In the Moment: Innovation

Fridays at Noon Central, 11 am Mountain

SDPB Radio News Director Cara Hetland hosts this program which explores the cutting edge products and services being offered by South Dakotans. Airs on alternating Fridays.

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Cyanide Detection

Jan 23, 2015

Cyanide poisoning can kill within 30-minutes.  Having a quick, easy means of detecting exposure can save lives.  Brain Logue, associate professor of Chemistry and Biochemistry at South Dakota State University, and his team have developed a sensor that will detect cyanide poisoning in less than a minute through a National Institutes of Health/Department of Defense grant.  The current clinical standard is a 24-hour lab-based test.  The new technology would be used by emergency rooms and first responders.  A post-doctoral student on the project, Randy Jackson explained that multiple prototypes

Cruciferous Vegetables And Cancer Metastasis

Jan 23, 2015
South Dakota State University

Associate professor Moul Dey and her team have examined whether phenethyl isothiocyante, a dietary compound produced when people chew cruciferous vegetables such as watercress, broccoli, cabbage and cauliflower, can help prevent recurrence and metastasis of cancer.  Using cancer stem cells of human origin, they found that it may be effective as a dietary approach for preventing recurrence and metastasis and improving therapeutic outcomes for cancer patients.  Dr. Dey described her work and plans for future tests.

Strengthening Bridges

Jan 23, 2015
South Dakota State University

Nadim Wehbe, director of the Jerome L. Lohr Structures Lab, said that testing has revealed that a new means of joining precast double-tee bridges can dramatically increase a bridge's lifetime.

Earlier this week, the Sioux Falls Development Foundation made a $3 million investment in SAB Biotherapeutics to bolster the Bio-Tech industry in the area. SAB Biotherapeutics uses genetically engineered cattle to produce human antibodies. CEO and co-founder Dr. Eddie Sullivan discusses his company and the science behind human antibodies.   

Thayne Munce is associate director of the Sanford Sports Science Institute. He authored a study on brain injury risk in youth football. The studied monitored 22 local youth football players ages 11 to 13 during a single season of 27 practices and 9 games. Each player wore sensors in his helmet which measured head-impact frequency, magnitude, duration and location. More than 6,000 head impacts were recorded, and found to be similar in magnitude and location to those in high school and college football but less frequent.

Changes To Health Exchange

Dec 29, 2014
Avera Health

This is the second year of the federal health insurance marketplace, also known as the "exchange." December 15 is the deadline to apply for the insurance exchange under the Affordable Care Act. Deb Muller, Avera Health Plans Chief Administrative Officer, joined Innovation host Cara Hetland to visit about what has been learned and changes coming with respect to the exchange.

Fetal Alcohol Syndrome Disorder Study

Dec 29, 2014
Sanford Health

Dr. Gene Hoyme is internationally known for his work with Fetal Alcohol Syndrome Disorder. He also serves as president of Sanford Research and chief academic officer for Sanford Health. Hoyme has led FASD research studies in South Africa for the past 15 years. He co-authored a study that shows nearly five-percent of U.S. children may be affected by FASD.  The study explored the incidence of FASD among first grade students in Sioux Falls.

Jodi Schwan, Editor of the Sioux Falls Business Journal, discusses the first Sioux Falls Made Market December 5, 2014, at the Sioux Falls Argus Leader.  Schwan says the makers movement taps into the American culture that says if you can dream it, you can make a living with it.  She says incubating start-up commerce leads to new businesses.

Michael Lawler, Ph.D., Dean of the USD School of Health Sciences discusses the role of interprofessional education in Health Sciences.  The concept called "interprofessionalism" simulates and teach activities that mimic reality.  It helps students understand the role of other healthcare professionals as it relates to their own field.  

