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Culture
2:48 pm
Mon September 15, 2014

South Dakota Chorale Director Awarded International Fellowship

Brian Schmidt and the South Dakota Chorale
Credit South Dakota Chorale

The artistic director and founder of the South Dakota Chorale is headed to Sweden next year. Brian Schmidt has been awarded a fellowship with the 2015 International Conductors Exchange Program. He was selected by the American Choral Directors Association as one of 14 U.S. conductors who will travel to Stockholm for the Scandinavian Choral Convention. Other details in the fellowship are still being finalized.

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Culture
2:49 pm
Thu September 11, 2014

Rare Historical Footage Featured in SDPB's 'Images of the Past'

Grade School Students at Spearfish Normal School - 1913
Credit Historical Footprints

A new project from South Dakota Public Broadcasting is making rare film and video from the state’s past available to the general public. "Images of the Past" features both well-known and unknown people, places and events in some of the earliest film shot in the state. Each Thursday more historical film footage, along with additional information and images, is posted online on SDPB's "Images of the Past" page.

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Culture
3:51 pm
Mon September 8, 2014

'A Day in South Dakota' Photo Contest Winners Named

Keith Hemmelman's prize-winning photograph from the State Capitol
Credit Keith Hemmelman

On August 19 nearly 200 people across the state took photographs from their lives and submitted them in SDPB's Day in South Dakota Landscapes Photo Contest. The contest was designed to help mark South Dakota’s 125th anniversary of statehood. Photographs were entered in four different categories: South Dakota, home, work, and connections. Kent Osborne, director of education and online services at South Dakota Public Broadcasting, joined Dakota Midday and announced the contest winners.

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Culture
2:15 pm
Mon September 8, 2014

Railroads in Dakota Territory

Milwaukee Road Depot in Mitchell, SD
Credit South Dakota State Historical Society

In South Dakota, as in most of the mid-western and western United States, railroads played a vital role in growth and settlement. Railroad companies even recruited homesteaders in Europe and mapped out towns for the new arrivals.

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Culture
1:36 pm
Thu September 4, 2014

Study Shows Economc Benefits of Historic Preservation

The former State School for the Blind in Gary, South Dakota is now home to Buffalo Ridge Resort
Credit Buffalo Ridge Resort

South Dakota has more than 6,700 buildings, structures, objects and sites on the National Register of Historic Places. Their historical and aesthetic value is easily understood, but is there any economic value to historic preservation? A recent study conducted by Rutgers University in collaboration with the State Historic Preservation Office of the South Dakota State Historical Society finds that it there are multi-million dollar economic and tax gains from historic preservation in the state. 

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Culture
1:56 pm
Wed September 3, 2014

Bringing Theodore Roosevelt to Life

Clay Jenkinson as Theodore Roosevelt

Theodore Roosevelt said that he never would have become President of the United States had it not been for the time he spent in North Dakota. He first came to the state in 1883 to hunt bison and later returned seeking solitude and time to heal following the death of both his mother and wife.

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Culture
3:01 pm
Tue September 2, 2014

140th Anniversary of Custer's Black Hills Expedition Observed

George Armstrong Custer (left center in light clothing) leads a military expedition into the Black Hills of Dakota Territory in 1874

In 1874, the U.S. Government sent General George Custer on an expedition into the Black Hills to find a location for a new army fort and investigate the area’s natural resources. The confirmation of gold drew thousands of whites into the Black Hills in violation of the 1868 Treaty of Fort Laramie which granted ownership of the Black Hills to the Lakota people.

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Culture
9:39 am
Fri August 29, 2014

The Wonderful World of Craft Beer

A glass of porter
Credit Karl Gehrke SDPB

This is probably the best time in American history to be a beer drinker. Over the past twenty-five years, some 2,000 craft breweries have opened up across the country with hundreds more currently in their planning stages. And they’re all making beers for a variety of tastes. There are Baltic porters and oatmeal stouts; dark ales and pale ales; English Barleywines and German Pilsners. There are sweet, malty beers and bitter, hoppy beers. There are beers brewed with fruit and beers brewed with spices. And beers for the winter and beers for the summer.

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Culture
2:49 pm
Wed August 20, 2014

Bush Fellow Preserves Lakota Peacemaking Traditions

Richard Iron Cloud
Credit Bush Foundation

If you’ve spent much time listening to the news lately, you’ve heard plenty of stories about conflict. That includes the unrest in the Middle East, Africa, and not to mention Ferguson, Missouri. Richard Iron Cloud is a peacemaker who has spent years working on the Pine Ridge Reservation to improve the tribal justice system and keep alive traditional Lakota ways of resolving conflict. He's a 2014 Bush Fellowship winner. The 100-thousand dollar grant is awarded to community leaders.

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Culture
8:06 am
Wed August 20, 2014

Farmers Markets Enrich Communities

Twin Brooks Farmers Market.

