agriculture

Lori Walsh

In The Moment ... October 13, 2017 Show 198 Hour 1

You can now rediscover a classic Midwestern novel about the relationship between land and the people who farm it. The Center for Western Studies releases a new edition of Herbert Krause's "The Thresher." Patrick Hicks crafted an introduction to this new edition. You can join him this afternoon at 4 p.m. to celebrate the book's release in Sioux Falls.

amazon.com

In The Moment ... September 12, 2017 Show 175 Hour 1

The problem of agriculture is as old as civilization. David Montgomery is a MacArthur Fellow and professor of geomorphology at the University of Washington in Seattle. He's an internationally renowned geologist who studies landscape evolution. His latest book is called "Growing a Revolution: Bringing Our Soil Back to Life." He's coming to Sioux Falls for the 20-17 South Dakota Association Conservation Districts Annual Convention. That's September 17 through the 19. But first he stops by In the Moment.

Andrew Bork

In The Moment ... September 11, 2107 Show 174 Hour 2

As fliers associated with white supremacy make their way to South Dakota (some were recently found in Sioux Falls) state residents are reminded that neo-Nazi sentiments are not a thing of the past. How do we address nationalism, racism, and Nazi sympathies today? We begin with a look at history.

rampages.us

In The Moment ... August 17,2017 Show 158 Hour 1

Twenty-five years ago, agreement was reached on the North American Free Trade Agreement. It’s a trade pact that gradually eliminated most tariffs and trade barriers between the United States, Canada, and Mexico. Has NAFTA been good or bad for the U.S.? Has it been good or bad for South Dakota? Today we welcome Russell Green. He’s a Will Clayton Fellow in International Economics for Rice University’s Baker Institute for Public Policy.

SDPB

In The Moment ... August 16, 2017 Show 157 Hour 2

Roger Whittle is Managing Editor of the Watertown Public Opinion. Dana Ferguson is a political watchdog reporter with the Argus Leader. This week on the Dakota Political Junkies we discuss hate groups in America and the role of public officials to address their actions publicly. We also talk tax reform and news from DakotaFest.

agriculture.com

In The Moment ... July 24, 2017 Show 140 Hour 1

Successful Farming Magazine has released its "10 Successful Farmers" list, honoring ag professionals who choose to innovate, adapt, and sustain successful ag business. One of this year's honorees hails from Ideal, South Dakota and his method is simple: watch how Mother Nature takes care of herself and mimic her ways. Today, Bryan Jorgenson joins us. Read his full story here: Agriculture.com/10farmers.

In The Moment ... July 17, 2017 Show 135 Hour 1

Tomorrow is a pivotal day for the Dakota Power Community Wind project and Lincoln County residents. The public votes to either keep the ordinance of a roughly quarter-mile setback between Dakota Wind's turbines and residences or increase the setback to a half mile. The result of the vote could change the future of clean energy in South Dakota. SDPB's Leah Cover joins us with more.

Kealey Bultena / SDPB

Biotechnology is a booming business, and South Dakota companies are competing with organizations around the globe. Local scientists pioneer medicine, agriculture, manufacturing, and research. A researcher-turned-business developer outlines his assessment for area investors and scientists in an extended interview.

South Dakota Biotech's annual summit brought professionals together for the discussion, and some future scientists help equip fellow kids.

Kealey Bultena / SDPB

Schools and producers are working to feed kids with local crops. A federal grant worth $24,158 helps educate stakeholders on the Farm to School movement. The project brings local ingredients to school food programs.

Farm to Table restaurants aim to bring local foods directly to diners. Schools have a similar program to connect students with products raised nearby.

Sandra Kangas is the South Dakota Department of Education’s director of Child and Adult Nutrition Services. She says Farm to School improves access to local foods.

Kealey Bultena / SDPB

This week kids in Sioux Falls are planting seeds and sprouts in four raised garden beds next to a parking lot. A few days ago, we brought you a conversation from Ground Works-Midwest about teaching gardens. Volunteers have now constructed more places for food to grow.