Russ Wilke, MD, Internal Medicine Physician at Sanford Health in Fargo.  Wilke is a co-author in a study published in Nature Communications  about how statin medications that can be attributed to genetic factors. Statins are the most commonly prescribed class of drugs in the United States.  These drugs reduce the frequency and severity of cardiovascular disease in patients at risk for heart attack and stroke.  The study looked at genetics, drugs and side effects in patients.

Accelerator Boot Camp

Aug 15, 2014
South Dakota Technology Business Center

Cara Hetland hosted today's Innovation program from the South Dakota Technology Business Center in Sioux Falls where she visited with several entrepreneurs at the annual Accelerator Boot Camp.  Pam Boehm, Entrepreneurship and Incubation Manager at the Technology Business Center, discussed this year's boot camp.

Susan Sanders, warning coordinator with the National Weather Service, spoke on the science of weather and weather safety during the Neutrino Day Science Cafe in . The presentation was recorded live from the Bumping Buffalo in Lead.

In an extended cut of the original story, SDPB's Charle Michael Ray shares more on the efforts of researchers near Wind Cave to save prairie dogs from the plague. Plus, SDPB's Kent Osborne reminds listeners of the upcoming Landscapes of South Dakota photo contest and presents a special challenge for this weekend.

SDPB

In honor of Neutrino Day, this week's Innovation broadcast live from a mile undergroud at the Sanford Underground Research Facility. Scientists from around the country and the world gather there to investigate the mysterious building block of the universe: dark matter.  

  , and UC Berkley grad student Mia Ihm explained the LUX experiment, which uses the most sensitive dark matter detector in the world. Alan Poon and Wenqin Xu of the Majoranna Project also explained the underground construction of a new double beta decay detector.

SDPB

Neutrino Day keynote speakers Joel Primack and Nancy Ellen Abrams believe we are at the center of the visible universe...and so is everything else. Primack is a professor of physics and astrophysics at the University of California Santa Cruz, and Abrams is a writer with a B.A. in history and the philosophy of science from the University of Chicago.

SDPB

On the eve of the 7th annual Neutrino Day, Sanford Underground Research Facility lab director Mike Headley discussed the future of the lab, which includes the next generation of dark matter research. Communications director Connie Walter also shared what visitor's can expect from Neutrino Day. Among many other attractions, the free event features the Journey Museum planetarium, tours of the underground lab and a space school musical.

Sioux Falls-Based Company Wins NASA Award

Jun 20, 2014
Raven Industries

Raven Industries is based in Sioux Falls and highly successful, but many don’t know what the industry produces. In addition to making all large-scale Macy’s Thanksgiving Parade balloons since the early 1980s, Raven Industries creates high altitude balloons that have been used by NASA as well as innovative technologies to aid the agriculture industry. Raven Industries Communications Manager Kristen Tilus joined the program to discuss in detail the company’s success, including a recent award from NASA.

The Argus Leader

Dave Hintz is the Warning Coordinator for the NWS in Aberdeen. He's currently stations at the Emergency Operations Center in Pierre to assist with flood and tornado operations in Wessington Springs. He joined the program to explain the wild weather pattern that has rocked South Dakota over the last week, and to clarify the differences in different storm warnings.  

Algae In Rapid Creek Warrants Study

Jun 20, 2014
Charles Michael Ray, SDPB

Anyone spending time along Rapid Creek may have noticed what looks like clumped up toilet paper in the water. It is, in fact, natural algae called didymo. Dr. Lisa Kunza, an assistant professor at South Dakota School of Mines and Technology, is studying the algae. She met with SDPB's Charles Michael Ray to discuss the impact the increase in didymo may be having on the Rapid Creek ecosystem.

Avera Queen of Peace Announces Major Expansion Project

Jun 20, 2014
Avera

Friday morning, Avera Queen of Peace CEO Tom Clark announced that 30 acres of lands have been purchased as part of a long-term development plan just off I-90. Ground breaking is planned for August 5th, and the first project will be a new office facility. Eventually, a new hospital will be added to the new acreage near Mitchell. Tom Clark joined the program to discuss the reasons behind the expansion and what patients can look forward to with the new facility.

