onion-shaped domes were installed last Monday. The domes, along with new decorative turrets, are part of a $7.2 million renovation of the iconic South Dakota landmark.

Bob Glanzer grew up on a farm northeast of Huron with dreams of becoming a world champion bull rider, but fourth place in the regional high school rodeo was about as close as he got. Instead he became a teacher, and helped with the rodeo club at Wessington Springs High School. He later served as manager of the South Dakota State Fair in the late 1970s and was superintendent of the grandstand stage shows and events for two decades. During his first year as manager, he had to rush out and buy boots for country Johnny Cash minutes before the country music legend took the stage.

Red Cloud was the only American Indian leader to win a war against the United States Army. What's called Red Cloud's War was armed conflict over control of Powder River Country in present day Wyoming. Later he was committed to preserving his people’s traditions and culture as they were moved to reservations.

Over the course of their expedition, Lewis and Clark came into contact with nearly 50 Native American tribes. Some had never seen a white man before, while others spoke bits of English and wore hats and coats they received from Europeans.

Presentation College history professor Brad Tennant says that while the meetings between the Corps of Discovery expedition and the native populations were relatively peaceful and friendly, one of the most strained meetings occurred in present-day South Dakota when Lewis and Clark held council with the Teton Sioux, or Lakota.

US Attorney’s office / DOJ

The US Attorney’s office and the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe have come to a new agreement that aims to help inmates transition back into life outside prison.

The overall goal is to reduce crime and recidivism by helping newly released inmates integrate back into tribal communities.  

Troy Morley is the Tribal Liaison  for the US Attorney’s office in South Dakota.   He says currently the halfway houses used by former prisoners are outside the reservation.   Morley says this causes problems for those just released who want to visit home.    

RESPECT Celebrates The Art Of Motorcycle Culture

Jul 13, 2015
Dahl Arts Center

When you think of bikers roaring into the Black Hills for the 75th Sturgis Rally an art gallery might be the last place you’d think they’d visit. But, the Dahl Arts Center in Rapid City wants to change that notion. The Dahl has a special exhibit celebrating biker culture and the 75th Rally anniversary. 

The stereotypical biker is not someone you’d expect to find in an art gallery.

Photo by Jim Kent

The Chadron Public Library held its second annual Native American film festival this past weekend. The goal of the “Trading Stories: A Native American Film Festival” is to bring another perspective to the “Fur Trade Days Celebration” held each summer in the western Nebraska town. 

“Pow Wow Highway” was among the first films made by Native Americans about Native Americans that sought to break the stereotypes engrained in a century of Hollywood celluloid.

Photo by Jim Kent

As part of its second annual Native American film festival, the Chadron Public Library added traditional story tellers to its list of educational entertainment. 

Joyzelle Gingway Godfrey is Yankton Sioux and Ottawa. She started story telling in the Rapid City school system. The American Indian elder says she shares traditional stories as a way to educate people.

Thomas Pitz

All across the nation on Saturday, people will celebrate Independence Day with parades, band concerts and fireworks. It was on July 4, 1776 that the 13 American colonies declared that they were no longer a part of the British Empire, but instead a new country.

The principal author of the Declaration of Independence was Thomas Jefferson, who also served as the nation’s third president from 1801 and 1809. One of his major accomplishments in office was the Louisiana Purchase, a huge swath of territory including the future South Dakota.

South Dakota Dashboard

South Dakota had begun to narrow the education spending gap with neighboring states at the start of this decade, but state budget cuts in 2011 widened the difference and the gap has continued to grow in recent years. That’s according to an analysis of data by South Dakota Dashboard.

Patrick Dobson was a novice canoer when he launched his boat in Montana and began a journey down the Missouri River to Kansas City. A woman in Helena told him he was doomed. “That river’s gonna’ eat you,” she said. But Dobson had just finished a ten week walk to Montana from Kansas City and the Missouri was his way back home.

At the time of his journey in the summer of 1995, Dobson was tired of a dead-end job and feeling empty inside. His journey was a search for redemption and a way to help him reconnect with his life.

Reptile Gardens

When the United Nations was born in November of 1945, it didn’t have a home. Rapid City businessman Paul Bellamy thought the Black Hills would be the ideal place for world delegates to deliberate in peace and quiet. He even flew to war-torn London to make his case for making the Black Hills the Capitol of the World.

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