As South Dakota celebrates its 125th anniversary, SDPB is celebrating the people, places, and events that give our state its unique character. Agriculture has been a large part of South Dakota’s identity since before statehood, and today many farmers and gardeners are carrying on that legacy through farmer’s markets. As part of a continuing series, we have a look at why farmers markets are one of the important Landscapes of South Dakota.

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Culture
1:55 pm
Tue August 19, 2014

Augustana Professor Appears in PBS Archeology Reality Series

Teeth preserved in an ancient bison jawbone at the Badger Hole site in Oklahoma
Credit PBS

In the PBS science-reality series Time Team America, archeologists have 72 hours to uncover buried secrets using the latest technology, decades of expertise and their own smarts.

In tonight's episode airing on SDPB-TV, “The Bones of Badger Hills,”  Adrien Hannus assists a team digging at a site in western Oklahoma. Hannus is professor of anthropology and director of the Archeology Laboratory at Augustana College in Sioux Falls.

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Developing
11:42 am
Tue August 19, 2014

South Dakota Photographers Reflect on Their Craft

The first photograph ever taken.
Credit Joseph Nicephore Niepce

2014 brings the 175th anniversary of photography, being celebrated with “A Day in South Dakota”.  It’s an opportunity for people to take photos of what living in the state means to them, and send them along as a video archive of the day.  Collecting memories and recording history have obviously moved along as technology has improved photos and made them simple enough to take.  

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Culture
2:04 pm
Tue August 12, 2014

New Book Details Wounded Knee Massacre

December 29, 1890 was one of the darkest days of South Dakota and American history. In a clash with U.S. Army soldiers, some 200 innocent Lakota men, women and children were massacred at Wounded Knee Creek on the Pine Ridge Reservation. 124 years later, the horrific tragedy still haunts.

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Culture
1:35 pm
Thu August 7, 2014

The History of the Camaro

Calvin Tolle is the owner of CT Machine Shop in Brookings, is a Camaro enthusiast and joins us to discuss the history and popularity of the iconic Chevrolet model.  Tolle is working to open a Camaro museum in Brookings which would be the only museum of its kind.   

Also a conversation with Kent Osborne about the Landscapes of South Dakota Photo Project.

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Culture
3:06 pm
Wed August 6, 2014

Author Tells Stories of Black Hills with Historic Photos

Photo of Sitting Bull by Orlando Scott (c. 1881) featured in "The Black Hills: A History in Photographs" by John English

The growth of modern photography coincided with the settlement of the American frontier. Historical photographs provide a fascinating and sometimes haunting view of the Old West.

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Culture
2:02 pm
Wed August 6, 2014

South Dakota is 45th State for 'National Anthem Girl'

Janine Stange performing the National Anthem prior to a Cincinnati Reds baseball game
Credit Janine Stange

Two years ago Janine Stange set out on a mission to perform "The Star Spangled Banner" in every state. The Long Island native known as the National Anthem Girl is now in the home stretch with just six states left to go.

On Thursday she'll cross South Dakota off the map when she sings at the American Legion Division II Central Plain Regional Baseball Tournament in Milbank. As she has at other events, Stange will also invite people to sign thank you messages for military members and veterans.

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Culture
3:11 pm
Tue August 5, 2014

Racing in Sturgis on a 1923 Harley-Davidson

Brittney Olsen and her 1923 Harley-Davidson J Model board track racer
Credit 20th Century Racing

Brittney Olsen has always had a passion for racing. She remembers when her father took her to Wild Water West in Sioux Falls around the age of five to drive kid's go-carts. "I would do anything possible to get in first place," she says. "I would cut people off and do all these strange maneuvers just to get around them. A lot of my father's friends said, ‘I think you’ve got a racer on your hands.’"

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Culture
3:27 pm
Tue July 29, 2014

South Dakota Mayors Pick Top Town Attractions

Bowdle, SD water tower

For South Dakota Magazine's  July/August cover story, “Mayoral Likes,” the publication's staff spoke with mayors across the state from Aberdeen to Winner to find one thing in each community that might surprise or entertain travelers and readers.

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Culture
2:09 pm
Thu July 24, 2014

Stories of Redfield

Redfield's Chicago and Northwestern Railroad Depot was originally dedicated on October 23, 1914. It's now home to a museum and visitors center.
Credit City of Redfield

As part of SDPB's Landscapes of South Dakota series, Thursday's Dakota Midday broadcast live from the historic Chicago and Northwestern Railroad Depot in Redfield, South Dakota.

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Culture
4:20 pm
Tue July 22, 2014

Yankton and the Missouri River

Looking down river from Randall Creek Recreation Area.
Credit NPS photo by Linda Gordon Rokosz

Throughout its 157 year history, life in Yankton has centered around the Missouri River. Steamboat traffic on the river helped the town grow after its founding in 1857. But both Yankton and the river have changed over the years, most dramatically with the construction of dams on the Missouri, including the Gavin’s Point Dam west of town. The dams brought an end to navigation, but controlled flooding, generated electricity and created new recreational opportunities, with visitors camping, boating, swimming and fishing at Lewis and Clark Lake.