National Agriculture Week

Mar 21, 2017
SD Department of Agriculture

National Ag Week runs through the 25th this week. Everyone from state government to high schoolers knows how important the industry is in South Dakota.

Agriculture has a $25.6 billion impact on South Dakota’s economy each year. Officials say this is why the state recognizes Ag producers and future leaders during the week.

As part of the week, the Agriculture Council of America hosts a National Ag Day Video Contest and Essay Contest. This year Bridger Gordon from Whitewood won the essay contest.

Cara Hetland / SDPB

House Bill 1204, an act to authorize the growth and sale of industrialized hemp in South Dakota, passed the Agriculture and Natural Resources Committee by a vote of nine to two on Feb. 16.

It now moves to the House floor.

Ranch Families Face Lost Cattle, Hay, Fences In Cottonwood Fire

Oct 18, 2016
Erin Fitzgerald

The Cottonwood Fire that started Sunday near Wall burned  almost 60 square miles of western South Dakota rangeland and killed more than 130 cattle.

The fire burned across both public and private land.  Local officials say about 15 families ranch in the burned area. Besides cattle losses, miles of fencing are burned and tons of hay that was set aside for winter are now gone.

Drop In Cattle Prices Hurting South Dakota Ranchers

Sep 21, 2016

South Dakota ranchers and cattle feeders are feeling the pinch as sale prices are falling.

Some in the industry blame country of origin labeling and foreign beef imports, but others say a number of factors can contribute to a drop in prices.

Recent drops in the market mean some ranchers are losing as much as 400 dollars per-head.

Energy and spirits are low that the Mitchell Livestock Auction house.

Officials in sale barns like this say cattle prices are hitting lows not experienced since 2009. This drop comes after a spike in late 2014.

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As a top industry in the state, agriculture is on the minds of many South Dakotan voters. U.S. Representative Kristi Noem visits Midday to provide her insight on agriculture as she represents local farmers and producers in Washington, D.C. She also discusses the ongoing search for a compromise regarding Country of Origin Labeling, the importance of food supply to national security, and how South Dakotans consistently farm beyond next year’s crop.

Jerry Nelson embraced the American farming dream and lived to tell about it. His book, "Dear County Agent Guy" is a compilation of his newspaper columns. As we continue the Dakota Midday Book Club, Nelson visited the SDPB studios for a conversation about life, death, and laughter and why you should never sleep with a baby chick.

Hawks for U.S. House

As one of South Dakota's largest industries, agriculture sows its way into the political landscape. Paula Hawks is the Democratic nominee for the U.S. House of Representatives. She cites country-of-origin labeling and loss of USDA's Conservation Reserve Program acres as major issues in state agriculture. She discusses the agriculture conversation in Washington, the Farm Bill, and preparations for the November election.

Denise Ross from the Black Hills Knowledge Network and Seth Tupper from the Rapid City Journal lend their voices to the weekly Midday segment Dakota Political Junkies. Some topics of discussion include the memorable face palm from one South Dakotan, the GOP's platform, figures missing at the GOP national convention, and agriculture's role in the race for the U.S. House of Representatives between Kristi Noem and Paula Hawks.

Heat Wave Could Hurt Corn Yield

Jul 19, 2016
South Dakota State University

Extension experts warn some of the state’s corn crop could fall victim to the hot, dry weather this week.  The crop is now in a stage of pollination.  Officials say excessive heat at this point in the season can affect corn yield for the year.

Agriculture experts worry the current drought and heat wave conditions in the state are not good for the corn crop.   Jonathan Kleinjan is a crop production associate at SDSU.  

“Heat in itself is not necessarily a big problem, it’s when you’re hot and dry at the same time," says Kleinjan.

SD OneHealth Funds Animal-Borne Illness Awareness

Jul 18, 2016

Doctors, veterinarians and ranchers are partnering to fight animal-borne illness. USD’s Sanford School of Medicine aims to open a dialogue between human health care providers, and those who care for animals to protect South Dakotans and livestock against disease.

