Attorney General Marty Jackley

In The Moment ... January 10, 2017 Show 253 Hour 1

The 2018 South Dakota Legislative Session is underway in Pierre. South Dakota Attorney General Marty Jackley joins us for a preview of his legislative agenda.

SD Unified Judicial System

The South Dakota Supreme Court has issued an opinion that both parties knew was inevitable. Justices have ruled that a state law requiring out-of-state vendors to collect sales taxes from their South Dakota customers is unconstitutional.

As SDPB reported in late August, state authorities knew the bill was unconstitutional but passed it into law anyway and then tried to enforce it.

SDPB's Victoria Wicks has the latest development on this ongoing story.

Kealey Bultena / SDPB

A South Dakota circuit court judge is denying a request by drug companies for the Attorney General to rewrite a ballot measure question.

The ballot question caps the amount state agencies can pay for prescription drugs.

The ballot measure question requires state agencies to pay the same, or lower prices for prescription drugs as the US Department of Veterans Affairs pays…

Some prescription drug entities took issue with Attorney General Marty Jackley’s explanation for voters.

SDPB

South Dakota Attorney General Marty Jackley says his office is joining twenty other attorneys general in asking the US Supreme court to hear and clarify the Establishment Clause.
 
That clause prohibits the government from establishing an official religion.
 
The case originated in New Mexico, where a town established a monument of Moses’ Ten Commandments on city property.
 

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In The Moment ... May 24, 2017 Show 100 Hour 2

South Dakota Attorney General Marty Jackley joins us for an update on Project Stand Up. It's a statewide coordinate campaign that allows for anonymous tips regarding drug crime. We’ll discuss early results from the program as well as Jackley’s thoughts on messages from U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions.

Dakota Political Junkies Dana Ferguson and Roger Whittle join In the Moment. From recent updates on GEAR UP to the current trial in Flandreau, the Junkies offer updates and analysis on the week’s top political headlines.

SDPB

The group backing two marijuana related ballot questions says they’re concerned about the language of the Attorney General’s explanations.
 
The Attorney General is tasked with crafting ‘an objective, clear, and simple summary’ of a proposed amendment.
 
A lawyer assisting the group New Approach South Dakota in passing two ballot questions legalizing recreational and medicinal marijuana says the language in Attorney General Marty Jackley’s summary is unnecessarily strong.
 

The South Dakota Attorney General is releasing two explanations for proposed initiated measure ballot questions aimed at legalizing recreational and medicinal marijuana.
 
These statements appear on petitions that are circulated by sponsors of the measures.
 
A spokesperson for New Approach South Dakota says petitions could start circulating as early as next week.
 

According to 2016 crime statistics from the South Dakota attorney general’s office, drug offenses are up and violent crime is down. South Dakota law enforcement agencies made a total of 42,000 arrests last year.
 
Attorney General Marty Jackley says despite the number of arrests, South Dakota remains a safe state to live in...

“When you look at some of the violent crimes that most people are worried about, murder and sex offenses, we’re down over 20 percent.”

Gov. Dennis Daugaard signed the first bill of the 2017 Legislative Session into law. House Bill 1006 clarifies the timeline for posting notices for public meetings.

Amazon is now collecting sales tax from South Dakota residents. The Seattle-based company had been slow to collect sales taxes in small and sparsely populated states where it doesn't have a facility. Officials say the agreement with Amazon will help the state meet revenue goals.

The State Senate will revisit a bill that failed to become law a year ago.  Senate Bill 24 re-classifies Vehicular Homicide as a violent crime. The Rapid City Chamber will change the question and answer format of its Legislative crackerbarrel sessions. More than 14 million people traveled to South Dakota for recreational purposes in 2016.

Legislative leaders are already split over how to budget new money coming to South Dakota. Other stories featured in this podcast include: Governor Dennis Daugaard says he wants the legislature to update the state's wiretapping laws. Chief Justice David Gilbertson calls the rising rates of addiction in South Dakota a new wave of evil.

SD Electors Say They Will Vote For Trump

Dec 16, 2016

The South Dakota Electoral College voters say they won’t need intelligence briefings before casting their vote for President-elect Donald Trump.

A spokesperson for Governor Dennis Daugaard and Lieutenant Governor Matt Michels says they believe it’s their job to reflect the will of South Dakota voters.

A spokesperson for Attorney General Marty Jackley says he has no plans of receiving intelligence briefings into alleged Russian meddling with the American election system.