Sanford Researcher Wins $1.75 Million Grant

Jun 6, 2014

Sanford Research's Dr. Jill Weimer recently won a $1.75 million grant from the National Institutes of Health. Over five years, this money will help Dr. Weimer study intracellular trafficking in neurological disorders, including the rare pediatric Batten disease. Dr. Weimer joined the program to share her knowledge of Batten disease and how this grant will help expand knowledge of other disorders.

Dave Burgess

Dave Burgess is a teacher and author of the New York Times best-seller "Teach Like A Pirate." In the book he outlines the need for passion and innovation in the classroom. On June 18-19, Burgess will present his ideas at a South Dakota State University event meant to encourage more students to become teachers. Dave Burgess joined the program to discuss his book. Later in the segment, SDSU associate professor Sharon Vestal addressed the purpose of Burgess' appearance and the need for math and science teachers.

Avera Team Uses Genetics to Fight Cancer

Jun 6, 2014
Avera Medical

Dr. Brian Leyland-Jones leads the applied genomics team that specializes in scientific and medical aspects of cancer at Avera McKennan. He joined the program to discuss genetics in a clinic setting, as well as the possibility of cancer treatments beyond chemotherapy.

First Graduates Of New Technology High School

May 16, 2014

New Technology High School graduates its first class of students this weekend.  Innovation host Cara Hetland spent an hour visiting with students and faculty about the past four years and the new style of teaching.  Guests included Principal Dolly Ellwein, counselor Vickie Donohoe, Spanish 1 teacher Chris Coughlin, administrative intern Heidi Jorgenson and seniors Leah Bernard, Wes Rasmusson, Max Rysdon and Mina Big Eagle.

Farmers And Soil

Apr 18, 2014

Jeff Hemenway, Soil Quality Specialist for the USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service, and Paul Hetland, a farmer in Mitchell, joined the program to discuss the science and technology with what farmers will do with soil to make it more productive.

Climate Change

Apr 18, 2014

Dr. John Stamm with the United States Geological Survey in Rapid City spoke with Charles Michael Ray about his presentation at the annual Western South Dakota Hydrology Conference earlier this month about climate change. To view the final draft of the April 2014 IPCC report, go to: http://mitigation2014.org/report/final-draft.

Anniversaries For Landsat 7 And 8 Satellites

Apr 18, 2014

This week marks the 15th anniversary of the Landsat 7 satellite and the first anniversary of images coming from Landsat 8. Jim Vogelmann, Research Ecologist for the U.S. Geological Survey Center for Earth Resources Observation and Science, joined Innovation to discuss the satellites and what they've done for science.

Don And Carmen Meyer Center Of Excellence

Apr 4, 2014

Michael O'Keefe, VP Business Development Avera St. Lukes, discussed the launch of the Don and Carmen Meyer Center of Excellence that will house the Avera Cancer Institute in Aberdeen.

Walking Forward Program In South Dakota

Apr 4, 2014

Dr. Daniel Petereit, Department of Radiation Oncology at Rapid City Regional Hospital's Cancer Care Institute, and Principal Investigator of Walking Forward, and Dr. C. Norman Coleman,  Associate Director and Radiation Research Program Senior Investigator for the National Cancer Institute, based in Bethesda, Maryland, joined Innovation host Cara Hetland to discuss the Walking Forward program in South Dakota as well as the efforts to take lessons learned world-wide.

Scott Meyer is the brofounder of 9 Clouds, a digital marketing and education firm that improves the digital literacy of businesses. He writes and hosts the Digital Homesteading blog and podcast focusing on growing rural business and community. His most recent book, Navigating Social Media: A Field Guide, provides strategies and tutorials for using social media effectively for business. Learn more and join his band of digital homesteaders at 9clouds.com/blog. Meyer talked about new efforts to teach rural entrepreneurs how to improve their communities.

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