Pollution And Recreation On The Big Sioux

Jul 11, 2016
Water testing
Erin Mairose

Water testing on the Big Sioux River shows high levels of bacteria and pollution in some areas. The South Dakota Department of Environment and Natural Resources recommends only having limited contact with the water, meaning they don’t suggest swimming in it.

But the city of Sioux Falls continues to build parks and recreation areas along the river, in the effort to foster economic development.

The pheasant is not only important in South Dakota for its cultural value, but also for what it contributes to the economy. In 2015, more than 150 thousand hunters harvested more than one point two million pheasants in South Dakota. Nearly 85 thousand hunters came from out of state. They poured millions of dollars into local economies. South Dakota isn’t a pheasant destination by accident.

New Law Requires Gates For Paddlers

Jun 24, 2016
Big Sioux, Kayaking, Water
Erin Mairose

Navigable streams and rivers in South Dakota used for kayaking, canoeing, and snowmobiling are considered public highways. But landowners with livestock often put fences across the water. The fences can pose major safety hazards to those paddling or traveling downstream.  To allow access through fenced off portions of streams, a law going into effect July 1st compiles a list of streams requiring gates

SD Fertilizer Runoff And The Gulf Dead Zone

Jun 24, 2016

Oceanographers fear that this year the Gulf of Mexico could see its largest dead zone ever recorded. 

Researchers attribute the massive annual die off of fish around the Mississippi delta to fertilizer runoff from agriculture in the Great Plains.

Officials in South Dakota say they recognize this problem and are taking action.

SDDA To Recycle Pesticide Containers

Jun 23, 2016

The South Dakota Department of Agriculture is collecting pesticide containers this summer. Anyone with empty plastic pesticide containers can bring them to the nearest collection location for recycling. Amanda Bachmann (BOCK-man) is a pesticide specialist at South Dakota State University.  She says the Department of Agriculture has offered this program since 1993 and has become one of its most popular services. Bachmann says many waste management companies will not accept pesticide containers, so recycling them prevents improper disposal.

Oil Seed Crops May Increase With New EPA Standards

Jun 9, 2016

The ethanol industry might need to make way for a new biofuel crop.  The EPA just increased its requirements for the amount of renewable fuel in gasoline.  Researchers working on bio fuel production say South Dakota could become a center for new oil seed crops.

The Environmental Protection Agency just released new federal standards for renewable fuel. These standards increase demands for all biofuels. EPA officials hope the change boosts production in the global market and lowers carbon emissions.

Dakota Midday: Fighting To Keep The Hives Alive

Jun 9, 2016

  Dr. Jon Lundgren from the Blue Dasher Farm Initiative joins Dakota Midday to talk about regenerative agriculture as a solution to problems in the bee population. Farmers, rancher and beekeepers will gather on Monday, June 13 at Blue Dasher Farm as part of the national Keep the Hives Alive tour. 

Growing Season Gets Wet Start In Parts of SD

Jun 2, 2016

Defining a normal growing season in South Dakota is no easy task. This spring farmers in parts of the state are facing some very wet weather.

South Dakota’s corn and soybean yields are taking a hit with heavy spring moisture in the southeast. Rainfall amounts are almost twice the average in some areas.  And farmers say this has slowed spring fieldwork.

Honeybee Population Continues To Decline

May 18, 2016
USDA

Honeybees are in decline.   The numbers in the first months of 2016 show the national honeybee population has hit new lows. SDPB’s Allie Knofczynski reports on the research and efforts across South Dakota to protect its state insect.

The number of honeybee colonies in South Dakota is down 40 percent from last year. Colonies lost during the first three months of this year totaled 1 percent of the statewide population. According to the US Department of Agriculture, the honeybee decline began in 2006.

Kealey Bultena / SDPB

South Dakotans list agriculture as the number one driver of economic development. That’s according to a recent survey that polled people nationally and gathered data in three separate states. Some people’s perceptions of the economy don’t jibe directly with information from businesses. 

A Wells Fargo and USA Today survey polled South Dakotans to find out which sectors they think contribute to a healthy economy. The top responses in order were agriculture, health care, education, construction, and retail.

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