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Culture
2:02 pm
Tue July 22, 2014

Yankton: Capital of Dakota Territory

Dakota Territory coat of arms, 1876

Yankton became the capital of Dakota Territory in 1861, when the town was only two years old. The designation brought new settlers and businesses and the river town quickly expanded. The original capitol building was two stories, with territory offices on the bottom floor and territorial legislators on the second. In 1883, Yankton lost the territorial capital to Bismarck. And six years later when South Dakota became a state, Yankton tried to become the state’s capital, but lost to Pierre.

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Culture
1:53 pm
Tue July 22, 2014

WNAX: Regional Voice for 92 Years

WNAX transmitter building, 1936

Since 1922, Yankton's WNAX radio has broadcast throughout the upper Great Plains with a signal that can reach as far south as Kansas City and as far north as Fargo. During the station’s early days, WNAX was an important connection to the outside world for isolated farm and ranch families throughout the region.

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Culture
3:02 pm
Thu July 17, 2014

The Enduring Legend of Al Capone

Al Capone's Florida mugshot
Credit John Binder

More than eighty years after the peak of his power, the legend of mobster Al Capone endures. His name still evokes images of pin-stripe suits and white fedoras.

A new PBS program airing Tuesday on SDPB-TV, Al Capone: Icon, follows the gangster's rise from a two-bit hustler to the king of Chicago’s underworld and examines why he continues to fascinate so many Americans.

Bill Margol is senior director of programming and development at PBS and joined Dakota Midday to discuss the program.

  

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Culture
2:46 pm
Tue July 15, 2014

The Gentlemen Bootleggers of Templeton, Iowa

The Prohibition Era is filled with stories of bootleggers who defied the law to produce liquor for thirsty Americans. In his new book, Gentlemen Bootleggers: The True Story of Templeton Rye, Prohibition and a Small Town in Cahoots, Bryce T. Bauer brings to life the tale of Templeton, Iowa with its townspeople peacefully cooperating in the production of a special rye whiskey known for its quality and safety.

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Culture
2:42 pm
Wed July 9, 2014

Calvin Coolidge's Black Hills Summer Vacation

U.S. President Calvin Coolidge is on horseback to attend the dedication ceremony of the Mount Rushmore Memorial in South Dakota, Aug. 15, 1927.

A plaque commemorating President Calvin Coolidge's use of the old Rapid City High School as his executive office has been dedicated by Historic Rapid City. The plaque features photos of Coolidge and his wife, Grace, arriving in Rapid City by train and Coolidge on the steps of the school, which has since been torn down. It was from those steps that Coolidge announced that he chose not to run for re-election.

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Culture
3:07 pm
Mon July 7, 2014

The Early Basketball Heroes of Fort Shaw Indian School

Credit University of Oklahoma Press

Some of the first basketball players to gain national attention for new sport at the turn of the 20th century were young women from an isolated government American Indian boarding school in Montana. They dominated teams from around the region and went on to be declared World Champions at the 1904 St. Louis World’s Fair. But their triumphs were forgotten until a pair of women’s history scholars found a photo of the Fort Shaw Indian School team and wanted to know more about the young women.

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Culture - Spearfish - Cowboy
1:28 pm
Thu July 3, 2014

Spearfish Museum Celebrates National Cowboy Day

Branding cattle on the Great Western Cattle Trail.
Credit Courtesy High Plains Western Heritage Center

As citizens across the country celebrate our nation’s independence tomorrow, the High Plains Western Heritage Center is also putting time aside to recognize the American Cowboy. We visited the Spearfish museum to learn what it was like to raise cattle for a living and to discuss efforts by a 9-state coalition to mark the historic trail that brought cattle north from Texas to South Dakota and beyond.

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Culture
2:55 pm
Wed July 2, 2014

Lincoln's Bishop

In August and September of 1862, violence erupted in southwest Minnesota in what is often referred to as the U.S-Dakota War. The deadly attacks by the Dakotas against white settlers exploded out of frustration and anger over starvation and broken promises. In the aftermath of the conflict an Army court sentenced 303 Dakota men to death, 38 of whom were executed.

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Culture
3:34 pm
Mon June 30, 2014

Fourth of July Safety

The legal sale of fireworks in South Dakota continues through Sunday. Officials are reminding people to be safe and use common sense as they celebrate the Fourth of July.

Pennington County Fire Administrator Denny Gorton urges residents to follow the instructions on the fireworks packages, plan for the unexpected and always have a bucket of water or garden hose ready. Gorton told Dakota Midday that his office’s main concerns over the next week as people shoot off fireworks is public safety and fire prevention.

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Culture
3:05 pm
Thu June 26, 2014

An Englishman in Yankton

Meridian Bridge over the Missouri River in Yankton, SD
Credit Jesse Kagarise

When English travel writer Fraser Harrison first visited Yankton in May 2011, he wasn’t impressed. His guide book promised a "gem-like historic town," but he was instead disappointed by what seemed to be a rather moribund community.

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