President-elect Donald Trump won the state of South Dakota 61 percent of the vote.
 

Attorney General's Office

The Attorney General is issuing a 10-page opinion to clear up some questions created by Amendment S, or Marsy's Law.

Marty Jackley has appointed almost 30 professionals to serve on a committee to come up with answers.

On Monday, Dec. 5, Jackley held a conference call with the committee to discuss a draft opinion he and his staff created.

Jackley says more work remains to be done, and subcommittees can add insights.

Agencies Find Money For Victims' Rights

Nov 16, 2016
courtesy photo

Now that crime victims' rights have been expanded in South Dakota, agencies are finding money to cover additional services. Voters approved Amendment S, known as Marsy's Law, last week, and it takes effect this week.

Attorney General Marty Jackley has been working on systems to notify victims of their rights. But he tells SDPB's Victoria Wicks that counties might have to absorb other costs.

Goat Island Finds A Home

Oct 13, 2016
National Park Service

Goat Island has a new caretaker following a twenty year dispute.

Ownership of the 500-acre strip of land on the Missouri River between South Dakota and Nebraska has been contested since 1999.

The National Park Service will now manage the island.

Officials say now that the Goat Island dispute is settled, the National Park Service can manage the area in a way that boosts recreational opportunities.

A week long investigation during the Sturgis Rally has led to several arrests for sex crimes.

Eight men are facing felony charges for attempting to solicit a minor over the internet. Local and state investigators worked together during the seven day investigation.

 Attorney General Marty Jackley says the arrests send a message that South Dakota is not the place for predators seeking to solicit minors.

Victoria Wicks

A program to automatically provide information to crime victims in South Dakota is coming online now in some areas. And within a year, information should be available to victims in all counties across the state. The Statewide Automated Victim Information and Notification System, or SAVIN, is designed to enforce existing victims' rights under state law.

Notification Program Improves Victims’ Rights

Aug 16, 2016
Erin Mairose

Crime victims in South Dakota will soon have access to real time information about the status of offenders.

The program lets victims know when offenders get out of jail or break probation. 

The automated victim information system, known as SAVIN, gives crime victims better access to information about offenders. When the status of an offender changes, crime victims can chose to receive a call, text, or email.

Marty Jackley

State Attorney Marty Jackley joins Dakota Midday to continue Tuesday's discussion on law enforcement.

He discusses the protocols and investigations that go into South Dakota officer-involved shootings. He also talks about citizens' views of law enforcement and how these event effect it.

Dakota Midday: Policy Insight from Marty Jackley

May 24, 2016

South Dakota Attorney General Marty Jackley is leading a national attorneys general delegation to Israel this week, and he’s bringing a little South Dakota policy insight with him. Attorney General Jackley talks with Dakota Midday host Lori Walsh about what international collaboration can offer the state of South Dakota, about officer-involved shootings in the state, and about efforts to challenge President Obama on his rejection of the Keystone XL pipeline. 

Dana Ferguson is a watchdog state government and political reporter with Argus Leader Media. Kevin Woster is a reporter for KELO-TV, Rapid City Bureau.

Together they represent this week's Dakota Political Junkies and talk with Midday host Lori Walsh about the week's political headlines.

Today's topics include accusations about Flandreu's tribal marijuana crop and memories of the plane crash that shook the state 23 years ago this week.

Roger Whittle is managing editor with the Watertown Public Opinion. Jonathan Ellis is a reporter and columnist with the Sioux Falls Argus Leader. They sit down with Dakota Midday host Lori Walsh to discuss updates in state politics, from the Attorney General's press conference in Platte, to why March basketball can be more exciting than

March primary season, the Junkies provide insight and perspective into issues of the day.

Attorney General Marty Jackley has returned from the winter meeting of the National Association of Attorneys General. He joins Dakota Midday host Lori Walsh to discuss updates in state legislation, including HB1008 and the vehicular homicide statute. AG Jackley also highlights the significance of US Attorney General Loretta Lynch's address to the state Attorneys General.

Photo courtesy of SD Attorney General

Prison inmates who committed murder while juveniles have a chance to escape their mandatory sentence of life without possibility of parole. The U.S. Supreme Court issued its decision this week that Miller v. Alabama is retroactive, and so inmates convicted before that 2012 decision can now ask for a reduced sentence. Justices say states can offer parole eligibility to the affected inmates and avoid a new trial or sentence hearing. In South Dakota, only one inmate, Paul Dean Jensen, is affected.